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  • postmenopausal breast cancer
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  • 1
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Mainz//2011; 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds), 6. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Epidemiologie (DGEpi); 20110926-20110929; Mainz; DOC11gmds202 /20110920/
    Publication Date: 2011-09-20
    Keywords: phytoestrogens ; serum enterolactone ; postmenopausal breast cancer ; survival ; prognosis ; ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; INFORMATION ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; TUMORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; AGE ; POPULATIONS ; UNITED-STATES ; urinary estrogen metabolites ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; AGE 50 ; GENISTEIN CONTENT ; PHYTO-ESTROGENS ; RECEPTOR-POSITIVE TUMORS ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; SERUM ENTEROLACTONE CONCENTRATION ; WESTERN DISEASES
    Abstract: A diet high in isoflavonoids (soy) is associated with lower breast cancer risk in Asian populations. Due to the low soy intake, dietary lignans may be the more important phytoestrogen class in Western populations. We used a population-based case-control study of breast cancer by age 50 in southern Germany to evaluate the association between dietary intake of different phytoestrogens and premenopausal breast cancer risk. Dietary information was collected from 278 premenopausal cases and 666 age-matched controls, using a validated FFQ. Using multivariate logistic regression, the highest vs. lowest intake quartiles of daidzein and genistein yielded significantly reduced ORs (95% CI) for breast cancer risk of 0.62 (0.40-0.95) and 0.47 (0.29-0.74), respectively. The protective effects of daidzein and genistein were found only for hormone receptor-positive tumors. High intake of other isoflavonoids, e.g., formorionetin and biochanin A, as well as the sum of isoflavonoids were not associated with a decrease in risk. Breast cancer risk significantly decreased with a high intake of the plant lignan matairesinol (OR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.37-0.94) but not secoisolariciresinol or the sum of plant lignans. However, both estimated mammalian lignans, enterodiol and enterolactone, were inversely associated with breast cancer risk, with ORs (95% CI) of 0.61 (0.39-0.98) and 0.57 (0.35-0.92), respectively. No effect was found for total phytoestrogen intake. Our results suggest an important role of dietary intake of daidzein and genistein, despite low levels, as well as of matairesinol and mammalian lignans to reduce premenopausal breast cancer risk in this study population. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15069695
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  • 3
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FISH ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; alcohol consumption ; MEAT INTAKE ; DIETARY CARCINOGENS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; N-NITROSATION ; RED MEAT
    Abstract: Background. Current evidence suggests that high red meat intake is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. High fish intake may be associated with a decreased risk, but the existing evidence is less convincing. Methods: We prospectively followed 478040 men and women from 10 European countries who were free of cancer at enrollment between 1992 and 1998. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 1329 incident colorectal cancers were documented. We examined the relationship between intakes of red and processed meat, poultry, and fish and colorectal cancer risk using a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical activity, smoking status, dietary fiber and folate, and alcohol consumption, stratified by center. A calibration substudy based on 36994 subjects was used to correct hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diet measurement errors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with intake of red and processed meat (highest [〉 160 g/day] versus lowest [〈 20 g/day] intake, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.88; P-trend = .03) and inversely associated with intake of fish (〉 80 g/day versus 〈 10 g/day, HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.88; P-trend 〈 .001), but was not related to poultry intake. Correcting for measurement error strengthened the associations between colorectal cancer and red and processed meat intake (per 100-g increase HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.41, P-trend = .001 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.02, P-trend = .001 before and after calibration, respectively) and for fish (per 100 g increase HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.77, P-trend = .003; before and after correction, respectively). In this study population, the absolute risk of development of colorectal cancer within 10 years for a study subject aged 50 years was 1.71% for the highest category of red and processed meat intake and 1.28% for the lowest category of intake and was 1.86% for subjects in the lowest category of fish intake and 1.28% for subjects in the highest category of fish intake. Conclusions: Our data confirm that colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat and support an inverse association with fish intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15956652
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  • 4
