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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; PLASMA ; PREVALENCE ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; ABSORPTION ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; SOUTHERN COMMUNITY COHORT ; CAROTENE CONCENTRATIONS
    Abstract: High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), the leading cause of gastric cancer, and low levels of micronutrients have been observed in many developing countries, and the question remains as to the whether an association between the 2 exists. The present study seeks to further our understanding of this potential connection in the Southern Community Cohort Study, representing a low-income population in the United States. Blood levels of antibodies to H. pylori proteins were assessed by multiplex serology for a sample of 310 African American and white participants, ages 40 to 79 years. Blood collected at baseline was also assayed for levels of carotenoids, tocopherols, retinol, and folate. Multivariate linear regression was used to calculate least-squares mean micronutrient levels within groups defined by H. pylori status. The mean serum levels of all micronutrients assayed were lower among H. pylori+ individuals than H. pylori- individuals, significantly for beta-carotene, folate, and retinol (decreases of 27.6%, 18.6%, and 9.7%, respectively). Individuals who were seropositive to the virulent CagA+ H. pylori strains had even lower mean levels of micronutrients, particularly beta-carotene, folate, total carotenoids, and retinol (decreases of 38.9%, 19.1%, 17.0%, and 11.7%, respectively, compared with H. pylori- individuals). However, dietary micronutrient levels as derived from a food frequency questionnaire did not vary between groups defined by H. pylori status. These results provide support for the hypothesis that H. pylori infection impairs nutrient absorption and suggest a need for future studies to explore the role of H. pylori infection on nutrition and gastric cancer risk in this high-risk population.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21436385
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  • 2
    Keywords: POPULATION ; RISK ; MELANOMA ; BRCA1 MUTATION CARRIERS ; CONSORTIUM ; TUMOR SUBTYPES
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of ER-negative disease to date, comprising 4754 ER-negative cases and 31 663 controls from three GWAS: NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) (2188 ER-negative cases; 25 519 controls of European ancestry), Triple Negative Breast Cancer Consortium (TNBCC) (1562 triple negative cases; 3399 controls of European ancestry) and African American Breast Cancer Consortium (AABC) (1004 ER-negative cases; 2745 controls). We performed in silico replication of 86 SNPs at P 1 10(-5) in an additional 11 209 breast cancer cases (946 with ER-negative disease) and 16 057 controls of Japanese, Latino and European ancestry. We identified two novel loci for breast cancer at 20q11 and 6q14. SNP rs2284378 at 20q11 was associated with ER-negative breast cancer (combined two-stage OR 1.16; P 1.1 10(8)) but showed a weaker association with overall breast cancer (OR 1.08, P 1.3 10(6)) based on 17 869 cases and 43 745 controls and no association with ER-positive disease (OR 1.01, P 0.67) based on 9965 cases and 22 902 controls. Similarly, rs17530068 at 6q14 was associated with breast cancer (OR 1.12; P 1.1 10(9)), and with both ER-positive (OR 1.09; P 1.5 10(5)) and ER-negative (OR 1.16, P 2.5 10(7)) disease. We also confirmed three known loci associated with ER-negative (19p13) and both ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancer (6q25 and 12p11). Our results highlight the value of large-scale collaborative studies to identify novel breast cancer risk loci.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22976474
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  • 3
    Keywords: carcinoma ; POPULATION ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; MARKER ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; PLATFORM
    Abstract: Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 x 10(-14), odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82-0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25378557
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  • 4
    Keywords: carcinoma ; MODELS ; POPULATION ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS ; PROFILES ; SET ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far reported 12 loci associated with serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. We hypothesized that some of these loci function through nearby transcription factor (TF) genes and that putative target genes of these TFs as identified by co-expression may also be enriched for additional EOC risk associations. METHODS: We selected TF genes within 1 Mb of the top signal at the 12 genome-wide significant risk loci. Mutual information, a form of correlation, was used to build networks of genes strongly co-expressed with each selected TF gene in the unified microarray data set of 489 serous EOC tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genes represented in this data set were subsequently ranked using a gene-level test based on results for germline SNPs from a serous EOC GWAS meta-analysis (2,196 cases/4,396 controls). RESULTS: Gene set enrichment analysis identified six networks centered on TF genes (HOXB2, HOXB5, HOXB6, HOXB7 at 17q21.32 and HOXD1, HOXD3 at 2q31) that were significantly enriched for genes from the risk-associated end of the ranked list (P〈0.05 and FDR〈0.05). These results were replicated (P〈0.05) using an independent association study (7,035 cases/21,693 controls). Genes underlying enrichment in the six networks were pooled into a combined network. CONCLUSION: We identified a HOX-centric network associated with serous EOC risk containing several genes with known or emerging roles in serous EOC development. IMPACT: Network analysis integrating large, context-specific data sets has the potential to offer mechanistic insights into cancer susceptibility and prioritize genes for experimental characterization.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26209509
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; GENOTYPES ; SMOKERS ; pancreatic cancer ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; ALLELES ; GENOTYPE ; LOCUS ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; GENETIC-BASIS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; BOSTON ; Type ; COHORTS ; STRATIFICATION ; GROUP ANTIGENS
