Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-05-07
    Description: Parabiosis experiments indicate that impaired regeneration in aged mice is reversible by exposure to a young circulation, suggesting that young blood contains humoral "rejuvenating" factors that can restore regenerative function. Here, we demonstrate that the circulating protein growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) is a rejuvenating factor for skeletal muscle. Supplementation of systemic GDF11 levels, which normally decline with age, by heterochronic parabiosis or systemic delivery of recombinant protein, reversed functional impairments and restored genomic integrity in aged muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Increased GDF11 levels in aged mice also improved muscle structural and functional features and increased strength and endurance exercise capacity. These data indicate that GDF11 systemically regulates muscle aging and may be therapeutically useful for reversing age-related skeletal muscle and stem cell dysfunction.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4104429/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4104429/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sinha, Manisha -- Jang, Young C -- Oh, Juhyun -- Khong, Danika -- Wu, Elizabeth Y -- Manohar, Rohan -- Miller, Christine -- Regalado, Samuel G -- Loffredo, Francesco S -- Pancoast, James R -- Hirshman, Michael F -- Lebowitz, Jessica -- Shadrach, Jennifer L -- Cerletti, Massimiliano -- Kim, Mi-Jeong -- Serwold, Thomas -- Goodyear, Laurie J -- Rosner, Bernard -- Lee, Richard T -- Wagers, Amy J -- 1DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 5U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P30 AG038072/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG032977/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR042238/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR42238/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 DE007057/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 9;344(6184):649-52. doi: 10.1126/science.1251152. Epub 2014 May 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Harvard Stem Cell Institute and Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24797481" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Aging/blood/drug effects/*physiology ; Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/administration & dosage/blood/*physiology ; Growth Differentiation Factors/administration & dosage/blood/*physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Muscle, Skeletal/*blood supply/drug effects/*physiology ; Myoblasts, Skeletal/drug effects/*physiology ; Parabiosis ; *Regeneration ; *Rejuvenation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-05-07
    Description: In the adult central nervous system, the vasculature of the neurogenic niche regulates neural stem cell behavior by providing circulating and secreted factors. Age-related decline of neurogenesis and cognitive function is associated with reduced blood flow and decreased numbers of neural stem cells. Therefore, restoring the functionality of the niche should counteract some of the negative effects of aging. We show that factors found in young blood induce vascular remodeling, culminating in increased neurogenesis and improved olfactory discrimination in aging mice. Further, we show that GDF11 alone can improve the cerebral vasculature and enhance neurogenesis. The identification of factors that slow the age-dependent deterioration of the neurogenic niche in mice may constitute the basis for new methods of treating age-related neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123747/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123747/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Katsimpardi, Lida -- Litterman, Nadia K -- Schein, Pamela A -- Miller, Christine M -- Loffredo, Francesco S -- Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R -- Chen, John W -- Lee, Richard T -- Wagers, Amy J -- Rubin, Lee L -- 1DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 5U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG032977/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS070835/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS072167/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS070835/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS072167/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 9;344(6184):630-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1251141. Epub 2014 May 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24797482" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/*drug effects ; Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*administration & dosage/blood/physiology ; Brain/blood supply/*drug effects ; Cerebrovascular Circulation/*drug effects ; Cognition/drug effects ; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/drug effects ; Growth Differentiation Factors/*administration & dosage/blood/physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neural Stem Cells/cytology/*drug effects ; Neurogenesis/*drug effects ; Olfactory Bulb/cytology/drug effects ; Parabiosis ; Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage ; *Rejuvenation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-03-06
    Description: Protective T-cell memory has long been thought to reside in blood and lymph nodes, but recently the concept of immune memory in peripheral tissues mediated by resident memory T (T(RM)) cells has been proposed. Here we show in mice that localized vaccinia virus (VACV) skin infection generates long-lived non-recirculating CD8(+) skin T(RM) cells that reside within the entire skin. These skin T(RM) cells are potent effector cells, and are superior to circulating central memory T (T(CM)) cells at providing rapid long-term protection against cutaneous re-infection. We find that CD8(+) T cells are rapidly recruited to skin after acute VACV infection. CD8(+) T-cell recruitment to skin is independent of CD4(+) T cells and interferon-gamma, but requires the expression of E- and P-selectin ligands by CD8(+) T cells. Using parabiotic mice, we further show that circulating CD8(+) T(CM) and CD8(+) skin T(RM) cells are both generated after skin infection; however, CD8(+) T(CM) cells recirculate between blood and lymph nodes whereas T(RM) cells remain in the skin. Cutaneous CD8(+) T(RM) cells produce effector cytokines and persist for at least 6 months after infection. Mice with CD8(+) skin T(RM) cells rapidly cleared a subsequent re-infection with VACV whereas mice with circulating T(CM) but no skin T(RM) cells showed greatly impaired viral clearance, indicating that T(RM) cells provide superior protection. Finally, we show that T(RM) cells generated as a result of localized VACV skin infection reside not only in the site of infection, but also populate the entire skin surface and remain present for many months. Repeated re-infections lead to progressive accumulation of highly protective T(RM) cells in non-involved skin. These findings have important implications for our understanding of protective immune memory at epithelial interfaces with the environment, and suggest novel strategies for vaccines that protect against tissue tropic organisms.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3437663/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3437663/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jiang, Xiaodong -- Clark, Rachael A -- Liu, Luzheng -- Wagers, Amy J -- Fuhlbrigge, Robert C -- Kupper, Thomas S -- R01 AI025082/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI041707/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI097128/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR056720/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR065807/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01AI041707/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37AI025082/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- TR01AI097128/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 29;483(7388):227-31. doi: 10.1038/nature10851.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Dermatology and Harvard Skin Disease Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22388819" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*cytology/*immunology ; Cell Movement ; E-Selectin/metabolism ; Female ; Immunologic Memory/*immunology ; Interferon-gamma ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Immunological ; P-Selectin/metabolism ; Skin/*immunology/metabolism/*virology ; Vaccinia/immunology/virology ; Vaccinia virus/immunology/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...