Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL  (7)
  • Amino Acid Sequence  (6)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-11-11
    Description: Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components by autophagy is essential for cellular survival and homeostasis under nutrient-deprived conditions. Acute regulation of autophagy by nutrient-sensing kinases is well defined, but longer-term transcriptional regulation is relatively unknown. Here we show that the fed-state sensing nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the fasting transcriptional activator cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) coordinately regulate the hepatic autophagy gene network. Pharmacological activation of FXR repressed many autophagy genes and inhibited autophagy even in fasted mice, and feeding-mediated inhibition of macroautophagy was attenuated in FXR-knockout mice. From mouse liver chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing data, FXR and CREB binding peaks were detected at 178 and 112 genes, respectively, out of 230 autophagy-related genes, and 78 genes showed shared binding, mostly in their promoter regions. CREB promoted autophagic degradation of lipids, or lipophagy, under nutrient-deprived conditions, and FXR inhibited this response. Mechanistically, CREB upregulated autophagy genes, including Atg7, Ulk1 and Tfeb, by recruiting the coactivator CRTC2. After feeding or pharmacological activation, FXR trans-repressed these genes by disrupting the functional CREB-CRTC2 complex. This study identifies the new FXR-CREB axis as a key physiological switch regulating autophagy, resulting in sustained nutrient regulation of autophagy during feeding/fasting cycles.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257899/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257899/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seok, Sunmi -- Fu, Ting -- Choi, Sung-E -- Li, Yang -- Zhu, Rong -- Kumar, Subodh -- Sun, Xiaoxiao -- Yoon, Gyesoon -- Kang, Yup -- Zhong, Wenxuan -- Ma, Jian -- Kemper, Byron -- Kemper, Jongsook Kim -- DK62777/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK95842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK062777/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK095842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 4;516(7529):108-11. doi: 10.1038/nature13949. Epub 2014 Nov 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA [2] Institute for Medical Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 442-749, Korea. ; Department of Bioengineering and the Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Statistics, University of Georgia, Athens, Gerogia 30602, USA. ; Institute for Medical Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 442-749, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25383523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autophagy/*genetics ; Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/*metabolism ; Fasting/physiology ; *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects ; Isoxazoles/pharmacology ; Liver/cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Protein Binding ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/agonists/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-04-04
    Description: Comprehensive knowledge of the brain's wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Oh, Seung Wook -- Harris, Julie A -- Ng, Lydia -- Winslow, Brent -- Cain, Nicholas -- Mihalas, Stefan -- Wang, Quanxin -- Lau, Chris -- Kuan, Leonard -- Henry, Alex M -- Mortrud, Marty T -- Ouellette, Benjamin -- Nguyen, Thuc Nghi -- Sorensen, Staci A -- Slaughterbeck, Clifford R -- Wakeman, Wayne -- Li, Yang -- Feng, David -- Ho, Anh -- Nicholas, Eric -- Hirokawa, Karla E -- Bohn, Phillip -- Joines, Kevin M -- Peng, Hanchuan -- Hawrylycz, Michael J -- Phillips, John W -- Hohmann, John G -- Wohnoutka, Paul -- Gerfen, Charles R -- Koch, Christof -- Bernard, Amy -- Dang, Chinh -- Jones, Allan R -- Zeng, Hongkui -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):207-14. doi: 10.1038/nature13186. Epub 2014 Apr 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, Washington 98103, USA [2]. ; Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, Washington 98103, USA. ; Laboratory of Systems Neuroscience, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24695228" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Atlases as Topic ; Axons/physiology ; Brain/*anatomy & histology/*cytology ; Cerebral Cortex/cytology ; *Connectome ; Corpus Striatum/cytology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Neurological ; Neuroanatomical Tract-Tracing Techniques ; Thalamus/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhao, Ling -- Chen, Xiang-Jun -- Zhu, Jie -- Xi, Yi-Bo -- Yang, Xu -- Hu, Li-Dan -- Ouyang, Hong -- Patel, Sherrina H -- Jin, Xin -- Lin, Danni -- Wu, Frances -- Flagg, Ken -- Cai, Huimin -- Li, Gen -- Cao, Guiqun -- Lin, Ying -- Chen, Daniel -- Wen, Cindy -- Chung, Christopher -- Wang, Yandong -- Qiu, Austin -- Yeh, Emily -- Wang, Wenqiu -- Hu, Xun -- Grob, Seanna -- Abagyan, Ruben -- Su, Zhiguang -- Tjondro, Harry Christianto -- Zhao, Xi-Juan -- Luo, Hongrong -- Hou, Rui -- Perry, J Jefferson P -- Gao, Weiwei -- Kozak, Igor -- Granet, David -- Li, Yingrui -- Sun, Xiaodong -- Wang, Jun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Liu, Yizhi -- Yan, Yong-Bin -- Zhang, Kang -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):607-11. doi: 10.1038/nature14650. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] CapitalBio Genomics Co., Ltd., Dongguan 523808, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company, Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 20080, China. ; Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [3] Department of Ophthalmology and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200341" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Amyloid/chemistry/drug effects/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; Cataract/congenital/*drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Cell Line ; Child ; Crystallins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Dogs ; Female ; Humans ; Lanosterol/administration & dosage/*pharmacology/*therapeutic use ; Lens, Crystalline/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Male ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutant Proteins/chemistry/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Pedigree ; Protein Aggregates/*drug effects ; Protein Aggregation, Pathological/*drug therapy/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-05-21
