Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • MODEL  (18)
Collection
Keywords
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; DEATH ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; RECRUITMENT ; PREDICTION ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION ; MEDICINE ; NOV ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; PREDICTING MORTALITY ; ROC CURVE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. METHODS We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We used a Cox regression analysis, with age as the time variable, and stratified the models according to study center and age at recruitment, with further adjustment for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and height. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 14,723 participants died. The lowest risks of death related to BMI were observed at a BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women. After adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly associated with the risk of death. Relative risks among men and women in the highest quintile of waist circumference were 2.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 2.33) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.56 to 2.04), respectively, and in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio, the relative risks were 1.68 (95% CI, 1.53 to 1.84) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.66), respectively. BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P〈0.001). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist-tohip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19005195
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; TIME ; POLYMORPHISMS ; hippocampus ; CARE ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; smoking ; RATES ; DAMAGE ; RISK FACTOR ; PREVALENCE ; LIPID-PEROXIDATION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CORTEX ; USA ; prospective ; INCREASED RISK ; RISK-FACTOR ; lipid ; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ; INVESTIGATE ; 33 ; FORMALDEHYDE ; SPORADIC ALS
    Abstract: Objective: Cigarette smoking has been reported as "probable" risk factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a poorly understood disease in terms of aetiology. The extensive longitudinal data of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) were used to evaluate age-specific mortality rates from ALS and the role of cigarette smoking on the risk of dying from ALS. Methods: A total of 517,890 healthy subjects were included, resulting in 4,591,325 person-years. ALS cases were ascertained through death certificates. Cox hazard models were built to investigate the role of smoking on the risk of ALS, using packs/years and smoking duration to study dose-response. Results: A total of 118 subjects died from ALS, resulting in a crude mortality rate of 2.69 per 100,000/year. Current smokers at recruitment had an almost two-fold increased risk of dying from ALS compared to never smokers (HR = 1.89, 95% C.I. 1.14-3.14), while former smokers at the time of enrolment had a 50% increased risk (HR = 1.48, 95% C.I. 0.94-2-32). The number of years spent smoking increased the risk of ALS (p for trend = 0.002). Those who smoked more than 33 years had more than a two-fold increased risk of ALS compared with never smokers (HR = 2.16, 95% C.I. 1.33-3.53). Conversely, the number of years since quitting smoking was associated with a decreased risk of ALS compared with continuing smoking. Interpretation: These results strongly support the hypothesis of a role of cigarette smoking in aetiology of ALS. We hypothesize that this could occur through lipid peroxidation via formaldehyde exposure. Ann Neurol 2009;65:378-385
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19399866
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; RISK ; TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; smoking ; cancer risk ; ethanol ; NETHERLANDS ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; pancreas ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; WEIGHT ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; BEER ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; MALE SMOKERS ; BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION ; COFFEE CONSUMPTION
    Abstract: To examine the association of baseline and lifetime ethanol intake with cancer of the pancreas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Included in this analysis were 478,400 subjects, of whom detailed information on the intake of alcoholic beverages at baseline and over lifetime was collected between 1992 and 2000. During a median follow-up time of 8.9 years, 555 non-endocrine pancreatic cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of ethanol intake at recruitment and average lifetime ethanol intake and pancreatic cancer adjusting for smoking, height, weight, and history of diabetes. Overall, neither ethanol intake at recruitment (relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.27 comparing 30+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d) nor average lifetime ethanol intake (RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.65-1.39) was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. High lifetime ethanol intake from spirits/liquor at recruitment tended to be associated with a higher risk (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 0.93-2.10 comparing 10+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d), but no associations were observed for wine and beer consumption. These results suggest no association of alcohol consumption with the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19145468
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; INTERVENTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; FAT ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; physical activity ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; dietary patterns ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; Lead ; Follow up ; weight gain ; OBESE ADULTS ; PLASMA LEPTIN ; PROTEIN DIET
    Abstract: Background: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results. Objective: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Design: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders. Results: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximate to 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management. Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 92: 398-407
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20592131
