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  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY  (17)
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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; EXPOSURE ; MORTALITY ; occupation ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; MEN ; risk factors ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; VALIDITY ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; RELATIVE RISK ; exercise ; physical activity ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; UNIT ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; sports ; occupations ; ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE
    Abstract: Research conducted predominantly in male populations on physical activity and lung cancer has yielded inconsistent results. We examined this relationship among 416,277 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Detailed information on recent recreational, household and occupational physical activity, smoking habits and diet was assessed at baseline between 1992 and 2000. Relative risks (RR) were estimated using Cox regression. During 6.3 years of follow-up we identified 607 men and 476 women with incident lung cancer. We did not observe an inverse association between recent occupational, recreational or household physical activity and lung cancer risk in either males or females. However, we found some reduction in lung cancer risk associated with sports in males (adjusted RR = 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.98; highest tertile vs. inactive group), cycling (RR = 0.73; 0.54-0.99) in females and non-occupational vigorous physical activity. For occupational physical activity, lung cancer risk was increased for unemployed men (adjusted RR = 1.57; 1.20-2.05) and men with standing occupations (RR = 1.35; 1.02-1.79) compared with sitting professions. There was no evidence of heterogeneity of physical activity associations across countries, or across any of the considered cofactors. For some histologic subtypes suggestive sex-specific reductions, limited by subgroup sizes, were observed, especially with vigorous physical activity. In total, our study shows no consistent protective associations of physical activity with lung cancer risk. It can be assumed that the elevated risks found for occupational physical activity are not produced mechanistically by physical activity itself but rather reflect exposure to occupation-related lung cancer risk factors. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16894558
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; DEATH ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; RECRUITMENT ; PREDICTION ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION ; MEDICINE ; NOV ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; PREDICTING MORTALITY ; ROC CURVE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. METHODS We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We used a Cox regression analysis, with age as the time variable, and stratified the models according to study center and age at recruitment, with further adjustment for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and height. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 14,723 participants died. The lowest risks of death related to BMI were observed at a BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women. After adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly associated with the risk of death. Relative risks among men and women in the highest quintile of waist circumference were 2.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 2.33) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.56 to 2.04), respectively, and in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio, the relative risks were 1.68 (95% CI, 1.53 to 1.84) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.66), respectively. BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P〈0.001). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist-tohip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19005195
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; RISK ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; NETHERLANDS ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; physical activity ; ONCOLOGY ; POPULATION-BASED COHORT ; SCALE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; METAANALYSIS ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; CANCERS ; VARIABLES ; Helicobacter pylori ; stomach cancer ; BODY-MASS ; tumours ; gastric adenocarcinoma ; Type ; EURGAST ; REGISTER ; Oesophagus cancer
    Abstract: To analyse the association between types of physical activity (occupational, recreational and household, vigorous and overall) and risk of primary oesophageal (OAC) or gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC). From nine European countries, 420,449 participants were recruited between 1991 and 2000 and followed-up for a mean of 8.8 years to register incident GAC and OAC. Information on physical activity (PA), diet, lifestyle and health-related variables was obtained at baseline. Helicobacter pylori infection status was considered in a subset of 1,211 participants. Analyses were repeated by tumour site (cardia/non-cardia) and histological type (intestinal/diffuse). During the follow-up, 410 GAC and 80 OAC occurred. A lower risk of overall and non-cardia GAC was found for increasing levels of a PA index which combined occupational PA with weekly time spent in sports and cycling. The hazard ratio (HR) of GAC was 0.69, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94, for the comparison between active and inactive participants according to the PA index (HR = 0.44, 95% CI:0.26-0.74, for non-cardia GAC). No effect was found for cardia tumours or histological subtypes of GAC. PA of any kind was not associated with OAC. Overall and distal (non-cardia) gastric tumours were inversely associated with time spent on cycling and sports and a total PA index. No association was found for any type of PA and risk of cardia cancers of the stomach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20052611
