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  • Male  (18)
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (18)
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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-08-01
    Description: Self-renewal is the hallmark feature both of normal stem cells and cancer stem cells. Since the regenerative capacity of normal haematopoietic stem cells is limited by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks, we speculated that DNA damage might also constrain leukaemic self-renewal and malignant haematopoiesis. Here we show that the histone methyl-transferase MLL4, a suppressor of B-cell lymphoma, is required for stem-cell activity and an aggressive form of acute myeloid leukaemia harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene. Deletion of MLL4 enhances myelopoiesis and myeloid differentiation of leukaemic blasts, which protects mice from death related to acute myeloid leukaemia. MLL4 exerts its function by regulating transcriptional programs associated with the antioxidant response. Addition of reactive oxygen species scavengers or ectopic expression of FOXO3 protects MLL4(-/-) MLL-AF9 cells from DNA damage and inhibits myeloid maturation. Similar to MLL4 deficiency, loss of ATM or BRCA1 sensitizes transformed cells to differentiation, suggesting that myeloid differentiation is promoted by loss of genome integrity. Indeed, we show that restriction-enzyme-induced double-strand breaks are sufficient to induce differentiation of MLL-AF9 blasts, which requires cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip1) (Cdkn1a) activity. In summary, we have uncovered an unexpected tumour-promoting role of genome guardians in enforcing the oncogene-induced differentiation blockade in acute myeloid leukaemia.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4410707/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4410707/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Santos, Margarida A -- Faryabi, Robert B -- Ergen, Aysegul V -- Day, Amanda M -- Malhowski, Amy -- Canela, Andres -- Onozawa, Masahiro -- Lee, Ji-Eun -- Callen, Elsa -- Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula -- Chen, Hua-Tang -- Wong, Nancy -- Finkel, Nadia -- Deshpande, Aniruddha -- Sharrow, Susan -- Rossi, Derrick J -- Ito, Keisuke -- Ge, Kai -- Aplan, Peter D -- Armstrong, Scott A -- Nussenzweig, Andre -- CA140575/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA66996/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA008748/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R00 CA139009/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK098263/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK100689/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 2;514(7520):107-11. doi: 10.1038/nature13483. Epub 2014 Jul 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA [2]. ; The Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Laboratory of Endocrinology and Receptor Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program and Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Experimental Immunology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research, Departments of Cell Biology and Medicine, Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25079327" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins/metabolism ; BRCA1 Protein/genetics/metabolism ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21/metabolism ; DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded ; *DNA Damage ; DNA Repair ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genes, BRCA1 ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/cytology/metabolism/pathology ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/*enzymology/*pathology ; Male ; Mice ; *Myelopoiesis ; Oncogene Proteins, Fusion/genetics/metabolism ; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-11-13
    Description: The role of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in metastasis is a longstanding source of debate, largely owing to an inability to monitor transient and reversible EMT phenotypes in vivo. Here we establish an EMT lineage-tracing system to monitor this process in mice, using a mesenchymal-specific Cre-mediated fluorescent marker switch system in spontaneous breast-to-lung metastasis models. We show that within a predominantly epithelial primary tumour, a small proportion of tumour cells undergo EMT. Notably, lung metastases mainly consist of non-EMT tumour cells that maintain their epithelial phenotype. Inhibiting EMT by overexpressing the microRNA miR-200 does not affect lung metastasis development. However, EMT cells significantly contribute to recurrent lung metastasis formation after chemotherapy. These cells survived cyclophosphamide treatment owing to reduced proliferation, apoptotic tolerance and increased expression of chemoresistance-related genes. Overexpression of miR-200 abrogated this resistance. This study suggests the potential of an EMT-targeting strategy, in conjunction with conventional chemotherapies, for breast cancer treatment.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662610/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662610/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Fischer, Kari R -- Durrans, Anna -- Lee, Sharrell -- Sheng, Jianting -- Li, Fuhai -- Wong, Stephen T C -- Choi, Hyejin -- El Rayes, Tina -- Ryu, Seongho -- Troeger, Juliane -- Schwabe, Robert F -- Vahdat, Linda T -- Altorki, Nasser K -- Mittal, Vivek -- Gao, Dingcheng -- 1 F31 CA186510-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- F31 CA186510/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA135417/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA188388/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 CA149196-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 26;527(7579):472-6. doi: 10.1038/nature15748. Epub 2015 Nov 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Neuberger Berman Lung Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Systems Medicine and Bioengineering, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Methodist Cancer Center, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, 77030 