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  • MUTATIONS  (5)
  • CELLS  (3)
  • 1
    Keywords: TUMORS ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ABERRATIONS ; MUTATIONS ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; ANEUPLOIDY ; GENOMIC IMBALANCES ; MAFFUCCI SYNDROME ; OLLIER DISEASE
    Abstract: In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls from 13 genome-wide association studies, we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones in DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. We observed mosaic abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of 〉 2 Mb in size in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%), with abnormal cell proportions of between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, frequency increased with age, from 0.23% under 50 years to 1.91% between 75 and 79 years (P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals; odds ratio (OR) = 1.25; P = 0.016), with stronger association with cases who had DNA collected before diagnosis or treatment (OR = 1.45; P = 0.0005). Detectable mosaicism was also more common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least 1 year before diagnosis with leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR = 35.4; P = 3.8 x 10(-11)). These findings underscore the time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and potentially other late-onset diseases
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22561519
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  • 2
    Keywords: MUTATIONS ; SURVEILLANCE ; CARRIERS ; PREDICTION ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; DISEASE RISK ; ADENOMATOUS POLYPS ; TYPE-2 DIABETES RISK
    Abstract: Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. A study was conducted in a large multi-population study to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data combined with other risk factors. A risk prediction model was built and applied to the Scottish population using available data. Design Nine populations of European descent were studied to develop and validate CRC risk prediction models. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the combined effect of age, gender, family history (FH) and genotypes at 10 susceptibility loci that individually only modestly influence CRC risk. Risk models were generated from case-control data incorporating genotypes alone (n=39 266) and in combination with gender, age and FH (n=11 324). Model discriminatory performance was assessed using 10-fold internal cross-validation and externally using 4187 independent samples. The 10-year absolute risk was estimated by modelling genotype and FH with age- and gender-specific population risks. Results The median number of risk alleles was greater in cases than controls (10 vs 9, p〈2.2x10(-16)), confirmed in external validation sets (Sweden p=1.2x10(-6), Finland p-2x10(-5)). The mean per-allele increase in risk was 9% (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.13). Discriminative performance was poor across the risk spectrum (area under curve for genotypes alone 0.57; area under curve for genotype/age/gender/FH 0.59). However, modelling genotype data, FH, age and gender with Scottish population data shows the practicalities of identifying a subgroup with 〉5% predicted 10-year absolute risk. Conclusion Genotype data provide additional information that complements age, gender and FH as risk factors, but individualised genetic risk prediction is not currently feasible. Nonetheless, the modelling exercise suggests public health potential since it is possible to stratify the population into CRC risk categories, thereby informing targeted prevention and surveillance.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22490517
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; LUNG ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; genetics ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; REGION ; telomerase ; case-control study ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; prospective ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; WOMENS HEALTH ; Genetic ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS
    Abstract: We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20101243
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  • 4
    Keywords: CELLS ; TUMORS ; VARIANTS ; SURVEILLANCE ; METAANALYSIS ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; SCAN ; ER STRESS ; SOCIETY-TASK-FORCE
    Abstract: Over 50 loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been uncovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Identifying additional loci has the potential to help elucidate aspects of the underlying biological processes leading to better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. We re-evaluated a GWAS by excluding controls that have family history of CRC or personal history of colorectal polyps, as we hypothesized that their inclusion reduces power to detect associations. This is supported empirically and through simulations. Two-phase GWAS analysis was performed in a total of 16,517 cases and 14,487 controls. We identified rs17094983, a SNP associated with risk of CRC [p = 2.5 x 10(-10); odds ratio estimated by re-including all controls (OR) = 0.87, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.91; minor allele frequency (MAF) = 13 %]. Results were replicated in samples of African descent (1894 cases and 4703 controls; p = 0.01; OR = 0.86, 95 % CI 0.77-0.97; MAF = 16 %). Gene expression data in 195 colon adenocarcinomas and 59 normal colon tissues from two different studies revealed that this locus has genotypes that are associated with RTN1 (Reticulon 1) expression (p = 0.001), a protein-coding gene involved in survival and proliferation of cancer cells which is highly expressed in normal colon tissues but has significantly reduced expression in tumor cells (p = 1.3 x 10(-8)).