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; LUNG ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; EPIC ; nutrition ; molecular epidemiology ; physical activity ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; biomarker ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; NEVER SMOKERS ; BLOOD GLUTATHIONE CONCENTRATIONS ; BULKY DNA-ADDUCTS ; EX-SMOKERS ; FORMER SMOKERS ; LIFE HABITS ; SMOKING-RELATED DISEASE
    Abstract: The association between physical activity, potential intermediate biomarkers and lung cancer risk was investigated in a study of 230 cases and 648 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition. Data on white blood cell aromatic-DNA adducts by 〈SU32〈/SUP-post-labelling and glutathione (GSH) in red blood cells were available from a subset of cases and controls. Compared with the first quartile, the fourth quartile of recreational physical activity was associated with a lower lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR) 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-0.90), higher GSH levels (+1.87 mu mol GSH g〈SU-1〈/SU haemoglobin, p = 0.04) but not with the presence of high levels of adducts (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.38-2.86). Despite being associated with recreational physical activity, in these small-scale pilot analyses GSH levels were not associated with lung cancer risk (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.84-1.07 per unit increase in GSH levels). Household and occupational activity was not associated with lung cancer risk or biomarker levels.〈/
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20050820
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; INTERVENTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; FAT ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; physical activity ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; dietary patterns ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; Lead ; Follow up ; weight gain ; OBESE ADULTS ; PLASMA LEPTIN ; PROTEIN DIET
    Abstract: Background: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results. Objective: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Design: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders. Results: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximate to 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management. Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 92: 398-407
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20592131
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  • 6
    Keywords: DOSE-RESPONSE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; SEX-HORMONES ; SELF-REPORTED SMOKING ; TREND ANALYSIS ; OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; EXOGENOUS HORMONE USE
    Abstract: Anthropometric measures have been related to risk of several cancers. For bladder cancer, however, evidence is sparse. Comparability of existing studies is hampered by use of different obesity-measures, inadequate control for smoking, and few female cases. This study examined associations between height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, waist-height ratio, body mass index (BMI), recalled weight at age 20 and bladder cancer, and investigated effect modification by age, tumor aggressiveness and smoking. The study was conducted in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, in 390,878 participants. Associations were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. During follow-up, 1,391 bladder cancers (1,018 male; 373 female) occurred. Height was unrelated to bladder cancer in both genders. We found a small but significant positive association with weight [1.04 (1.01-1.07) per 5 kilo], BMI [1.05 (1.02-1.08) per 2 units], waist circumference [1.04 (1.01-1.08) per 5 cm], waist-hip ratio (1.07 (1.02-1.13) per 0.05 unit] and waist-height ratio [1.07 (1.01-1.13) per 0.05 unit] in men. Stratification by smoking status confined associations in men to former smokers. In never smokers, we found no significant associations, suggesting residual confounding by smoking. Results did not differ with tumor aggressiveness and age. Residual analyses on BMI/waist circumference showed a significantly higher disease risk with BMI in men (p = 0.01), but no association with waist circumference. In conclusion, in this large study, height was unrelated to bladder cancer, whereas overweight was associated with a slightly higher bladder cancer risk in men. This association may, however, be distorted by residual confounding by smoking.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24771290
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; OBESITY ; body mass index ; nutrition ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; weight gain ; 10 EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; eating at restaurants ; eating at work ; EPIC-PANACEA ; FAST-FOOD CONSUMPTION ; OUT-OF-HOME ; RESTAURANT USE
    Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain with eating at restaurants and similar establishments or eating at work among 10 European countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Subjects: This study included a representative sample of 24 310 randomly selected EPIC participants. Methods: Single 24-h dietary recalls with information on the place of consumption were collected using standardized procedures between 1995 and 2000. Eating at restaurants was defined to include all eating and drinking occasions at restaurants, cafeterias, bars and fast food outlets. Eating at work included all eating and drinking occasions at the workplace. Associations between eating at restaurants or eating at work and BMI or annual weight changes were assessed using sex-specific linear mixed-effects models, controlling for potential confounders. Results: In southern Europe energy intake at restaurants was higher than intake at work, whereas in northern Europe eating at work appeared to contribute more to the mean daily intake than eating at restaurants. Cross-sectionally, eating at restaurants was found to be positively associated with BMI only among men (beta = +0.24, P = 0.003). Essentially no association was found between BMI and eating at work among both genders. In a prospective analysis among men, eating at restaurants was found to be positively, albeit nonsignificantly, associated with weight gain (beta = +0.05, P = 0.368). No association was detected between energy intake at restaurants and weight changes, controlling for total energy intake. Conclusion: Among men, eating at restaurants and similar establishments was associated with higher BMI and possibly weight gain.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20661252
