Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN  (17)
Collection
Keywords
  • 1
    Keywords: OBESITY ; PATHOGENESIS ; nutrition ; ADIPOSE-TISSUE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; C-PEPTIDE ; Adiponectin
    Abstract: A "Western" lifestyle characterized by physical inactivity and excess weight is associated with a number of metabolic and hormonal dysregulations, including increased circulating estrogen levels, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and chronic inflammation. The same hormonal and metabolic axes might mediate the association between this lifestyle and the development of endometrial cancer. Using data collected within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study carried out in 10 European countries during 1992-2000, we conducted a factor analysis to delineate important components that summarize the variation explained by a set of biomarkers and to examine their association with endometrial cancer risk. Prediagnostic levels of testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, sex hormone-binding globulin, estrone, estradiol, C-peptide, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins 1 and 2, adiponectin, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, soluble TNF receptors 1 and 2, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist were measured in 233 incident endometrial cancer cases and 446 matched controls. Factor analysis identified 3 components associated with postmenopausal endometrial cancer risk that could be labeled "insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome," "steroids," and "inflammation" factors. A fourth component, "lipids," was not significantly associated with endometrial cancer. In conclusion, besides the well-known associations of risk with sex hormones and insulin-regulated physiological axes, our data further support the hypothesis that inflammation factors play a role in endometrial carcinogenesis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23492765
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: GROWTH ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ESTROGEN ; FEMALE NOBLE RATS ; STEROID-HORMONES ; androgens ; FREE TESTOSTERONE ; ORDET COHORT
    Abstract: Results from prospective studies on premenopausal serum hormone levels in relation to breast cancer risk have been inconclusive, especially with regard to tumor subtypes. Using a case-control study nested within the prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort (801 breast cancer cases and 1,132 matched control subjects), we analyzed the relationships of prediagnostic serum estradiol, free estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, free testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels with the risk of breast cancer by estrogen and progesterone receptor-positive and -negative breast tumors and by age at diagnoses. Higher prediagnostic serum levels of testosterone and free testosterone were associated with an increased overall risk of breast cancer [ORQ4-Q1=1.56 (95% CI 1.15-2.13), p(trend)=0.02 for testosterone and ORQ4-Q1=1.33 (95% CI 0.99-1.79), p(trend)=0.04 for free testosterone], but no significant risk association was observed for estradiol, free estradiol, progesterone and SHBG. Tests for heterogeneity between receptor-positive and -negative tumors were not significant. When analysis were stratified by age at tumor diagnosis, the odds ratios observed for estradiol were stronger and borderline significant for breast cancer diagnosed at age less than 50 [ORQ4-Q1=1.32 (95% CI 0.87-2.01), p(trend)=0.05] compared to breast cancer diagnosed at age 50 or above [ORQ4-Q1=0.94 (95% CI 0.60-1.47), p(trend)=0.34, p(het)=0.04]. In conclusion, our data indicate that higher premenopausal circulating testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer, but do not show a significant association of estradiol or progesterone with breast cancer risk, overall, by menstrual cycle phase or by tumor receptor status, although a possible risk increase with higher estradiol levels for tumors diagnosed before age 50 was seen.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24155248
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: COHORT ; RISK ; INTERVENTION ; HEALTH ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; MEN ; COLON-CANCER ; dietary fiber ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PRODUCTS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the association between whole-grain intake and colorectal cancer. Because whole-grain intake estimation might be prone to measurement errors, more objective measures (eg, biomarkers) could assist in investigating such associations. METHODS: The association between alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain rye and wheat intake, and colorectal cancer incidence were investigated using prediagnostic plasma samples from colorectal cancer case patients and matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We included 1372 incident colorectal cancer case patients and 1372 individual matched control subjects and calculated the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for overall and anatomical subsites of colorectal cancer using conditional logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. Regional differences (Scandinavia, the Mediterranean, Central Europe) were also explored. RESULTS: High plasma total alkylresorcinol concentration was associated with lower incidence of distal colon cancer; the adjusted incidence rate ratio of distal colon cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of plasma total alkylresorcinols was 0.