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26404086
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  • 5
    Keywords: liver ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; SIGNALING PATHWAYS ; MUTATIONS ; C-REACTIVE PROTEIN ; GLUCOSE ; NUCLEAR FACTOR 1-ALPHA ; LOGIC REGRESSION ; MICE LEADS
    Abstract: Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P 〈 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 x 10(-6), 1.6 x 10(-5), 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 x 10(-5)), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P 〈 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H.pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22523087
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  • 6
    Keywords: SUSCEPTIBILITY ; MUTATIONS ; GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY ; METAANALYSIS ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; HEREDITARY PANCREATITIS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; POOLED-ANALYSIS ; COHORT-CONSORTIUM PANSCAN ; ABO BLOOD-GROUP
    Abstract: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (〉3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index 〉30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes 〉3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24058443
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  • 7
    Keywords: CELLS ; LUNG-CANCER ; transactivation ; MOLECULAR-GENETICS ; susceptibility loci ; CESSATION ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; NICOTINE DEPENDENCE ; ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION ; ALPHA(2)-ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS
    Abstract: We conducted gene-smoking interaction analysis in GWAS data of pancreati cancer. We found a possible interaction of axon guidance pathway genes with smoking in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer. Once confirmed, it will open a new avenue to unveiling the etiology of smoking-associated pancreatic cancer.Cigarette smoking is the best established modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that underlie smoking-related pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. Taking advantage of the existing Genome-wide association study (GWAS) genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study in 2028 cases and 2109 controls to examine gene-smoking interactions at pathway/gene/single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) level. Using the likelihood ratio test nested in logistic regression models and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we examined 172 KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways, 3 manually curated gene sets, 3 nicotine dependency gene ontology pathways, 17 912 genes and 468 114 SNPs. None of the individual pathway/gene/SNP showed significant interaction with smoking after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Six KEGG pathways showed nominal interactions (P 〈 0.05) with smoking, and the top two are the pancreatic secretion and salivary secretion pathways (major contributing genes: RAB8A, PLCB and CTRB1). Nine genes, i.e. ZBED2, EXO1, PSG2, SLC36A1, CLSTN1, MTHFSD, FAT2, IL10RB and ATXN2 had P (interaction) 〈 0.0005. Five intergenic region SNPs and two SNPs of the EVC and KCNIP4 genes had P (interaction) 〈 0.00003(.) In IPA analysis of genes with nominal interactions with smoking, axonal guidance signaling genes were significantly overrepresented canonical pathways. Genes contributing to the axon guidance signaling pathway included the SLIT/ROBO signaling genes that were frequently altered in pancreatic cancer. These observations need to be confirmed in additional data set. Once
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24419231
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  • 8
    Keywords: PATHWAYS ; DISEASES ; NF-KAPPA-B ; VARIANTS ; MUTATIONS ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MISSING HERITABILITY ; POWERFUL
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are potentially alterable risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Genetic factors that modify the associations of obesity and diabetes with pancreatic cancer have previously not been examined at the genome-wide level. METHODS: Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) genotype and risk factor data from the Pancreatic Cancer Case Control Consortium, we conducted a discovery study of 2,028 cases and 2,109 controls to examine gene-obesity and gene-diabetes interactions in relation to pancreatic cancer risk by using the likelihood-ratio test nested in logistic regression models and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). RESULTS: After adjusting for multiple comparisons, a significant interaction of the chemokine signaling pathway with obesity (P = 3.29 x 10(-6)) and a near significant interaction of calcium signaling pathway with diabetes (P = 1.57 x 10(-4)) in modifying the risk of pancreatic cancer were observed. These findings were supported by results from IPA analysis of the top genes with nominal interactions. The major contributing genes to the two top pathways include GNGT2, RELA, TIAM1, and GNAS. None of the individual genes or single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) except one SNP remained significant after adjusting for multiple testing. Notably, SNP rs10818684 of the PTGS1 gene showed an interaction with diabetes (P = 7.91 x 10(-7)) at a false discovery rate of 6%. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic variations in inflammatory response and insulin resistance may affect the risk of obesity- and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer. These observations should be replicated in additional large datasets. IMPACT: A gene-environment interaction analysis may provide new insights into the genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms of obesity- and diabetes-related pancreatic cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24136929
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