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; evaluation ; Germany ; LUNG ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; FREQUENCIES ; NO ; smoking ; cancer risk ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; MULTIVARIATE ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; LIFE-STYLE ; BETA-CAROTENE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; INCREASE ; NONSMOKING WOMEN ; VITAMIN-C ; pooled analysis ; USA ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; comparison ; ERROR ; CHINESE WOMEN ; DIETARY CAROTENOIDS
    Abstract: The association of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer incidence was evaluated using the most recent data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), applying a refined statistical approach (calibration) to account for measurement error potentially introduced by using food frequency questionnaire data. Between 1992 and 2000, detailed information on diet and life-style of 478,590 individuals participating in EPIC was collected. During a median follow-up of 6.4 years, 1,126 lung cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were applied for statistical evaluation. In the whole study population, fruit consumption was significantly inversely associated with lung cancer risk while no association was found for vegetable consumption. In current smokers, however, lung cancer risk significantly decreased with higher vegetable consumption; this association became more pronounced after calibration, the hazard ratio (HR) being 0.78 (95% CI 0.620.98) per 100 g increase in daily vegetable consumption. In comparison, the HR per 100 g fruit was 0.92 (0.85-0.99) in the entire cohort and 0.90 (0.81-0.99) in smokers. Exclusion of cases diagnosed during the first 2 years of follow-up strengthened these associations, the HR being 0.71 (0.55-0.94) for vegetables (smokers) and 0.86 (0.78-0.95) for fruit (entire cohort). Cancer incidence decreased with higher consumption of apples and pears (entire cohort) as well as root vegetables (smokers). In addition to an overall inverse association with fruit intake, the results of this evaluation add evidence for a significant inverse association of vegetable consumption and lung cancer incidence in smokers. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17487840
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; BODY-WEIGHT ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; LEISURE-TIME ; physical activity ; ADULTS ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; fat distribution ; ADIPOSITY ; OVERWEIGHT ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; ENERGY-EXPENDITURE ; BODY-COMPOSITION ; INVESTIGATE ; cross-sectional analysis ; OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; WEIGHT-GAIN
    Abstract: Objectives: Cross-sectional data suggest a strong association between low levels of physical activity and obesity. The EPIC-PANACEA ( European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating out of home And obesity) project was designed to investigate the associations between physical activity and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference based on individual data collected across nine European countries. Methods: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC), 519 931 volunteers were recruited between 1992 and 2000, of whom 405 819 had data on main variables of interest. Height, body weight and waist circumference were measured using standardized procedures. Physical activity was assessed using a validated four-category index reflecting a self-reported usual activity during work and leisure time. The associations between physical activity and BMI and waist circumference were estimated using multilevel mixed effects linear regression models, adjusted for age, total energy intake, smoking status, alcohol consumption and educational level. Results: A total of 125 629 men and 280 190 women with a mean age of 52.9 (s.d. 9.7) and 51.5 (s.d. 10.0) years, respectively were included. The mean BMI was 26.6 kg/m(2) (s.d. 3.6) in men and 25.0 kg/m(2) (s.d. 4.5) in women. Fifty percent of men and 30% of women were categorized as being active or moderately active. A one-category difference in the physical activity index was inversely associated with a difference of 0.18 kg/m(2) in the mean BMI (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.11, 0.24) and 1.04-cm (95% CI 0.82, 1.26) difference in waist circumference in men. The equivalent figures for women were 0.31 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.23, 0.38) and 0.90 cm ( 95% CI 0.71, 1.08), respectively. Conclusions: Physical activity is inversely associated with both BMI and waist circumference across nine European countries. Although we cannot interpret the association causally, our results were observed in a large and diverse cohort independently from many potential confounders
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19223851
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; EXPOSURE ; larynx ; PHARYNX ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; CONTRAST ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; RISK FACTOR ; HEAD ; squamous cell carcinoma ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; ESOPHAGUS ; nutrition ; ORAL CAVITY ; NECK-CANCER ; DRINKING ; CELL CARCINOMA ; REGRESSION ; LIFE ; pooled analysis ; USA ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; SQUAMOUS-CELL ; GENDER-DIFFERENCES ; COMPETING RISKS ; WELL ; CONFIDENCE ; SCC
    Abstract: Recent alcohol consumption is all established risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or the upper aero-digestive tract. In contrast, the role or lifetime exposure to alcohol with regard to risk of SCC is not well established. Historical data oil alcohol use are available in 271,253 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). During 2,330,381 person years, 392 incident SCC cases (279 men and 113 women) were identified. Cox regression vas applied to model sex-specific associations between lifetime alcohol intake and SCC risk adjusting for potential confounders including smoking. Compared to men who drank 0.1-6.0 g/day alcohol at lifetime, the relative risks (RR) for developing SCC were significantly increased for men who drank 30.1-60.0 g/day (RR 1.65, 95% confidence interval: 1.00-2.71), 60.1-96.0 g/day (RR 2.20, 95%CI 1.23-3.95), and 〉96.0 g/day, (RR 4.63, 95% CI 2.52-8.48), and for former drinkers (RR 4.14, 95% CI 2.38-7.19). These risk estimates did not considerably change when baseline alcohol intake was analyzed. Compared to women who drank 0.1-6.0 g/day alcohol intake at lifetime, the RR were significantly increased for women who drank 〉30 g/d (RR 6.05, 95% CI 2.98-12.3). Applying similar categories, the relative risk for baseline alcohol intake was 3.26 (95%CI 1.82-5.87). We observed a stronger association between alcohol intake at lifetime and risk of SCC in women compared to men (p for interaction = 0.045). The strong dose-response relation for lifetime alcohol use underscores that alcohol is an important risk factor of SCC of the upper aero-digestive tract throughout life. (C) 2009 UICC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19378340
