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  • 1
    Keywords: DISEASE ; VARIANTS ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; BLADDER-CANCER ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; METAANALYSIS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; imputation ; RISK LOCI ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS
    Abstract: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 x 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 x 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 x 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 x 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 x 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 x 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25086665
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; DIAGNOSIS ; LUNG-CANCER ; HISTORY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; METABOLISM ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; DELETION ; MUTANT ; GLUTATHIONE ; AGE ; smoking ; cancer risk ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; M1 ; glutathione-S-transferase ; GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE ; case-control study ; ENVIRONMENTAL CARCINOGENS ; GSTM1 ; GSTT1 ; METAANALYSIS ; CLASS-MU ; GSTT1 POLYMORPHISMS
    Abstract: The glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes are involved in the metabolism of various carcinogens. Deletion polymorphisms in the genes GSTM1 and GSTT1 and a base transition polymorphism at codon 105 (Ile--〉Val) in GSTP1 were investigated in relation to breast cancer risk. Tobacco smoking and reproductive factors were examined as potential effect modifiers. Individual data from seven case-control studies were pooled within the International Collaborative Study on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens. To measure the effect of GSTs on breast cancer risk, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed adjusting for study center and age. The modifying effect was investigated by stratification on variables of smoking habits and reproductive history. A total of 2,048 cases with breast cancer and 1,969 controls were analyzed. The relative odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of breast cancer was 0.98 (0.86-1.12) with the GSTM1 null, 1.11 (0.87-1.41) with the GSTT1 null, 1.01 (0.79-1.28) with GSTP1 heterozygous mutants, and 0.93 (0.62-1.38) with GSTP1 homozygous mutants. Stratification by smoking or reproductive factors did not reveal a modifying effect of these variables, nor was there any association between GSTM1 and age at diagnosis of breast cancer. This is the largest study investigating susceptibility to breast cancer due to polymorphisms in the GST genes. The results conclusively show that single gene GST polymorphisms do not confer a substantial risk of breast cancer to its carriers. Furthermore, GSTs did not interact with smoking or reproductive history to modify cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15342448
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  • 3
    Keywords: carcinoma ; POPULATION ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; MARKER ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; PLATFORM
    Abstract: Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 x 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25378557
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  • 4
    Keywords: RISK ; BRCA1 ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; ESTROGEN ; ALLELES ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; GENOTYPE IMPUTATION
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining approximately 14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P 〈 5 x 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25751625
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  • 5
    Keywords: carcinoma ; RISK ; ACTIVATION ; METAANALYSIS ; 8Q24 ; SCAN ; HOMEOBOX GENE-EXPRESSION ; CDX2 ; PITX1
    Abstract: To identify new genetic factors for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a genome-wide association study in east Asians. By analyzing genome-wide data in 2,098 cases and 5,749 controls, we selected 64 promising SNPs for replication in an independent set of samples, including up to 5,358 cases and 5,922 controls. We identified four SNPs with association P values of 8.58 x 10(-7) to 3.77 x 10(-10) in the combined analysis of all east Asian samples. Three of the four were replicated in a study conducted in 26,060 individuals of European descent, with combined P values of 1.22 x 10(-10) for rs647161 (5q31.1), 6.64 x 10(-9) for rs2423279 (20p12.3) and 3.06 x 10(-8) for rs10774214 (12p13.32 near the CCND2 gene), derived from meta-analysis of data from both east Asian and European-ancestry populations. This study identified three new CRC susceptibility loci and provides additional insight into the genetics and biology of CRC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23263487
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; THERAPY ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; incidence ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; DESIGN ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; cancer risk ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; BIRTH COHORT ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVE USE ; REQUIRING PROLONGED OBSERVATION ; METAANALYSIS ; HORMONAL FACTORS ; ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASURES ; EPITHELIAL OVARIAN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Only about half the studies that have collected information on the relevance of women's height and body mass index to their risk of developing ovarian cancer have published their results, and findings are inconsistent. Here, we bring together the worldwide evidence, published and unpublished, and describe these relationships. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Individual data on 25,157 women with ovarian cancer and 81,311 women without ovarian cancer from 47 epidemiological studies were collected, checked, and analysed centrally. Adjusted relative risks of ovarian cancer were calculated, by height and by body mass index. Ovarian cancer risk increased significantly with height and with body mass index, except in studies using hospital controls. For other study designs, the relative risk of ovarian cancer per 5 cm increase in height was 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.09; p〈0.001); this relationship did not vary significantly by women's age, year of birth, education, age at menarche, parity, menopausal status, smoking, alcohol consumption, having had a hysterectomy, having first degree relatives with ovarian or breast cancer, use of oral contraceptives, or use of menopausal hormone therapy. For body mass index, there was significant heterogeneity (p〈0.001) in the findings between ever-users and never-users of menopausal hormone therapy, but not by the 11 other factors listed above. The relative risk for ovarian cancer per 5 kg/m(2) increase in body mass index was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.07-1.13; p〈0.001) in never-users and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.92-0.99; p = 0.02) in ever-users of hormone therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Ovarian cancer is associated with height and, among never-users of hormone therapy, with body mass index. In high-income countries, both height and body mass index have been increasing in birth cohorts now developing the disease. If all other relevant factors had remained constant, then these increases in height and weight would be associated with a 3% increase in ovarian cancer incidence per decade. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22606070
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  • 7
    Keywords: carcinoma ; fibroblasts ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; REVERSE-TRANSCRIPTASE HTERT ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; COMMON VARIANTS ; TERT-CLPTM1L LOCUS ; BUCCAL CELLS
    Abstract: TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOG, we analyzed similar to 480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 x 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 x 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 x 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 x 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 x 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 x 10-14) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 x 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23535731
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  • 8
    Keywords: POPULATION ; INFECTION ; BIOMARKERS ; HEALTH ; NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; METAANALYSIS ; INTERLEUKIN-8 ; serology ; CHINESE MEN
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to play a significant role in the aetiology of cancer, including gastric cancer. In the present study, we sought to examine pre-diagnostic systemic cytokine levels in plasma, which can be seen as markers of aggregate inflammation, and risk of distal gastric cancer in a case-control study nested within the prospective Shanghai Men's Health Study. METHODS: Circulating levels of eight inflammation-related cytokines were measured in the plasma collected at baseline for 180 incident cases of distal gastric cancer and 358 matched controls. Helicobacter pylori sero-positivity was assessed using multiplex serology. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Individuals with IL-8 levels above the lowest quartile were at twofold increased odds of gastric cancer [OR 1.91 (95 % CI 1.05-3.46), OR 2.10 (95 % CI 1.19-3.74), and OR 2.30 (95 % CI 1.26-4.19), for the second through fourth quartiles, respectively]. While there were suggestions of an increase in risk with increased level of many of the other cytokines measured (IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma), no significant associations were found at the p 〈 0.05 level. Infection with CagA-positive H. pylori did not modify these associations. CONCLUSIONS: In a population with high gastric cancer incidence and high H. pylori prevalence, increased circulating levels of IL-8 may indicate increased risk of gastric cancer. These findings add to our understanding of the disease and further efforts to uncover biomarkers of disease risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24052422
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  • 9
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; MUTATIONS ; CELL-GROWTH ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOTOXIN-BETA-RECEPTOR
    Abstract: Known genetic loci explain only a small proportion of the familial relative risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a genome-wide association study of CRC in East Asians with 14,963 cases and 31,945 controls and identified 6 new loci associated with CRC risk (P = 3.42 x 10(-8) to 9.22 x 10(-21)) at 10q22.3, 10q25.2, 11q12.2, 12p13.31, 17p13.3 and 19q13.2. Two of these loci map to genes (TCF7L2 and TGFB1) with established roles in colorectal tumorigenesis. Four other loci are located in or near genes involved in transcriptional regulation (ZMIZ1), genome maintenance (FEN1), fatty acid metabolism (FADS1 and FADS2), cancer cell motility and metastasis (CD9), and cell growth and differentiation (NXN). We also found suggestive evidence for three additional loci associated with CRC risk near genome-wide significance at 8q24.11, 10q21.1 and 10q24.2. Furthermore, we replicated 22 previously reported CRC-associated loci. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CRC and suggests the involvement of new biological pathways.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24836286
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  • 10
    Keywords: DISEASE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; POLYMORPHISMS ; IDENTIFICATION ; METAANALYSIS ; telomere length ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; 5P15.33
    Abstract: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 x 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 x 10(-5)), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 x 10(-5)) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 x 10(-5)). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants. What's new? Most pancreatic cancer patients do not survive long after diagnosis, and, so far, there are not many genetic markers to help screen for the disease. In search of genetic predictors of pancreatic cancer, the authors zoomed in on a region linked to susceptibility to the disease. They measured the frequency of different variants of two genes, telomerase reverse transcriptase and telomerase RNA component, among thousands of pancreatic cancer patients and controls. They identified several variants of the TERT gene that indicate a boosted pancreatic cancer risk, and which may develop into useful prognostic tools.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25940397
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