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28 to 0.83). An inverse association between plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations and colon cancer was found for Scandinavian participants (IRR per doubling = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.98). However, plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations were not associated with overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, or rectal cancer. Plasma alkylresorcinols concentrations were associated with colon and distal colon cancer only in Central Europe and Scandinavia (ie, areas where alkylresorcinol levels were higher). CONCLUSIONS: High concentrations of plasma alkylresorcinols were associated with a lower incidence of distal colon cancer but not with overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, and rectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24317181
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: OBESITY ; FAT ; UNITED-STATES ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; exercise ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; SIZE ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; GAIN
    Abstract: Long-term weight gain (i.e., weight gain since age 20) has been related to higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but a lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer. The effect of weight change in middle adulthood is unclear. We investigated the association between weight change in middle adulthood (i.e., women aged 40-50 years) and the risk of breast cancer before and after the age of 50. We included female participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, with information on anthropometric measures at recruitment and after a median follow-up of 4.3 years. Annual weight change was categorized using quintiles taking quintile 2 and 3 as the reference category (-0.44 to 0.36 kg/year). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the association. 205,723 women were included and 4,663 incident breast cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 7.5 years (from second weight assessment onward). High weight gain (Q5: 0.83-4.98 kg/year) was related to a slightly, but significantly higher breast cancer risk (HRQ5_versus_Q2/3 : 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.18). The association was more pronounced for breast cancer diagnosed before or at age 50 (HRQ5_versus_Q2/3 : 1.37, 95% CI: 1.02-1.85). Weight loss was not associated with breast cancer risk. There was no evidence for heterogeneity by hormone receptor status. In conclusion, high weight gain in middle adulthood increases the risk of breast cancer. The association seems to be more pronounced for breast cancer diagnosed before or at age 50. Our results illustrate the importance of avoiding weight gain in middle adulthood.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24771551
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: DOSE-RESPONSE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; SEX-HORMONES ; SELF-REPORTED SMOKING ; TREND ANALYSIS ; OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; EXOGENOUS HORMONE USE
    Abstract: Anthropometric measures have been related to risk of several cancers. For bladder cancer, however, evidence is sparse. Comparability of existing studies is hampered by use of different obesity-measures, inadequate control for smoking, and few female cases. This study examined associations between height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, waist-height ratio, body mass index (BMI), recalled weight at age 20 and bladder cancer, and investigated effect modification by age, tumor aggressiveness and smoking. The study was conducted in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, in 390,878 participants. Associations were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. During follow-up, 1,391 bladder cancers (1,018 male; 373 female) occurred. Height was unrelated to bladder cancer in both genders. We found a small but significant positive association with weight [1.04 (1.01-1.07) per 5 kilo], BMI [1.05 (1.02-1.08) per 2 units], waist circumference [1.04 (1.01-1.08) per 5 cm], waist-hip ratio (1.07 (1.02-1.13) per 0.05 unit] and waist-height ratio [1.07 (1.01-1.13) per 0.05 unit] in men. Stratification by smoking status confined associations in men to former smokers. In never smokers, we found no significant associations, suggesting residual confounding by smoking. Results did not differ with tumor aggressiveness and age. Residual analyses on BMI/waist circumference showed a significantly higher disease risk with BMI in men (p = 0.01), but no association with waist circumference. In conclusion, in this large study, height was unrelated to bladder cancer, whereas overweight was associated with a slightly higher bladder cancer risk in men. This association may, however, be distorted by residual confounding by smoking.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24771290
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: RISK ; HEALTH ; CONSUMPTION ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; DRINKING ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; HORMONE-RECEPTOR STATUS ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTORS