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; VOLUME ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; DIETARY ; body mass index ; FOOD ; asthma ; EAST-GERMANY ; MASSES ; ADULT ; ADULTS ; RE ; SODIUM ; ECRHS ; HEALTH-SURVEY ; RESPONSIVENESS ; SALT ; european community respiratory health survey ; AIRWAY HYPERREACTIVITY ; bronchial hyperresponsiveness ; DIETARY-SODIUM ; HISTAMINE ; METHACHOLINE
    Abstract: Background: Several investigations suggested a relationship between sodium intake and asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), respectively. However, clinical and epidemiological studies did not show consistent finding. Objective: We analysed the association between dietary sodium intake and BHR to methacholine among 613 adults aged 20-65 years as one of the two German centres of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Methods: Dietary sodium intake was estimated from a 3-day weighed record of food intake. We applied multiple logistic regression models contrasting the three higher quartites of sodium intake versus the lowest to assess the risk of BHR and mild BHR estimated by PD20 and PD10, respectively, controlling for potential confounders and stratified for sex. In addition, we analysed PD20 (dose of methachotine causing a fall of 20% in forced expiratory volume in 1 s) as continuous variable expressed as transformed dose-response slope (tDRS) in the linear model. Results: Women were as expected more likely to be bronchial hyperresponsive (PD2.0: 26.1%; PD10: 52.2%) than men (PD20:15.8%; PD10: 34.8%) and had a lower mean daily sodium intake (2.36 g) compared with men (3.15 g). Logistic regression did not show any significant relationship between sodium intake and BHR in terms of PD20 after adjustment for age group, education, smoking status, body mass index and height in men or women. However, mild BHR assessed as PD10 was statistically significant positively related to the third (OR: 2.35; CI: 1.11-5.00) and highest quartite of sodium intake (OR: 2.28; CI: 1.06-4.88) in women, but not in men for third quartile (OR: 1.29; Cl: 0.68-2.44) and for fourth quartile (OR: 1.07; Cl: 0.56-2.07), respectively. Conclusion: Sodium intake by several food items does not alter BHR assessed as PD20 to methacholine but may increase mild BHR assessed as PD10. We conclude that, in addition, PD10 has to be considered when the effect of sodium intake on BHR is studied. (c) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15939248
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  • 5
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; POPULATION ; METABOLISM ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; ALPHA ; PLASMA ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; PREVALENCE ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; antioxidants ; NUTRIENTS ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; SERUM ; ADULTS ; HAY-FEVER ; REGRESSION ; RE ; allergic sensitisation ; CHILDHOOD ASTHMA ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; fruits and vegetables ; PARTICIPANTS ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; allergic rhinitis ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; odds ratio ; GAMMA-TOCOPHEROL ; ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS
    Abstract: Objectives: Antioxidant nutrients like carotenoids, tocopherols and vitamin C have been suggested to protect against allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitisation but scientific evidence is scarce. The aims of the study were to measure the plasma concentration of six carotenoids, alpha- and gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C as biomarkers of the intake, absorption and subsequent metabolism of these nutrients, and to assess their association with allergic rhinitis and sensitisation. Method: Data from a cross-sectional study on representative dietary and lifestyle habits of the population of Bavaria, Germany, were analysed. The plasma levels of six carotenoids (alpha-carotene, P-carotene, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and cryptoxanthin) as well as of alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C were measured in 547 adults aged between 19 and 81 years. Participants with specific serum immunoglobulin E 〉= 700 U l(-1) were categorised as sensitised. The association of plasma antioxidant levels, allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitisation was assessed by means of unconditional logistic regression models. Results: We observed a negative association between plasma total carotenoids and the prevalence of allergic rhinitis, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.13 (0.54-2.39) for the second, 0.72 (0-33-1-58) for the third and 0.44 (0.19-1.03) for the fourth quartile of total carotenoids concentration (P for trend = 0.0332); results for lycopene failed to reach statistical significance (P = 0.0608). Other single carotenoids, tocopherols and vitamin C were unrelated to allergic rhinitis. Allergic sensitisation was negatively associated with plasma gamma-tocopherol, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.92 (0.51-1.65) for the second, 1.00 (0-56-1.80) for the third and 0.45 (0.23-0.88) for the fourth quartile of plasma gamma-tocopherol concentration (P for trend = 0.0410). No other antioxidant was significantly related to allergic sensitisation. Conclusions: High plasma carotenoid concentrations reflecting a diet high in various fruits and vegetables might have a protective effect on allergic rhinitis in adulthood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870019
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; EXPOSURE ; MORTALITY ; occupation ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; MEN ; risk factors ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; VALIDITY ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; RELATIVE RISK ; exercise ; physical activity ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; SUBTYPES ; prospective ; UNIT ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; sports ; occupations ; ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE
