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  • Laparoscopic cholecystectomy  (3)
  • Springer  (3)
  • Munksgaard International Publishers
Collection
Publisher
  • Springer  (3)
  • Munksgaard International Publishers
Years
  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-2218
    Keywords: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy ; Bile leak ; Cholelithiasis ; Complications
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is now the treatment of choice for gallstones, but there has been concern that bile leakage with LC is more frequent than after open cholecystectomy (OC). We have analyzed our experience of this complication with regard to both its incidence and management. From a consecutive series of 500 LC, in which both operative cholangiography and drainage of the gallbladder bed were routine, bile leakage was identified in ten patients (2%). There was no bile duct injury. Nine of the ten patients presented with bile in the drain within 24 h of operation and one patient presented 1 week after operation with a subphrenic collection. Of the ten patients, five settled spontaneously. Of the five remaining patients, two needed laparotomy—one for a subphrenic collection not responding to percutaneous drainage and one for biliary peritonitis. One patient was treated by relaparoscopy and suture of a duct of Luschka and one patient had successful percutaneous drainage of an infected collection; the fifth patient who presented with a late subphrenic collection of bile was shown at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) to have a cystic duct stump leak and was treated with an endoscopic stent. Bile leakage is seen more frequently after LC than OC for reasons that are currently unclear. We believe that the use of routine gallbladder bed drainage is justified for this reason alone. The majority of bile leaks settle either spontaneously or with minimally invasive intervention.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-2218
    Keywords: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy ; Liver retraction ; Fundus-first
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Removal of the gallbladder with commencement of dissection at the fundus is well recognized as a safe technique during difficult “open” cholecystectomy because it minimizes the risks of damage to the structures in or around Calot's triangle. We report here the routine employment of liver retractors and fundus-first dissection during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) as an alternative to techniques previously described. Retraction of the liver and “fundus-first” dissection was used in 53 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecytectomy. There were 16 male and 37 female patients. Seven were operations performed during an acute admission and 20 had moderate or severe adhesions involving the gallbladder. Thirteen patients had a preexisting abdominal incision. The procedure was successful in 52 patients (98%), but in one patient it was converted to open operation because of dense adhesions. Median duration of operation was 90 min (range 35–240 min). There was no mortality and two complications (persistent right upper quadrant pain for 2 weeks after operation and bile leakage from the gallbladder bed). The facility to retract the liver and carry out a fundus-first dissection extends techniques developed for “open” surgery into the laparoscopic arena. It offers the surgeon the safety and versatility during laparoscopic cholecystectomy that it confers during conventional open surgery.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-2218
    Keywords: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy ; Pregnancy ; Second-trimester pregnancy
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now the standard treatment for symptomatic gallstones; while symptomatic gallstones during pregnancy are not frequent they are by no means rare. The role of laparoscopic cholecystectomy during pregnancy is controversial but initial reports suggest it is both safe and feasible. Methods: During a consecutive series of 500 laparoscopic cholecystectomies, 3 patients have undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy during pregnancy. The 3 patients were 16–27 weeks pregnant with an average age of 32 years. The indication for laparoscopic cholecystectomy was severe pain in two patients and gallstone pancreatitis in one patient. Following standard obstetric anesthesia, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Open cannulation was used to establish peritoneal access, following which “standard,” four-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed without complication. The insufflation pressure used was 8–10 mmHg CO2 and a liver retractor was employed to facilitate access. Results: In each case the postoperative recovery was rapid and uneventful for both mother and fetus. The patients were discharged on the first or second postoperative day. Conclusions: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy during the second trimester of pregnancy is both safe and feasible provided both suitable surgical and anesthetic expertise are available. Even up to the end of the second trimester there is sufficient access for the technique to be employed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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