USA. ; Soonchunhyang Institute of Medi-bio Science (SIMS), Soonchunhyang University, 25 Bongjeong-ro Cheonan-Si, Chungcheongnam-do 31151, South Korea. ; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Institute of Human Nutrition, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26560033" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Apoptosis/drug effects ; Cell Lineage ; Cell Proliferation/drug effects ; Cell Tracking ; Cyclophosphamide/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Disease Models, Animal ; Disease Progression ; *Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects/genetics ; *Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/drug effects/genetics ; Female ; Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics/*pathology/*secondary ; Male ; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*drug therapy/genetics/*pathology ; Mice ; MicroRNAs/genetics ; Neoplasm Metastasis/drug therapy/genetics/*pathology ; Reproducibility of Results
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-08-24
    Description: Mutations generate sequence diversity and provide a substrate for selection. The rate of de novo mutations is therefore of major importance to evolution. Here we conduct a study of genome-wide mutation rates by sequencing the entire genomes of 78 Icelandic parent-offspring trios at high coverage. We show that in our samples, with an average father's age of 29.7, the average de novo mutation rate is 1.20 x 10(-8) per nucleotide per generation. Most notably, the diversity in mutation rate of single nucleotide polymorphisms is dominated by the age of the father at conception of the child. The effect is an increase of about two mutations per year. An exponential model estimates paternal mutations doubling every 16.5 years. After accounting for random Poisson variation, father's age is estimated to explain nearly all of the remaining variation in the de novo mutation counts. These observations shed light on the importance of the father's age on the risk of diseases such as schizophrenia and autism.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3548427/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3548427/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kong, Augustine -- Frigge, Michael L -- Masson, Gisli -- Besenbacher, Soren -- Sulem, Patrick -- Magnusson, Gisli -- Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A -- Sigurdsson, Asgeir -- Jonasdottir, Aslaug -- Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg -- Wong, Wendy S W -- Sigurdsson, Gunnar -- Walters, G Bragi -- Steinberg, Stacy -- Helgason, Hannes -- Thorleifsson, Gudmar -- Gudbjartsson, Daniel F -- Helgason, Agnar -- Magnusson, Olafur Th -- Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur -- Stefansson, Kari -- MH071425/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH071425/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 23;488(7412):471-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11396.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉deCODE Genetics, Sturlugata 8, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. kong@decode.is〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22914163" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Autistic Disorder/epidemiology/etiology/*genetics ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; Female ; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Humans ; Iceland/epidemiology ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Mothers ; *Mutation Rate ; Ovum/metabolism ; *Paternal Age ; Pedigree ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Risk Factors ; Schizophrenia/epidemiology/etiology/*genetics ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Spermatozoa/metabolism ; Young Adult
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-08-30
    Description: Without an approved vaccine or treatments, Ebola outbreak management has been limited to palliative care and barrier methods to prevent transmission. These approaches, however, have yet to end the 2014 outbreak of Ebola after its prolonged presence in West Africa. Here we show that a combination of monoclonal antibodies (ZMapp), optimized from two previous antibody cocktails, is able to rescue 100% of rhesus macaques when treatment is initiated up to 5 days post-challenge. High fever, viraemia and abnormalities in blood count and blood chemistry were evident in many animals before ZMapp intervention. Advanced disease, as indicated by elevated liver enzymes, mucosal haemorrhages and generalized petechia could be reversed, leading to full recovery. ELISA and neutralizing antibody assays indicate that ZMapp is cross-reactive with the Guinean variant of Ebola. ZMapp exceeds the efficacy of any other therapeutics described so far, and results warrant further development of this cocktail for clinical use.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4214273/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4214273/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Qiu, Xiangguo -- Wong, Gary -- Audet, Jonathan -- Bello, Alexander -- Fernando, Lisa -- Alimonti, Judie B -- Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues -- Wei, Haiyan -- Aviles, Jenna -- Hiatt, Ernie -- Johnson, Ashley -- Morton, Josh -- Swope, Kelsi -- Bohorov, Ognian -- Bohorova, Natasha -- Goodman, Charles -- Kim, Do -- Pauly, Michael H -- Velasco, Jesus -- Pettitt, James -- Olinger, Gene G -- Whaley, Kevin -- Xu, Bianli -- Strong, James E -- Zeitlin, Larry -- Kobinger, Gary P -- U19 AI109762/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19AI109762/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 2;514(7520):47-53. doi: 10.1038/nature13777. Epub 2014 Aug 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada. ; 1] National Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada [2] Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0J9, Canada. ; 1] National Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada [2] Institute of Infectious Disease, Henan Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhengzhou, 450012 Henan, China. ; Kentucky BioProcessing, Owensboro, Kentucky 42301, USA. ; Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., San