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; carcinoma ; MODEL ; COHORT ; RISK ; POLYMORPHISMS ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; RISK FACTOR ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; RECTAL-CANCER ; ASSOCIATIONS ; METAANALYSIS ; INCREASED RISK ; COLON TUMORS ; Tumor Location ; TUMOR MICROSATELLITE INSTABILITY
    Abstract: BACKGROUND & AIMS: There has been consistent evidence for a relationship between smoking and colorectal cancer (CRC), although it is not clear whether the colon or rectum is more sensitive to the effects of smoking. We investigated the relationships between cigarette smoking and risk of CRC and tumor location. METHODS: We analyzed data from 465,879 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study; 2,741 developed CRC during the follow-up period (mean 8.7 years). Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). RESULTS: The risk of colon carcinoma was increased among ever smokers (HR 1.18, 95%CI 1.06-1.32) and former cigarette smokers (HR 1.21, 95%CI 1.08-1.36), compared with never smokers; the increased risk for current smokers was of borderline significance (HR 1.13, 95%CI 0.98-1.31). When stratified for tumor location, the risk of proximal colon cancer was increased for former (HR 1.25, 95%CI 1.04-1.50) and current smokers (HR 1.31, 95%CI 1.06-1.64), but the risks for cancers in the distal colon or rectum were not. Subsite analyses showed a non-significant difference between the proximal and distal colon (p=0.45) for former smokers and a significant difference for current smokers (p=0.02). For smokers that had stopped smoking for at least 20 years, the risk of developing colon cancer was similar to that of never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Ever smokers have an increased risk of colon cancer, which appeared to be more pronounced in the proximal than the distal colon location.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21029790
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; HEALTH ; PROJECT ; nutrition ; HEART-DISEASE ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; fruits and vegetables ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-MORTALITY ; cardiovascular disease ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE MORTALITY ; ALL-CAUSE ; HIROSHIMA/NAGASAKI LIFE-SPAN ; Respiratory disease
    Abstract: Consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower overall mortality. The aim of this study was to identify causes of death through which this association is established. More than 450,000 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study were included, of which 25,682 were reported deceased after 13 years of follow-up. Information on lifestyle, diet and vital status was collected through questionnaires and population registries. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) for death from specific causes were calculated from Cox regression models, adjusted for potential confounders. Participants reporting consumption of more than 569 g/day of fruits and vegetables had lower risks of death from diseases of the circulatory (HR for upper fourth 0.85, 95 % CI 0.77-0.93), respiratory (HR for upper fourth 0.73, 95 % CI 0.59-0.91) and digestive system (HR for upper fourth 0.60, 95 % CI 0.46-0.79) when compared with participants consuming less than 249 g/day. In contrast, a positive association with death from diseases of the nervous system was observed. Inverse associations were generally observed for vegetable, but not for fruit consumption. Associations were more pronounced for raw vegetable consumption, when compared with cooked vegetable consumption. Raw vegetable consumption was additionally inversely associated with death from neoplasms and mental and behavioral disorders. The lower risk of death associated with a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables may be derived from inverse associations with diseases of the circulatory, respiratory and digestive system, and may depend on the preparation of vegetables and lifestyle factors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25154553
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; NETHERLANDS ; case-control studies ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; SMOKERS ; VEGETABLES ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; RELATIVE RISK ; cancer,diet,epidemiology,fruits,vegetables,lung cancer,smoking ; FLAVONOIDS ; NONSMOKING WOMEN
    Abstract: Intake of fruits and vegetables is thought to protect against the development of lung cancer. However, some recent cohort and case-control studies have shown no protective effect. We have assessed the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence in the large prospective investigation on diet and cancer, the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We studied data from 478,021 individuals that took part in the EPIC study, who were recruited from 10 European countries and who completed a dietary questionnaire during 1992-1998. Follow-up was to December 1998 or 1999, but for some centres with active follow-up to June 2002. During follow-up, 1,074 participants were reported to have developed lung cancer, of whom 860 were eligible for our analysis. We used the Cox proportional hazard model to determine the effect of fruit and vegetable intake on the incidence of lung cancer. We paid particular attention to adjustment for smoking. Relative risk estimates were obtained using fruit and vegetable intake categorised by sex-specific, cohort-wide quintiles. After adjustment for age, smoking, height, weight and gender, there was a significant inverse association between fruit consumption and lung cancer risk: the hazard ratio for the highest quintile of consumption relative to the lowest being 0.60 (95% Confidence Interval 0.46-0.78), p for trend 0.0099. The association was strongest in the Northern Europe centres, and among current smokers at baseline, and was strengthened when the 293 lung cancers diagnosed in the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded from the analysis. There was no association between vegetable consumption or vegetable subtypes and lung cancer risk. The findings from this analysis can be regarded as re-enforcing recommendations with regard to enhanced fruit consumption for populations. However, the effect is likely to be small compared to smoking cessation. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14639614
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...