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  • 1
    Keywords: CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; INHIBITION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; COMPLEX ; MECHANISM ; DOMAIN ; FORM ; PARTICLES ; DEGRADATION ; ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY ; HIV-1 VIF ; LEUKEMIA-VIRUS ; VIF ; 2 DISTINCT ; ANTIRETROVIRAL DEFENSE ; CYTIDINE DEAMINASES ; EDITING ENZYME APOBEC3G ; MURINE APOBEC3 ; SOCS-BOX ; TYPE-1 VIF
    Abstract: The APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases are part of the intrinsic defense of cells against retroviruses. Lentiviruses and spumaviruses have evolved essential accessory proteins, Vif and Bet, respectively, which counteract the APOBEC3 proteins. We show here that Bet of the Prototype foamy virus inhibits the antiviral APOBEC3C activity by a mechanism distinct to Vif: Bet forms a complex with APOBEC3C without inducing its degradation. Bet abolished APOBEC3C dimerization as shown by co-immunoprecipitation and cross-linking experiments. These findings implicate a physical interaction between Bet and the APOBEC3C. Subsequently, we identified the Bet interaction domain in human APOBEC3C in the predicted APOBEC3C dimerization site. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that Bet inhibits incorporation of APOBEC3Cs into retroviral particles. Bet likely achieves this by trapping APOBEC3C protein in complexes rendering them unavailable for newly generated viruses due to direct immobilization
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19074429
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  • 2
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; RNA ; SIGNAL ; PARTICLES ; VECTORS ; foamy virus ; INFECTIVITY ; MURINE LEUKEMIA-VIRUS ; capsid assembly ; FUSION PROTEIN ; REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION ; C-TERMINUS ; Gag-Pol fusion protein ; Pol processing ; POLYPROTEIN ; retroviral morphogenesis
    Abstract: Background: Foamy viruses (FVs) unlike orthoretroviruses express Pol as a separate precursor protein and not as a Gag Pol fusion protein. A unique packaging strategy, involving recognition of briding viral RNA by both Pol precursor and Gag as well as potential Gag-Pol protein interactions, ensures Pol particle encapsidation. Results: Several Prototype FV (PFV) Gag-Pol fusion protein constructs were generated to examine whether PFV replication is compatible with an orthoretroviral-like Pol expression. During their analysis, non-particle-associated secreted Pol precursor protein was discovered in extracellular wild type PFV particle preparations of different origin, copurifying in simple virion enrichment protocols. Different analysis methods suggest that extracellular wild type PFV particles contain predominantly mature p85(PR-RT) and p40(IN) Pol subunits. Characterization of various PFV Gag Pol fusion constructs revealed that PFV Pol expression in an orthoretroviral manner is compatible with PFV replication as long as a proteolytic processing between Gag and Pol proteins is possible. PFV Gag-Pol translation by a HIV-1 like ribosomal frameshift signal resulted in production of replication-competent virions, although cell- and particle-associated Pol levels were reduced in comparison to wild type. In-frame fusion of PFV Gag and Pol ORFs led to increased cellular Pol levels, but particle incorporation was only marginally elevated. Unlike that reported for similar orthoretroviral constructs, a full-length in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion construct showed wildtype-like particle release and infectivity characteristics. In contrast, in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion with C-terminal Gag ORF truncations or non-removable Gag peptide addition to Pol displayed wildtype particle release, but reduced particle infectivity. PFV Gag-Pol precursor fusion proteins with inactivated protease were highly deficient in regular particle release, although coexpression of p71(Gag) resulted in a significant copackaging of these proteins. Conclusions: Non-particle associated PFV Pol appears to be naturally released from infected cells by a yet unknown mechanism. The absence of particle-associated Pol precursor suggests its rapid processing upon particle incorporation. Analysis of different PFV Gag-Pol fusion constructs demonstrates that orthoretroviral-like Pol expression is compatible with FV replication in principal as long as fusion protein processing is possible. Furthermore, unlike orthoretroviruses, PFV particle release and infectivity tolerate larger differences in relative cellular Gag/Pol levels
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21843316
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  • 3
    Keywords: PEPTIDE ; Germany ; MICROSCOPY ; PATHWAY ; PATHWAYS ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; RELEASE ; DOMAIN ; CONTRAST ; SEQUENCE ; PARTICLES ; virus ; MUTATION ; LINE ; inactivation ; OVEREXPRESSION ; MATRIX PROTEIN ; VIRION RELEASE ; electron microscopy ; MORPHOGENESIS ; ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY ; assembly ; AMINO-ACID ; interaction ; MUTANTS ; STRUCTURAL PROTEINS ; ENV ; VIRAL INFECTIVITY ; ENVELOPE GLYCOPROTEIN ; ROUS-SARCOMA VIRUS ; TSG101