Diego, California 92121, USA. ; 1] United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA [2] Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. ; Institute of Infectious Disease, Henan Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhengzhou, 450012 Henan, China. ; 1] National Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada [2] Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0J9, Canada [3] Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1S1, Canada. ; 1] National Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 3R2, Canada [2] Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0J9, Canada [3] Department of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0T5, Canada [4] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25171469" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology/*therapeutic use ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology/therapeutic use ; Antibodies, Viral/immunology/*therapeutic use ; Cross Reactions/immunology ; Ebolavirus/immunology ; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay ; Female ; Guinea ; Guinea Pigs ; Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/blood/*drug therapy/immunology/virology ; *Immunization, Passive ; Macaca mulatta/immunology/virology ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Sequence Alignment ; Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry/immunology ; Viremia/drug therapy/immunology/virology
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are among the most common genetic alterations in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), a deadly liver cancer. Mutant IDH proteins in IHCC and other malignancies acquire an abnormal enzymatic activity allowing them to convert alpha-ketoglutarate (alphaKG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which inhibits the activity of multiple alphaKG-dependent dioxygenases, and results in alterations in cell differentiation, survival, and extracellular matrix maturation. However, the molecular pathways by which IDH mutations lead to tumour formation remain unclear. Here we show that mutant IDH blocks liver progenitor cells from undergoing hepatocyte differentiation through the production of 2HG and suppression of HNF-4alpha, a master regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. Correspondingly, genetically engineered mouse models expressing mutant IDH in the adult liver show an aberrant response to hepatic injury, characterized by HNF-4alpha silencing, impaired hepatocyte differentiation, and markedly elevated levels of cell proliferation. Moreover, IDH and Kras mutations, genetic alterations that co-exist in a subset of human IHCCs, cooperate to drive the expansion of liver progenitor cells, development of premalignant biliary lesions, and progression to metastatic IHCC. These studies provide a functional link between IDH mutations, hepatic cell fate, and IHCC pathogenesis, and present a novel genetically engineered mouse model of IDH-driven malignancy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499230/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499230/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Saha, Supriya K -- Parachoniak, Christine A -- Ghanta, Krishna S -- Fitamant, Julien -- Ross, Kenneth N -- Najem, Mortada S -- Gurumurthy, Sushma -- Akbay, Esra A -- Sia, Daniela -- Cornella, Helena -- Miltiadous, Oriana -- Walesky, Chad -- Deshpande, Vikram -- Zhu, Andrew X -- Hezel, Aram F -- Yen, Katharine E -- Straley, Kimberly S -- Travins, Jeremy -- Popovici-Muller, Janeta -- Gliser, Camelia -- Ferrone, Cristina R -- Apte, Udayan -- Llovet, Josep M -- Wong, Kwok-Kin -- Ramaswamy, Sridhar -- Bardeesy, Nabeel -- P50 CA127003/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA1270003/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA136567/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK098414/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01CA136567-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 4;513(7516):110-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13441. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [2]. ; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] HCC Translational Research Laboratory, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer Group, Liver Unit, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain [2] Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program, Division of Liver Diseases, Dept of Medicine. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York 10029, USA [3] Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, National Cancer Institute, and Department of Experimental Oncology, Milan 20133, Italy. ; HCC Translational Research Laboratory, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer Group, Liver Unit, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain. ; Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program, Division of Liver Diseases, Dept of Medicine. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York 10029, USA. ; Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160, USA. ; University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York 14642, USA. ; Agios Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] HCC Translational Research Laboratory, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer Group, Liver Unit, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain [2] Mount Sinai Liver Cancer Program, Division of Liver Diseases, Dept of Medicine. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York 10029, USA [3] Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Barcelona, Catalonia 08010, Spain [4] University of Barcelona, Catalonia 08036, Spain. ; 1] Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA [2] Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043045" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bile Duct Neoplasms/enzymology/genetics/*pathology ; Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic/enzymology/pathology ; Cell Differentiation/*genetics ; Cell Division/genetics ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; Cholangiocarcinoma/enzymology/genetics/*pathology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Female ; Glutarates/metabolism ; Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4/*antagonists & ; inhibitors/biosynthesis/genetics/metabolism ; Hepatocytes/enzymology/metabolism/*pathology ; Humans ; Isocitrate Dehydrogenase/*genetics/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mutation/genetics ; Neoplasm Metastasis ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Stem Cells/pathology ; ras Proteins/genetics/metabolism