    Abstract: Alcohol intake has been associated to breast cancer in pre and postmenopausal women; however results are inconclusive regarding tumor hormonal receptor status, and potential modifying factors like age at start drinking. Therefore, we investigated the relation between alcohol intake and the risk of breast cancer using prospective observational data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Up to 334,850 women, aged 35-70 years at baseline, were recruited in ten European countries and followed up an average of 11 years. Alcohol intake at baseline and average lifetime alcohol intake were calculated from country-specific dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. The study outcomes were the Hazard ratios (HR) of developing breast cancer according to hormonal receptor status. During 3,670,439 person-years, 11,576 incident breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Alcohol intake was significantly related to breast cancer risk, for each 10 g/day increase in alcohol intake the HR increased by 4.2% (95% CI: 2.7-5.8%). Taking 0 to 5 g/day as reference, alcohol intake of 〉5 to 15 g/day was related to a 5.9% increase in breast cancer risk (95% CI: 1-11%). Significant increasing trends were observed between alcohol intake and ER+/PR+, ER-/PR-, HER2- and ER-/PR-HER2- tumors. Breast cancer risk was stronger among women who started drinking prior to first full-time pregnancy. Overall, our results confirm the association between alcohol intake and both hormone receptor positive and hormone receptor negative breast tumors, suggesting that timing of exposure to alcohol drinking may affect the risk. Therefore, women should be advised to control their alcohol consumption.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25677034
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; RISK ; OBESITY ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; inflammation ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; FACTOR-ALPHA ; INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; SERUM-LEVELS ; HORMONES ; prospective ; soluble TNF receptors ; tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha
    Abstract: Chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to play a role in endometrial cancer development. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), one of the major pro-inflammatory cytokines, has also been implicated in endometrial physiology. We conducted a case-control study nested within the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) to examine the association of TNF-alpha and its two soluble receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) with endometrial cancer risk. Two-hundred-seventy cases and 518 matched controls were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. We observed an increased risk of endometrial cancer among women in the highest versus lowest quartile of TNF-alpha (odds ratio [OR]: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.09-2.73, P(trend) = 0.01), sTNFR1 (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 0.99-2.86, P(trend) = 0.07) and sTNFR2 (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.92-2.55, P(trend) = 0.03) after adjustment for body-mass-index, parity, age at menopause and previous postmenopausal hormone therapy use. Further adjustments for estrogens and C-peptide had minor effect on risk estimates. Our data show that elevated prediagnostic concentrations of TNF-alpha and its soluble receptors are related to a higher risk of endometrial cancer, particularly strong in women diagnosed within 2 years of blood donation. This is the first study of its kind and therefore deserves replication in further prospective studies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21154749
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: RISK ; AGE ; WOMEN ; POLYPHENOLS ; GREECE ; CALIBRATION ; HEART-DISEASE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ADULTS ; ESOPHAGEAL CANCER ; intake ; nonsmokers ; Anthocyanidins ; DIETARY FLAVONOID INTAKE ; EPIC-Europe ; Food sources ; LONG-ISLAND
    Abstract: Anthocyanidins are bioactive flavonoids with potential health-promoting effects. These may vary among single anthocyanidins considering differences in their bioavailability and some of the mechanisms involved. The aim of the present study was to estimate the dietary intake of anthocyanidins, their food sources and the lifestyle factors (sex, age, BMI, smoking status, educational level and physisical activity) involved among twenty-seven centres in ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Anthocyanidin intake and their food sources for 36 037 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in twenty-seven redefined centres were obtained using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). An ad hoc food composition database on anthocyanidins (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, petunidin) was compiled using data from the US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases and was expanded by adding recipes, estimated values and cooking factors. For men, the total anthocyanidin mean intake ranged from 19.83 (SE 1.53) mg/d (Bilthoven, The Netherlands) to 64.88 (SE 1.86) mg/d (Turin, Italy), whereas for women the range was 18.73 (SE 2.80) mg/d (Granada, Spain) to 44.08 (SE 2.45) mg/d (Turin, Italy). A clear south to north gradient intake was observed. Cyanidins and malvidins were the main anthocynidin contributors depending on the region and sex. Anthocyanidin intake was higher in non-obese older females, non-smokers, and increased with educational level and physical activity. The major food sources were fruits, wine, non-alcoholic beverages and some vegetables. The present study shows differences in both total and individual anthocyanidin intakes and various lifestyle factors throughout Europe, with some geographical variability in their food sources