    Abstract: Foamy viruses (FV) are unusual among retroviruses since they require both Gag and Env structural proteins for particle egress. Recently significant progress has been made towards the mechanistic understanding of the viral release process, in particular that of retroviruses, and the viral domains and cellular pathways involved. However little is currently known about domains of FV structural proteins and cellular proteins engaged in this process. By mutational analysis of sequence motifs in prototype FV (PFV) Gag, bearing homology to known late assembly (L) domains, a PSAP motif with L domain function that was functionally interchangeable by heterologous L domains was identified. In contrast the inactivation of a PPPI motif had no significant influence on PFV particle release, although mutant viral particles displayed reduced infectivity. Similarly mutation of an evolutionary conserved YXXL motif revealed no classical L-domain function but resulted in release of noninfectious viruslike particles. Biochemical and electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that these mutant particles incorporated all viral structural proteins but contained aberrantly capsid structures, suggesting a role in capsid assembly for this PFV Gag sequence motif. In line with the mutational analysis, overexpression of dominant negative (DN) mutants and wild-type TSG101 but not the DN mutant of AIP-1/ALIX reduced PFV particle release and infectivity. Furthermore, DN mutants of Vps4A, Vps4B, and CHMP3 inhibited PFV egress and infectivity. Taken together these results demonstrate that PFV, like other viruses, requires components of the vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) machinery for egress and enters the VPS pathway through interaction with TSG101
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15827161
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  • 4
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; IN-VITRO ; CELL ; Germany ; MICROSCOPY ; VITRO ; imaging ; screening ; TOOL ; VISUALIZATION ; GENE ; GENOME ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; LINES ; TRANSDUCTION ; gene transfer ; GENE-TRANSFER ; DOMAIN ; CONTRAST ; BINDING ; CELL-LINES ; CYCLE ; GLYCOPROTEIN ; PARTICLES ; TARGET ; virus ; IDENTIFICATION ; VECTOR ; PLASMA ; MEMBRANE ; CELL-LINE ; LINE ; REPLICATION ; INFECTIVITY ; GAG PROTEIN ; cell lines ; MEMBRANES ; ORIGIN ; FEATURES ; DETERMINANTS ; assembly ; plasma membrane ; TERMINUS ; RANGE ; COEXPRESSION ; Lead ; Type ; FAK ; RED FLUORESCENT PROTEIN ; TAG
    Abstract: Background: The foamy virus (FV) replication cycle displays several unique features, which set them apart from orthoretroviruses. First, like other B/D type orthoretroviruses, FV capsids preassemble at the centrosome, but more similar to hepadnaviruses, FV budding is strictly dependent on cognate viral glycoprotein coexpression. Second, the unusually broad host range of FV is thought to be due to use of a very common entry receptor present on host cell plasma membranes, because all cell lines tested in vitro so far are permissive. Results: In order to take advantage of modern fluorescent microscopy techniques to study FV replication, we have created FV Gag proteins bearing a variety of protein tags and evaluated these for their ability to support various steps of FV replication. Addition of even small N-terminal HA-tags to FV Gag severely impaired FV particle release. For example, release was completely abrogated by an N-terminal autofluorescent protein (AFP) fusion, despite apparently normal intracellular capsid assembly. In contrast, C-terminal Gag-tags had only minor effects on particle assembly, egress and particle morphogenesis. The infectivity of C-terminal capsid-tagged FV vector particles was reduced up to 100-fold in comparison to wild type; however, infectivity was rescued by coexpression of wild type Gag and assembly of mixed particles. Specific dose-dependent binding of fluorescent FV particles to target cells was demonstrated in an Env-dependent manner, but not binding to target cell-extracted- or synthetic-lipids. Screening of target cells of various origins resulted in the identification of two cell lines, a human erythroid precursor- and a zebrafish- cell line, resistant to FV Env-mediated FV- and HIV-vector transduction. Conclusions: We have established functional, autofluorescent foamy viral particles as a valuable new tool to study FV host cell interactions using modern fluorescent imaging techniques. Furthermore, we succeeded for the first time in identifying two cell lines resistant to Prototype Foamy Virus Env-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, both cell lines still displayed FV Env-dependent attachment of fluorescent retroviral particles, implying a post-binding block potentially due to lack of putative FV entry cofactors. These cell lines might ultimately lead to the identification of the currently unknown ubiquitous cellular entry receptor(s) of FVs
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20478027
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