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-04-18
    Description: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by phagocytes are essential for host defence against bacterial and fungal infections. Individuals with defective ROS production machinery develop chronic granulomatous disease. Conversely, excessive ROS can cause collateral tissue damage during inflammatory processes and therefore needs to be tightly regulated. Here we describe a protein, we termed negative regulator of ROS (NRROS), which limits ROS generation by phagocytes during inflammatory responses. NRROS expression in phagocytes can be repressed by inflammatory signals. NRROS-deficient phagocytes produce increased ROS upon inflammatory challenges, and mice lacking NRROS in their phagocytes show enhanced bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes. Conversely, these mice develop severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis owing to oxidative tissue damage in the central nervous system. Mechanistically, NRROS is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it directly interacts with nascent NOX2 (also known as gp91(phox) and encoded by Cybb) monomer, one of the membrane-bound subunits of the NADPH oxidase complex, and facilitates the degradation of NOX2 through the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation pathway. Thus, NRROS provides a hitherto undefined mechanism for regulating ROS production--one that enables phagocytes to produce higher amounts of ROS, if required to control invading pathogens, while minimizing unwanted collateral tissue damage.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Noubade, Rajkumar -- Wong, Kit -- Ota, Naruhisa -- Rutz, Sascha -- Eidenschenk, Celine -- Valdez, Patricia A -- Ding, Jiabing -- Peng, Ivan -- Sebrell, Andrew -- Caplazi, Patrick -- DeVoss, Jason -- Soriano, Robert H -- Sai, Tao -- Lu, Rongze -- Modrusan, Zora -- Hackney, Jason -- Ouyang, Wenjun -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 8;509(7499):235-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13152. Epub 2014 Apr 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Immunology, Genentech Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA [2] Flexus Biosciences, 75 Shoreway Road, Suite D, San Carlos, California 94070, USA (R.N.); American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 11200 Rockville Pike, Suite 302, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA (P.A.V.). ; Department of Immunology, Genentech Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Antibody Engineering, Genentech Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Genentech Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Genentech Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Bioinformatics, Genentech Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24739962" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autoimmunity/genetics ; Bone Marrow Cells/cytology ; Central Nervous System/metabolism/pathology ; Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental/*immunology/*metabolism/pathology ; Endoplasmic Reticulum/enzymology/metabolism ; Escherichia coli/*immunology ; Female ; Inflammation/immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Listeria monocytogenes/*immunology ; Macrophages/cytology/enzymology/immunology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; NADPH Oxidase/metabolism ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Oxidative Stress ; Phagocytes/cytology/immunology/metabolism ; Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Reactive Oxygen Species/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-08-27
    Description: The GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9orf72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To elucidate the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a tractable genetic system, we generated transgenic fly lines expressing 8, 28 or 58 G4C2-repeat-containing transcripts that do not have a translation start site (AUG) but contain an open-reading frame for green fluorescent protein to detect repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. We show that these transgenic animals display dosage-dependent, repeat-length-dependent degeneration in neuronal tissues and RAN translation of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, as observed in patients with C9orf72-related disease. This model was used in a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen, ultimately leading to the identification of 18 genetic modifiers that encode components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), as well as the machinery that coordinates the export of nuclear RNA and the import of nuclear proteins. Consistent with these results, we found morphological abnormalities in the architecture of the nuclear envelope in cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified a substantial defect in RNA export resulting in retention of RNA in the nuclei of Drosophila cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats and also in mammalian cells, including aged induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived neurons from patients with C9orf72-related disease. These studies show that a primary consequence of G4C2 repeat expansion is the compromise of nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore, revealing a novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4631399/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4631399/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Freibaum, Brian D -- Lu, Yubing -- Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo -- Kim, Nam Chul -- Almeida, Sandra -- Lee, Kyung-Ha -- Badders, Nisha -- Valentine, Marc -- Miller, Bruce L -- Wong, Philip C -- Petrucelli, Leonard -- Kim, Hong Joo -- Gao, Fen-Biao -- Taylor, J Paul -- AG019724/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- N079725/PHS HHS/ -- NS079725/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P01 AG019724/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS057553/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS079725/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Sep 3;525(7567):129-33. doi: 10.1038/nature14974. Epub 2015 Aug 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA. ; Department of Neurology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA. ; Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. ; Department of Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32224, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308899" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus/*genetics ; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics/pathology ; Animals ; Animals, Genetically Modified ; DNA Repeat Expansion/*genetics ; Drosophila melanogaster/*cytology/genetics/*metabolism ; Eye/metabolism ; Female ; Frontotemporal Dementia/genetics/pathology ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Muscles/cytology/metabolism ; Neurons/cytology/metabolism ; Nuclear Pore/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Open Reading Frames/*genetics ; Phenotype ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteins/*genetics ; RNA/genetics/metabolism ; RNA Transport/*genetics ; Salivary Glands/cytology/metabolism/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-04-04
    Description: 〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4544703/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4544703/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉van der Lee, Sven J -- Holstege, Henne -- Wong, Tsz Hang -- Jakobsdottir, Johanna -- Bis, Joshua C -- Chouraki, Vincent -- van Rooij, Jeroen G J -- Grove, Megan L -- Smith, Albert V -- Amin, Najaf -- Choi, Seung-Hoan -- Beiser, Alexa S -- Garcia, Melissa E -- van IJcken, Wilfred F J -- Pijnenburg, Yolande A L -- Louwersheimer, Eva -- Brouwer, Rutger W W -- van den Hout, Mirjam C G N -- Oole, Edwin -- Eirkisdottir, Gudny -- Levy, Daniel -- Rotter, Jerome I -- Emilsson, Valur -- O'Donnell, Christopher J -- Aspelund, Thor -- Uitterlinden, Andre G -- Launer, Lenore J -- Hofman, Albert -- Boerwinkle, Eric -- Psaty, Bruce M -- DeStefano, Anita L -- Scheltens, Philip -- Seshadri, Sudha -- van Swieten, John C -- Gudnason, Vilmundur -- van der Flier, Wiesje M -- Ikram, M Arfan -- van Duijn, Cornelia M -- R01 HL105756/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 2;520(7545):E2-3. doi: 10.1038/nature14038.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands. ; 1] Alzheimer Center, Department of Neurology, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 HZ, The Netherlands [2] Department of Clinical Genetics, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 HZ, The Netherlands. ; Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands. ; Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur 201, Iceland. ; Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA. ; 1] National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts 01702-5827, USA [2] Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. ; Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands. ; School of Public Health, Human Genetics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur 201, Iceland [2] Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik 101, Iceland. ; 1] National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts 01702-5827, USA [2] Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. ; Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Center for Biomics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands. ; Alzheimer Center, Department of Neurology, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 HZ, The Netherlands. ; 1] National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts 01702-5827, USA [2] Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA [3] National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California 90502, USA. ; 1] Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur 201, Iceland [2] Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik 101, Iceland. ; 1] National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts 01702-5827, USA [2] National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur 201, Iceland [2] Centre for Public Health, University of Iceland, Reykjavik 101, Iceland. ; 1] Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands [2] Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands [3] Netherlands Consortium on Health Aging and National Genomics Initiative, Leiden 2300 RC, The Netherlands. ; 1] School of Public Health, Human Genetics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA [3] Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington 98101-1448, USA. ; 1] Alzheimer Center, Department of Neurology, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 HZ, The Netherlands [2] Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands. ; 1] Alzheimer Center, Department of Neurology, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 HZ, The Netherlands [2] Department of Epidemiology &Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam 1081 HZ, The Netherlands. ; 1] Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands [2] Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands [3] Departments of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3000 CA, The Netherlands.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25832410" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alzheimer Disease/*genetics ; Female ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics ; Genetic Variation/*genetics ; Humans ; Male ; Phospholipase D/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-02-04