    Abstract: Research conducted predominantly in male populations on physical activity and lung cancer has yielded inconsistent results. We examined this relationship among 416,277 men and women from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Detailed information on recent recreational, household and occupational physical activity, smoking habits and diet was assessed at baseline between 1992 and 2000. Relative risks (RR) were estimated using Cox regression. During 6.3 years of follow-up we identified 607 men and 476 women with incident lung cancer. We did not observe an inverse association between recent occupational, recreational or household physical activity and lung cancer risk in either males or females. However, we found some reduction in lung cancer risk associated with sports in males (adjusted RR = 0.71; 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.98; highest tertile vs. inactive group), cycling (RR = 0.73; 0.54-0.99) in females and non-occupational vigorous physical activity. For occupational physical activity, lung cancer risk was increased for unemployed men (adjusted RR = 1.57; 1.20-2.05) and men with standing occupations (RR = 1.35; 1.02-1.79) compared with sitting professions. There was no evidence of heterogeneity of physical activity associations across countries, or across any of the considered cofactors. For some histologic subtypes suggestive sex-specific reductions, limited by subgroup sizes, were observed, especially with vigorous physical activity. In total, our study shows no consistent protective associations of physical activity with lung cancer risk. It can be assumed that the elevated risks found for occupational physical activity are not produced mechanistically by physical activity itself but rather reflect exposure to occupation-related lung cancer risk factors. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16894558
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MARKER ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; GLUCOSE ; nutrition ; BETA-CELL FUNCTION ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; INCREASE ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; USA ; prospective ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; HEMOGLOBIN ; TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; CHRONIC OXIDATIVE STRESS ; GLUCOSE TOXICITY ; RECTAL CANCERS ; SERUM C-PEPTIDE
    Abstract: Although large-scale prospective cohort studies have related hyperglycemia to increased risk of cancer overall, studies specifically on colorectal cancer have been generally small. We investigated the association between prediagnostic levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker for average glucose level in blood, and colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One thousand and twenty-six incident colorectal cancer cases (561 men and 465 women) and 1,026 matched controls were eligible for the study. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORS) adjusted for possible confounders. Increasing HbA1c percentages were statistically significantly associated with a mild increase in colorectal cancer risk in the whole population [OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01,1.19 for a 10% increase in HbA1c]. In women, increasing HbA1c percentages were associated with a statistically significant increase in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.32 for a 10% increase in HbA1c) and with a borderline statistically significant increase in rectum cancer (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.99,1.50 for a 10% increase in HbA1c). No significant association with cancer risk was observed in men. The results of the current study suggest a mild implication of hyperglycemia in colorectal cancer, which seems more important in women than in men, and more for cancer of the rectum than of the colon. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3108-15)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990751
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  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; BLOOD ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; ADENOMAS ; HEALTH ; colorectal cancer ; REDUCED RISK ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; GENOTYPES ; COLON-CANCER ; POPULATIONS ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; CALCIUM ; nutrition ; RECTAL-CANCER ; SERUM ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; colon cancer ; VARIANT ; interaction ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; GENOTYPE ; USA ; prospective ; rectal cancer ; cancer research ; colorectal ; vitamin D ; VITAMIN-D ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; D METABOLITES ; vitamin D receptor ; 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN-D ; RECTAL CANCERS ; Genetic ; VITAMIN ; CONFIDENCE ; CRC ; Logistic regression ; D-RECEPTOR ; DIETARY CALCIUM
