Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Cell & Developmental Biology  (2)
  • Inversions  (2)
  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY : Wiley-Blackwell
    BioEssays 2 (1985), S. 263-267 
    ISSN: 0265-9247
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: The small, relatively constant size and conservative evolution of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) make it an ideal molecule for tracing the evolutionary history of plant species. At lower taxonomic levels, cpDNA variation is easily and conveniently assayed by comparing restriction patterns and maps, while at higher taxonomic levels, DNA sequencing and inversion analysis are the methods of choice for comparing chloroplast genomes. The study of cpDNA variation has already yielded important new insights into the origin and evolution of many agriculturally important crop plants, and promises to significantly enhance our phylogenetic understanding of the major lines of descent among land plants and algae.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY : Wiley-Blackwell
    BioEssays 17 (1995), S. 1005-1008 
    ISSN: 0265-9247
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: The most common form of the CO2-fixing enzyme rubisco is a form I enzyme, heretofore found universally in oxygenic phototrophs (cyanobacteria and plastids) and widely in proteobacteria. Two groups(1-4), however, now report that in dinoflagellate plastids the usual form I rubisco has been replaced by the distantly related form II enzyme, known previously only from anaerobic proteobacteria. This raises the important question of how such an oxygensensitive rubisco could function in an aerobic organism. Moreover, the dinoflagellate rubisco has unusual molecular properties: it is encoded as a polyprotein, by nuclear (rather than plastid) genes, and these genes contain noncanonical spliceosomal introns. The nuclear location and alphaproteobacterial affinity of dinoflagellate rubisco genes hint at a possible mitochondrial origin and highlight the extraordinary richness of lateral gene transfers, both between and within organisms, that have occurred during rubisco evolution.
    Additional Material: 1 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-1432
    Keywords: Chloroplast DNA ; Rearrangements ; Inversions ; Intron loss ; Homoplasy ; Ranunculaceae ; Anemone complex
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Chloroplast DNA cleavage sites for 10 restriction enzymes were mapped for 46 species representing all sections of Anemone, four closely related genera (Clematis, Pulsatilla, Hepatica, and Knowltonia), and three more distantly related outgroups (Caltha, Ranunculus, and Adonis). Comparison of the maps revealed that the chloroplast genomes of Anemone and related genera have sustained an unusual number and variety of rearrangements. A single inversion of a 42-kb segment was found in the large single-copy region of Adonis aestivalis. Two types of rearrangements were found in the chloroplast genome of Clematis, Anemone, Pulsatilla, Hepatica, and Knowltonia: An approximately 4-kb expansion of the inverted repeat and four inversions within the large single-copy region. These rearrangements support the monophyletic status of these genera, clearly separating them from Caltha, Ranunculus, and Adonis. Two further inversions were found in two Clematis species and three Anemone species. While appearing to support a monophyletic grouping for these taxa, these two inversions conflict with data from both chloroplast restriction sites and morphology and are better interpreted as having occurred twice independently. These are the first two documented cases of homoplastic inversions in chloroplast DNA. Finally, the second intron of the chloroplast rps12 gene was shown to have been lost in the common ancestor of the same three Anemone species that feature the two homoplastic inversions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Key words Chloroplast DNA rearrangements ; Trachelium ; Inversions ; Transposition ; Gene loss
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Comprehensive gene mapping reveals that the chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum is highly rearranged relative to those of other land plants. Evolutionary scenarios that consist of seven to ten inversions, one or two transpositions, both expansion and contraction of the typically size-conserved inverted repeat, a presumed gene loss, deletions within two large open reading frames and several insertions, are sufficient to derive the Trachelium arrangement from the ancestral angiosperm chloroplast DNA arrangement. Two of the rearrangements disrupt transcriptional units that are otherwise conserved among land plants. At least five families of small dispersed repeats exist in the Trachelium chloroplast genome. Most of the repeats are associated with inversion endpoints and may have facilitated inversions through recombination across homologous repeats.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...