    Abstract: A recent genome-wide association study (PanScan) identified significant associations at the ABO gene locus with risk of pancreatic cancer, but the influence of specific ABO genotypes remains unknown. We determined ABO genotypes (OO, AO, AA, AB, BO, and BB) in 1,534 cases and 1,583 controls from 12 prospective cohorts in PanScan, grouping participants by genotype-derived serologic blood type (O, A, AB, and B). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer by ABO alleles were calculated using logistic regression. Compared with blood type O, the ORs for pancreatic cancer in subjects with types A, AB, and B were 1.38 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.18-1.62], 1.47 (95% CI, 1.07-2.02), and 1.53 (95% CI, 1.21-1.92), respectively. The incidence rates for blood types O, A, AB, and B were 28.9, 39.9, 41.8, and 44.5 cases per 100,000 subjects per year. An increase in risk was noted with the addition of each non-O allele. Compared with OO genotype, subjects with AO and AA genotype had ORs of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.13-1.58) and 1.61 (95% CI, 1.22-2.18), whereas subjects with BO and BB genotypes had ORs of 1.45 (95% CI, 1.14-1.85) and 2.42 (1.28-4.57). The population attributable fraction for non-O blood type was 19.5%. In a joint model with smoking, current smokers with non-O blood type had an adjusted OR of 2.68 (95% CI, 2.03-3.54) compared with nonsmokers of blood type O. We concluded that ABO genotypes were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Cancer Res; 70(3); 1015-23. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20103627
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  • 6
    Keywords: POPULATION ; INFECTION ; BIOMARKERS ; HEALTH ; NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; METAANALYSIS ; INTERLEUKIN-8 ; serology ; CHINESE MEN
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to play a significant role in the aetiology of cancer, including gastric cancer. In the present study, we sought to examine pre-diagnostic systemic cytokine levels in plasma, which can be seen as markers of aggregate inflammation, and risk of distal gastric cancer in a case-control study nested within the prospective Shanghai Men's Health Study. METHODS: Circulating levels of eight inflammation-related cytokines were measured in the plasma collected at baseline for 180 incident cases of distal gastric cancer and 358 matched controls. Helicobacter pylori sero-positivity was assessed using multiplex serology. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Individuals with IL-8 levels above the lowest quartile were at twofold increased odds of gastric cancer [OR 1.91 (95 % CI 1.05-3.46), OR 2.10 (95 % CI 1.19-3.74), and OR 2.30 (95 % CI 1.26-4.19), for the second through fourth quartiles, respectively]. While there were suggestions of an increase in risk with increased level of many of the other cytokines measured (IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma), no significant associations were found at the p 〈 0.05 level. Infection with CagA-positive H. pylori did not modify these associations. CONCLUSIONS: In a population with high gastric cancer incidence and high H. pylori prevalence, increased circulating levels of IL-8 may indicate increased risk of gastric cancer. These findings add to our understanding of the disease and further efforts to uncover biomarkers of disease risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24052422
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  • 7
    Keywords: DISEASE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; POLYMORPHISMS ; IDENTIFICATION ; METAANALYSIS ; telomere length ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; 5P15.33
    Abstract: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 x 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 x 10(-5)), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 x 10(-5)) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 x 10(-5)). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants. What's new? Most pancreatic cancer patients do not survive long after diagnosis, and, so far, there are not many genetic markers to help screen for the disease. In search of genetic predictors of pancreatic cancer, the authors zoomed in on a region linked to susceptibility to the disease. They measured the frequency of different variants of two genes, telomerase reverse transcriptase and telomerase RNA component, among thousands of pancreatic cancer patients and controls. They identified several variants of the TERT gene that indicate a boosted pancreatic cancer risk, and which may develop into useful prognostic tools.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25940397
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; INFECTION ; antibody ; adenocarcinoma ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; multiplex serology ; ESOPHAGEAL ; ATROPHIC GASTRITIS ; VIRULENCE FACTORS ; PEPTIC-ULCER ; SOUTHERN COMMUNITY COHORT
    Abstract: Background: Gastric cancer incidence in African Americans is twice that of whites, and differing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori strain-specific isolates may help explain the disparity. Methods: Serum levels of antibodies to each of 15 H. pylori proteins were assessed using multiplex serology for a sample of 689 African American and white participants from the Southern Community Cohort Study. African and European admixture was estimated using a panel of 276 ancestry genetic markers, with "low," "medium," and "high" categories of African ancestry defined as 〈 85%, 85% to 95%, and 〉= 95%. Results: The majority (79%) of our study population were sero-positive for H. pylori. African American race was associated with a two-to sixfold increased odds for sero-positivity to eight H. pylori proteins, including the cancer-associated virulence constituents CagA [odds ratio (OR), 6.4; 95% CI, 4.5-9.1], and VacA (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.5-3.5). Compared to whites, African Americans of low, medium, and high African ancestry had 1.6-, 4.1-, and 5.2-fold increased odds of sero-positivity to H. pylori, primarily related to CagA sero-positive strains, for which increasing African ancestry led to 2.5-, 9.6-, and 13.1-fold increased odds. Among African Americans alone, compared to those of low African ancestry, African Americans of medium and high African ancestry had 2.5- and 3.4-fold increased odds of sero-positivity to H. pylori, and 3.5- and 4.9-fold increased odds of CagA sero-positive H. pylori strains. Conclusions: Host genetic variation and/or lifestyle factors associated with African ancestry contribute to the likelihood of infection with H. pylori, particularly its virulent strains, in this low-income U.S. southern population. Impact: Our findings that low-income African Americans of high African ancestry have a particularly high prevalence of antibodies against H. pylori provides a framework for further research into better detection and prevention of gastric cancer in this population.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21357376
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