    Description: The transmission of information from DNA to RNA is a critical process. We compared RNA sequences from human B cells of 27 individuals to the corresponding DNA sequences from the same individuals and uncovered more than 10,000 exonic sites where the RNA sequences do not match that of the DNA. All 12 possible categories of discordances were observed. These differences were nonrandom as many sites were found in multiple individuals and in different cell types, including primary skin cells and brain tissues. Using mass spectrometry, we detected peptides that are translated from the discordant RNA sequences and thus do not correspond exactly to the DNA sequences. These widespread RNA-DNA differences in the human transcriptome provide a yet unexplored aspect of genome variation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204392/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Mingyao -- Wang, Isabel X -- Li, Yun -- Bruzel, Alan -- Richards, Allison L -- Toung, Jonathan M -- Cheung, Vivian G -- R01 HG005854/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG005854-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 1;333(6038):53-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1207018. Epub 2011 May 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21596952" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Aged ; Amino Acid Sequence ; B-Lymphocytes ; Base Sequence ; Cell Line ; Cerebral Cortex/cytology ; DNA/chemistry/*genetics ; Exons ; Expressed Sequence Tags ; Fibroblasts ; Gene Expression Profiling ; *Genetic Variation ; *Genome, Human ; Genotype ; Humans ; Mass Spectrometry ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteins/chemistry ; Proteome/chemistry ; RNA, Messenger/chemistry/*genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Skin/cytology ; Untranslated Regions
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-07-28
    Description: The essential bacterial protein FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase that self-assembles into a structure at the division site termed the "Z ring". During cytokinesis, the Z ring exerts a constrictive force on the membrane by using the chemical energy of guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. However, the structural basis of this constriction remains unresolved. Here, we present the crystal structure of a guanosine diphosphate-bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ protofilament, which exhibits a curved conformational state. The structure reveals a longitudinal interface that is important for function. The protofilament curvature highlights a hydrolysis-dependent conformational switch at the T3 loop that leads to longitudinal bending between subunits, which could generate sufficient force to drive cytokinesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816583/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3816583/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Ying -- Hsin, Jen -- Zhao, Lingyun -- Cheng, Yiwen -- Shang, Weina -- Huang, Kerwyn Casey -- Wang, Hong-Wei -- Ye, Sheng -- 1F32GM100677-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD006466/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP2OD006466/OD/NIH HHS/ -- F32 GM100677/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Jul 26;341(6144):392-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1239248.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Life Sciences Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 Zhejiang, P.R. China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23888039" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Membrane/physiology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; *Cytokinesis ; Cytoskeletal Proteins/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Escherichia coli/chemistry ; Guanosine Diphosphate/chemistry/metabolism ; Guanosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Hydrolysis ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Dynamics Simulation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mycobacterium tuberculosis/*chemistry/physiology ; Point Mutation ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Subunits/chemistry/metabolism ; Staphylococcus aureus/chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-06-09
    Description: A fundamental feature of the mammalian neocortex is its columnar organization. In the visual cortex, functional columns consisting of neurons with similar orientation preferences have been characterized extensively, but how these columns are constructed during development remains unclear. The radial unit hypothesis posits that the ontogenetic columns formed by clonally related neurons migrating along the same radial glial fibre during corticogenesis provide the basis for functional columns in adult neocortex. However, a direct correspondence between the ontogenetic and functional columns has not been demonstrated. Here we show that, despite the lack of a discernible orientation map in mouse visual cortex, sister neurons in the same radial clone exhibit similar orientation preferences. Using a retroviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein to label radial clones of excitatory neurons, and in vivo two-photon calcium imaging to measure neuronal response properties, we found that sister neurons preferred similar orientations whereas nearby non-sister neurons showed no such relationship. Interestingly, disruption of gap junction coupling by viral expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Cx26 (also known as Gjb2) or by daily administration of a gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, during the first postnatal week greatly diminished the functional similarity between sister neurons, suggesting that the maturation of ontogenetic into functional columns requires intercellular communication through gap junctions. Together with the recent finding of preferential excitatory connections among sister neurons, our results support the radial unit hypothesis and unify the ontogenetic and functional columns in the visual cortex.