    Description: Effective clinical management of prostate cancer (PCA) has been challenged by significant intratumoural heterogeneity on the genomic and pathological levels and limited understanding of the genetic elements governing disease progression. Here, we exploited the experimental merits of the mouse to test the hypothesis that pathways constraining progression might be activated in indolent Pten-null mouse prostate tumours and that inactivation of such progression barriers in mice would engender a metastasis-prone condition. Comparative transcriptomic and canonical pathway analyses, followed by biochemical confirmation, of normal prostate epithelium versus poorly progressive Pten-null prostate cancers revealed robust activation of the TGFbeta/BMP-SMAD4 signalling axis. The functional relevance of SMAD4 was further supported by emergence of invasive, metastatic and lethal prostate cancers with 100% penetrance upon genetic deletion of Smad4 in the Pten-null mouse prostate. Pathological and molecular analysis as well as transcriptomic knowledge-based pathway profiling of emerging tumours identified cell proliferation and invasion as two cardinal tumour biological features in the metastatic Smad4/Pten-null PCA model. Follow-on pathological and functional assessment confirmed cyclin D1 and SPP1 as key mediators of these biological processes, which together with PTEN and SMAD4, form a four-gene signature that is prognostic of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biochemical recurrence and lethal metastasis in human PCA. This model-informed progression analysis, together with genetic, functional and translational studies, establishes SMAD4 as a key regulator of PCA progression in mice and humans.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3753179/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3753179/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ding, Zhihu -- Wu, Chang-Jiun -- Chu, Gerald C -- Xiao, Yonghong -- Ho, Dennis -- Zhang, Jingfang -- Perry, Samuel R -- Labrot, Emma S -- Wu, Xiaoqiu -- Lis, Rosina -- Hoshida, Yujin -- Hiller, David -- Hu, Baoli -- Jiang, Shan -- Zheng, Hongwu -- Stegh, Alexander H -- Scott, Kenneth L -- Signoretti, Sabina -- Bardeesy, Nabeel -- Wang, Y Alan -- Hill, David E -- Golub, Todd R -- Stampfer, Meir J -- Wong, Wing H -- Loda, Massimo -- Mucci, Lorelei -- Chin, Lynda -- DePinho, Ronald A -- P50 CA090381/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA090381-08/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA90381/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 5R01CA136578/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA131945/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA131945/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA141298/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01-CA84313/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Feb 10;470(7333):269-73. doi: 10.1038/nature09677. Epub 2011 Feb 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Belfer Institute for Applied Cancer Science, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21289624" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/metabolism ; Cell Proliferation ; Cyclin D1/genetics/metabolism ; *Disease Progression ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor/physiology ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/secondary ; Lymphatic Metastasis ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Transgenic ; Models, Biological ; Neoplasm Invasiveness/genetics/pathology ; Neoplasm Metastasis/genetics/*pathology ; Osteopontin/genetics/metabolism ; PTEN Phosphohydrolase/deficiency/genetics ; Penetrance ; Prognosis ; Prostate/metabolism ; Prostate-Specific Antigen/metabolism ; Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis/genetics/*pathology ; Smad4 Protein/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Transforming Growth Factor beta
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-09-17
    Description: Structural variation is widespread in mammalian genomes and is an important cause of disease, but just how abundant and important structural variants (SVs) are in shaping phenotypic variation remains unclear. Without knowing how many SVs there are, and how they arise, it is difficult to discover what they do. Combining experimental with automated analyses, we identified 711,920 SVs at 281,243 sites in the genomes of thirteen classical and four wild-derived inbred mouse strains. The majority of SVs are less than 1 kilobase in size and 98% are deletions or insertions. The breakpoints of 160,000 SVs were mapped to base pair resolution, allowing us to infer that insertion of retrotransposons causes more than half of SVs. Yet, despite their prevalence, SVs are less likely than other sequence variants to cause gene expression or quantitative phenotypic variation. We identified 24 SVs that disrupt coding exons, acting as rare variants of large effect on gene function. One-third of the genes so affected have immunological functions.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428933/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428933/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yalcin, Binnaz -- Wong, Kim -- Agam, Avigail -- Goodson, Martin -- Keane, Thomas M -- Gan, Xiangchao -- Nellaker, Christoffer -- Goodstadt, Leo -- Nicod, Jerome -- Bhomra, Amarjit -- Hernandez-Pliego, Polinka -- Whitley, Helen -- Cleak, James -- Dutton, Rebekah -- Janowitz, Deborah -- Mott, Richard -- Adams, David J -- Flint, Jonathan -- 079912/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 082356/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 090532/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 13031/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- G0800024/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- MC_U137761446/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Sep 14;477(7364):326-9. doi: 10.1038/nature10432.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21921916" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chromosome Breakpoints ; Exons/genetics ; Female ; Gene Expression ; Genetic Variation/*genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genomics ; Genotype ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred Strains/*genetics/immunology ; Mutagenesis, Insertional/genetics ; *Phenotype ; Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics ; Rats ; Retroelements/genetics ; Sequence Deletion/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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