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21481290
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; prevention ; CALCIUM ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; NURSES HEALTH ; D-BINDING PROTEIN ; FRENCH E3N COHORT ; CIRCULATING VITAMIN-D
    Abstract: Experimental evidence suggests that vitamin D might play a role in the development of breast cancer. Although the results of case-control studies indicate that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is inversely associated with the risk of breast cancer, the results of prospective studies are inconsistent. A case-control study embedded in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was carried out comprising 1,391 incident breast cancer cases and 1,391 controls. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models did not reveal a significant overall association between season-standardized 25(OH)D levels and the risk of breast cancer (ORQ4-Q1 [95% CI]: 1.07 [0.85-1.36], p(trend) = 0.67). Moreover, 25(OH)D levels were not related to the risks of estrogen receptor positive tumors (ORQ4-Q1 [95% CI]: 0.97 [0.67-1.38], p(trend) = 0.90) and estrogen receptor negative tumors (ORQ4-Q1 [95% CI]: 0.97 [0.66-1.42], p(trend) = 0.98). In hormone replacement therapy (HRT) users, 25(OH)D was significantly inversely associated with incident breast cancer (ORlog2 [95% CI]: 0.62 [0.42-0.90], p = 0.01), whereas no significant association was found in HRT nonusers (ORlog2 [95% CI]: 1.14 [0.80-1.62], p = 0.48). Further, a nonsignificant inverse association was found in women with body mass indices (BMI) 〈 25 kg/m(2) (ORlog2 [95% CI]: 0.83 [0.67-1.03], p = 0.09), as opposed to a borderline significant positive association in women with BMI 25 kg/m(2) (ORlog2 [95% CI]: 1.30 [1.0-1.69], p = 0.05). Overall, prediagnostic levels of circulating 25(OH)D were not related to the risk of breast cancer in the EPIC study. This result is in line with findings in the majority of prospective studies and does not support a role of vitamin D in the development of breast cancer. What's new? Experimental studies have indicated that vitamin D may play a role in preventing tumor formation in the breast. However, in the present investigation, the largest prospective case-control study on circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and breast cancer risk conducted to date, pre-diagnostic levels of 25(OH)D were found to be unrelated to overall breast cancer risk. While the results support those of similar prospective studies, a significant inverse association was detected between 25(OH)D levels and incident breast cancer in women taking hormone replacement therapy, suggesting that background factors may influence risk associations.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23526380
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: EXPOSURE ; ASSOCIATION ; CARCINOGENS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; REANALYSIS ; METAANALYSIS ; ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO-SMOKE ; NEVER SMOKERS ; 1ST CHILDBIRTH ; CALIFORNIA TEACHERS
    Abstract: Recent cohort studies suggest that increased breast cancer risks were associated with longer smoking duration, higher pack-years and a dose-response relationship with increasing pack-years of smoking between menarche and first full-term pregnancy (FFTP). Studies with comprehensive quantitative life-time measures of passive smoking suggest an association between passive smoking dose and breast cancer risk. We conducted a study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition to examine the association between passive and active smoking and risk of invasive breast cancer and possible effect modification by known breast cancer risk factors. Among the 322,988 women eligible for the study, 9,822 developed breast cancer (183,608 women with passive smoking information including 6,264 cases). When compared to women who never smoked and were not being exposed to passive smoking at home or work at the time of study registration, current, former and currently exposed passive smokers were at increased risk of breast cancer (hazard ratios (HR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] 1.16 [1.05-1.28], 1.14 [1.04-1.25] and 1.10 [1.01-1.20], respectively). Analyses exploring associations in different periods of life showed the most important increase in risk with pack-years from menarche to FFTP (1.73 [1.29-2.32] for every increase of 20 pack-years) while pack-years smoked after menopause were associated with a significant decrease in breast cancer risk (HR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34-0.82 for every increase of 20 pack-years). Our results provide an important replication, in the largest cohort to date, that smoking (passively or actively) increases breast cancer risk and that smoking between menarche and FFTP is particularly deleterious.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24590452
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...