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  • 8
    Keywords: smoking ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BMI ; RISK-FACTOR ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; androgens ; TO-HIP RATIO ; Waist-to-hip ratio ; FRENCH MEN ; multi-centric cohort study
    Abstract: Background/Objectives: The relation between lifetime use of alcohol and measures of abdominal and general adiposity is unknown. Subjects/Methods: Among 99 381 men and 158 796 women of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, means of waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR) and body mass index (BMI), and odds ratios (OR) for a larger WC than predicted for a given BMI (WClp = positive residuals of gender specific linear regression of BMI on WC) across categories of average lifetime use of alcohol (total, from wine and from beer) were calculated, all adjusted for socio-demographic, lifestyle and health factors. Results: WC, WHR and BMI in men using lifetime 〈= 6 g/d alcohol were 95.1 cm, 0.942 and 27.3 kg/m(2), and 96.2 cm, 0.961 and 28.3 kg/m(2) when using 496 g/d. WC and WHR in women was 83.2 cm and 0.813 for 〈= 6 g/d, and 84.6 cm and 0.830 for 460 g/d, whereas BMI deviated only slightly with the lowest BMI (26.7 kg/m(2)) observed for 46-24 g/d. Compared with 〈= 6 g/d, OR for a WClp in both genders increased steadily across categories of alcohol use (up to 1.40 (95% confidence interval 1.32, 1.49) in men using 〉60 g/d and 1.63 (1.54, 1.73) in women using 〉24 g/d), though increase was higher for alcohol from beer than from wine (P for difference between beer and wine 〈0.001 (men) and = 0.002 (women)). Conclusion: Lifetime alcohol use is positively related to abdominal and general adiposity in men, possibly following the male weight gain pattern; in women, it is positively related only to abdominal adiposity. In this context, beer may contribute additionally to abdominal adiposity. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21559044
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; INFORMATION ; cohort study ; POPULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; EPIC ; EUROPE ; Mediterranean diet ; fat distribution ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; OVERWEIGHT ; smoking cessation ; GENERAL-POPULATION ; weight gain ; LIFE EXPECTANCY ; SUN COHORT
    Abstract: Purpose. We assessed the association between smoking cessation and prospective weight change in the European population of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of smoking. Eating out of home And obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Methods. The study involved more than 300,000 healthy volunteers, recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 9 European countries, who provided data on anthropometry and smoking habits at baseline and after a follow-up of 5 years on average. Adjusted mixed-effects linear regression models were used to obtain sex-specific summary estimates of the association between the change in smoking status and the annual change in weight. Results. Smoking cessation tends to be followed by weight gain; when compared to stable smokers, annual weight gain was higher in men (0.44 kg (95%CI: 0.36; 0.52)) and women (0.46 kg (95%CI: 0.41; 0.52)) who stopped smoking during follow-up. When smokers who stopped smoking at least 1 year before recruitment were compared to never smokers, no major differences in annual weight gain were observed. The excess weight gain following smoking cessation appears to mainly occur in the first years following the cessation. Conclusions. When considering the benefits of smoking cessation, such findings strengthen the need for promoting cessation offering information on weight gain control and support to weight-concerned smokers in order to remove a barrier to quitting.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21939684
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; MASS INDEX ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; ABDOMINAL ADIPOSITY ; HEALTH BEHAVIORS ; MODIFIED MEDITERRANEAN DIET
    Abstract: Background: The evidence that individual dietary and lifestyle factors influence a person's weight and waist circumference is well established; however their combined impact is less well documented. Therefore, we investigated the combined effect of physical activity, nutrition and smoking status on prospective gain in body weight and waist circumference. Methods: We used data of the prospective EPIC-PANACEA study. Between 1992 and 2000, 325,537 participants (94,445 men and 231,092 women, aged between 25-70) were recruited from nine European countries. Participants were categorised into two groups (positive or negative health behaviours) for each of the following being physically active, adherent to a healthy (Mediterranean not including alcohol) diet, and never-smoking for a total score ranging from zero to three. Anthropometric measures were taken at baseline and were mainly self-reported after a medium follow-up time of 5 years. Results: Mixed-effects linear regression models adjusted for age, educational level, alcohol consumption, baseline body mass index and follow-up time showed that men and women who reported to be physically active, never-smoking and adherent to the Mediterranean diet gained over a 5-year period 537 (95% CI -706, -368) and 200 (-478, -87) gram less weight and 0.95 (-1.27, -0.639) and 0.99 (-1.29, -0.69) cm less waist circumference, respectively, compared to participants with zero healthy behaviours. Conclusion: The combination of positive health behaviours was associated with significantly lower weight and waist circumference gain.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23226361
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