    Abstract: Increased levels of vitamin D and calcium may play a protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. It has been suggested that these effects may be mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the calcium sensing receptor (CASR). However, current epidemiologic evidence from European populations for a role of these genes in CRC risk is scarce. In addition, it is not clear whether these genes may modulate CRC risk independently or by interaction with blood vitamin D concentration wild-type bb, the BB genotype of the VDR BsmI polymorphism was associated with a reduced risk of CRC [RR, 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-0.98). The association was observed for colon cancer (RR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.45-0.95) but not rectal cancer (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.62-1.49). The Fok1 and CASR genotypes were not associated with CRC risk in thisand level of dietary calcium intake. A case-control study was conducted nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. CRC cases (1,248) were identified and matched to 1,248 control subjects. Genotyping for the VDR (BsmI: rs1544410; Fok1: rs2228570) and CASR (rs1801725) genes was done by Taqman, and serum vitamin D (25OHD) concentrations were measured. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio (RR). Compared with the study. No interactions were noted for any of the polymorphisms with serum 25OHD concentration or level of dietary calcium. These results confirm a role for the BsmI polymorphism of the VDR gene in CRC risk, independent of serum 25OHD concentration and dietary calcium intake. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(9):2485-91)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19706842
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISEASE ; POPULATION ; validation ; COMPLEX ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACID ; PLASMA ; MEN ; CENTERS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FOOD-INTAKE ; nutrient intake ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; prospective ; biological markers ; INVESTIGATE ; PROCESSED FOODS
    Abstract: Background: Plasma phospholipid fatty acids have been correlated with food intakes in populations with homogeneous dietary patterns. However, few data are available on populations with heterogeneous dietary patterns. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of dietary intakes across populations involved in a large European multicenter study. Design: A cross-sectional study design nested to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was conducted to determine plasma fatty acid profiles in 〉 3000 subjects from 16 centers, who had also completed 24-h dietary recalls and dietary questionnaires. Plasma fatty acids were assessed by capillary gas chromatography. Ecological and individual correlations were calculated between fatty acids and select food groups. Results: The most important determinant of plasma fatty acids was region, which suggests that the variations across regions are largely due to different food intakes. Strong ecological correlations were observed between fish intake and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = 0.78, P 〈 0.01), olive oil and oleic acid (r = 0.73, P 〈 0.01), and margarine and elaidic acid (r = 0.76, P 〈 0.01). Individual correlations varied across the regions, particularly between olive oil and oleic acid and between alcohol and the saturation index, as an indicator of stearoyl CoA desaturase activity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that specific plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of some food intakes in the EPIC Study. Moreover, these findings suggest complex interactions between alcohol intake and fatty acid metabolism, which warrants further attention in epidemiologic studies relating dietary fatty acids to alcohol-related cancers and other chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89: 331-46
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19056549
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; POPULATION ; CARCINOGENESIS ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; BLADDER-CANCER ; DIET ; PREVALENCE ; nutrition ; PROTEOMICS ; COLORECTAL ADENOMAS ; DIETARY-FAT ; physical activity ; ONCOLOGY ; colon cancer ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; biomarker ; fruits and vegetables ; pooled analysis ; prospective ; EPIC-EURGAST ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; VEGETABLE INTAKE
    Abstract: We consider some of the earlier work and some recent results on diet and cancer (since the 2007 WCRF/AICR report on Diet and Cancer), discuss challenges facing nutritional cancer epidemiology, and consider the field from the perspective of the need to apply what we know in cancer control. We highlight 2 current difficulties; first, we are uncertain on the stage of carcinogenesis on which many nutritional factors act, second, we often do not know what dose of a nutritional factor is needed to achieve its expected protective effect in humans. Part of the difficulty is the measurement error associated with food frequency questionnaires. Calibration studies (as in the European Prospective Investigation on diet and Cancer) have helped to reduce this, and pooled studies have helped to clarify associations. However, there is too little work on new biomarkers of nutrition; with the new techniques available (especially proteomics, and metabolomics) it should be possible to identify more and better biomarkers that could be used in repeated blood or urine samples and give very good information on diet. In cancer control we need to determine how to reduce the prevalence of obesity and increase physical activity in populations, not whether they are causal factors. This could be achieved by community-based interventions linked to some of the new cohort studies being initiated. We conclude we have reached the stage in nutritional cancer epidemiology where we need to concentrate more on applying the lessons we have learnt, than in seeking new aetiological associations
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19876918
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