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375857/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375857/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Ye -- Lu, Hui -- Cheng, Pei-lin -- Ge, Shaoyu -- Xu, Huatai -- Shi, Song-Hai -- Dan, Yang -- R01 DA024681/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018861/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS065915/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R21NS072483/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 2;486(7401):118-21. doi: 10.1038/nature11110.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Neurobiology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22678292" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Animals, Newborn ; Carbenoxolone/pharmacology ; *Cell Communication ; Clone Cells/cytology ; Connexins/genetics/metabolism ; Female ; Gap Junctions/drug effects/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Neurological ; Neurons/*physiology ; Visual Cortex/*cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-02-21
    Description: Crohn's disease is a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can involve the entire digestive tract. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding a missense variant in the autophagy gene ATG16L1 (rs2241880, Thr300Ala) is strongly associated with the incidence of Crohn's disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effect of ATG16L1 deletion or deficiency; however, the molecular consequences of the Thr300Ala (T300A) variant remains unknown. Here we show that amino acids 296-299 constitute a caspase cleavage motif in ATG16L1 and that the T300A variant (T316A in mice) significantly increases ATG16L1 sensitization to caspase-3-mediated processing. We observed that death-receptor activation or starvation-induced metabolic stress in human and murine macrophages increased degradation of the T300A or T316A variants of ATG16L1, respectively, resulting in diminished autophagy. Knock-in mice harbouring the T316A variant showed defective clearance of the ileal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica and an elevated inflammatory cytokine response. In turn, deletion of the caspase-3-encoding gene, Casp3, or elimination of the caspase cleavage site by site-directed mutagenesis rescued starvation-induced autophagy and pathogen clearance, respectively. These findings demonstrate that caspase 3 activation in the presence of a common risk allele leads to accelerated degradation of ATG16L1, placing cellular stress, apoptotic stimuli and impaired autophagy in a unified pathway that predisposes to Crohn's disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Murthy, Aditya -- Li, Yun -- Peng, Ivan -- Reichelt, Mike -- Katakam, Anand Kumar -- Noubade, Rajkumar -- Roose-Girma, Merone -- DeVoss, Jason -- Diehl, Lauri -- Graham, Robert R -- van Lookeren Campagne, Menno -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 27;506(7489):456-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13044. Epub 2014 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; ITGR Human Genetics, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553140" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Autophagy/genetics ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Caspase 3/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Line ; Cells, Cultured ; Crohn Disease/*genetics/pathology ; Cytokines/immunology ; Enzyme Activation ; Female ; Food Deprivation ; Humans ; Macrophages/immunology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics ; *Proteolysis ; Stress, Physiological ; Yersinia enterocolitica/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-03-26
    Description: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent birth defect, affecting nearly 1% of live births; the incidence of CHD is up to tenfold higher in human fetuses. A genetic contribution is strongly suggested by the association of CHD with chromosome abnormalities and high recurrence risk. Here we report findings from a recessive forward genetic screen in fetal mice, showing that cilia and cilia-transduced cell signalling have important roles in the pathogenesis of CHD. The cilium is an evolutionarily conserved organelle projecting from the cell surface with essential roles in diverse cellular processes. Using echocardiography, we ultrasound scanned 87,355 chemically mutagenized C57BL/6J fetal mice and recovered 218 CHD mouse models. Whole-exome sequencing identified 91 recessive CHD mutations in 61 genes. This included 34 cilia-related genes, 16 genes involved in cilia-transduced cell signalling, and 10 genes regulating vesicular trafficking, a pathway important for ciliogenesis and cell signalling. Surprisingly, many CHD genes encoded interacting proteins, suggesting that an interactome protein network may provide a larger genomic context for CHD pathogenesis. These findings provide novel insights into the potential Mendelian genetic contribution to CHD in the fetal population, a segment of the human population not well studied. We note that the pathways identified show overlap with CHD candidate genes recovered in CHD patients, suggesting that they may have relevance to the more complex genetics of CHD overall. These CHD mouse models and 〉8,000 incidental mutations have been sperm archived, creating a rich public resource for human disease modelling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4617540/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4617540/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, You -- Klena, Nikolai T -- Gabriel, George C -- Liu, Xiaoqin -- Kim, Andrew J -- Lemke, Kristi -- Chen, Yu -- Chatterjee, Bishwanath -- Devine, William -- Damerla, Rama Rao -- Chang, Chienfu -- Yagi, Hisato -- San Agustin, Jovenal T -- Thahir, Mohamed -- Anderton, Shane -- Lawhead, Caroline -- Vescovi, Anita -- Pratt, Herbert -- Morgan, Judy -- Haynes, Leslie -- Smith, Cynthia L -- Eppig, Janan T -- Reinholdt, Laura -- Francis, Richard -- Leatherbury, Linda -- Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K -- Tobita, Kimimasa -- Pazour, Gregory J -- Lo, Cecilia W -- HG000330/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM060992/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01MH094564/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL098180/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U01HL098180/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U01HL098188/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 28;521(7553):520-4. doi: 10.1038/nature14269. Epub 2015 Mar 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15201, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA. ; Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA. ; 1] Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206, USA [2] Intelligent Systems Program, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 16260, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609, USA. ; The Heart Center, Children's National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25807483" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cilia/genetics/*pathology/physiology/ultrasonography ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Electrocardiography ; Exome/genetics ; Genes, Recessive ; Genetic Testing ; Heart Defects, Congenital/*genetics/*pathology/ultrasonography ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutation/genetics ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-09-27
    Description: Epigenetic reprogramming of myeloid cells, also known as trained immunity, confers nonspecific protection from secondary infections. Using histone modification profiles of human monocytes trained with the Candida albicans cell wall constituent beta-glucan, together with a genome-wide transcriptome, we identified the induced expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism. Trained monocytes display high glucose consumption, high lactate production, and a high ratio of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to its reduced form (NADH), reflecting a shift in metabolism with an increase in glycolysis dependent on the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through a dectin-1-Akt-HIF-1alpha (hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha) pathway. Inhibition of Akt, mTOR, or HIF-1alpha blocked monocyte induction of trained immunity, whereas the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activator metformin inhibited the innate immune response to fungal infection. Mice with a myeloid cell-specific defect in HIF-1alpha were unable to mount trained immunity against bacterial sepsis. Our results indicate that induction of aerobic glycolysis through an Akt-mTOR-HIF-1alpha pathway represents the metabolic basis of trained immunity.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4226238/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4226238/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cheng, Shih-Chin -- Quintin, Jessica -- Cramer, Robert A -- Shepardson, Kelly M -- Saeed, Sadia -- Kumar, Vinod -- Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J -- Martens, Joost H A -- Rao, Nagesha Appukudige -- Aghajanirefah, Ali -- Manjeri, Ganesh R -- Li, Yang -- Ifrim, Daniela C -- Arts, Rob J W -- van der Veer, Brian M J W -- Deen, Peter M T -- Logie, Colin -- O'Neill, Luke A -- Willems, Peter -- van de Veerdonk, Frank L -- van der Meer, Jos W M -- Ng, Aylwin -- Joosten, Leo A B -- Wijmenga, Cisca -- Stunnenberg, Hendrik G -- Xavier, Ramnik J -- Netea, Mihai G -- 1P30GM106394-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- 5P30GM103415-03/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- DK097485/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK43351/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK043351/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 GM103415/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30 GM106394/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI081838/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK097485/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01AI81838/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Sep 26;345(6204):1250684. doi: 10.1126/science.1250684.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Faculties of Science and Medicine, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University, 6500 HB Nijmegen, Netherlands. ; Department of Genetics, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands. ; 4th Department of Internal Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, 12462 Athens, Greece. ; Department of Biochemistry, Faculties of Science and Medicine, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University, 6500 HB Nijmegen, Netherlands. ; Department of Physiology, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands. ; School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; Center for Computational and Integrative Biology and Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands. mihai.netea@radboudumc.nl.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25258083" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aerobiosis/immunology ; Animals ; Candida albicans/immunology ; Candidiasis/immunology/metabolism ; Disease Models, Animal ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; Glucose/metabolism ; Glycolysis/*immunology ; Humans ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics/*metabolism ; Immunity, Innate/*genetics ; Immunologic Memory/*genetics ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Monocytes/*immunology/metabolism ; Sepsis/genetics/immunology/metabolism ; Staphylococcal Infections/immunology/metabolism ; Staphylococcus aureus ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcriptome ; beta-Glucans/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...