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  • RADIATION-THERAPY  (11)
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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; THERAPY ; FOLLOW-UP ; imaging ; incidence ; radiation ; PATIENT ; kidney ; treatment ; MALIGNANCIES ; EXPERIENCE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; RATES ; RECURRENCE ; RESECTION ; CHILDREN ; FAILURE ; SARCOMA ; ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; neuroblastoma ; MALIGNANCY ; ONCOLOGY ; CHILDHOOD ; GRADE ; SOLID TUMORS ; STENOSIS ; methods ; NUCLEAR ; LOSSES ; BONE ; CHILD ; pediatric ; SARCOMAS ; soft-tissue sarcoma ; external beam radiotherapy ; EXTREMITY SARCOMAS ; intraoperative radiotherapy ; ONCOLOGY GROUP ; pediatric cancer ; STAGE-C NEUROBLASTOMA
    Abstract: Purpose: Intrauperative electron-beam radiotherapy (IOERT) has been applied for local dose escalation in over 1,400 patients in Heidelberg since 1991. Among these were 30 children, in 18 of whom IOERT was employed in radiation treatment with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) on account of incomplete resection. We address the question whether IOERT is able to compensate for microscopic or macroscopic tumor residue if employed in the overall radiation regimen. Methods and Materials: The data of the aforementioned 18 children were analyzed with regard to local recurrence, overall survival, and complication rates. All children suffered from either sarcomas or neuroblastomas. In all children, IOERT was employed for local dose escalation after or before EBRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 60.5 months, 15 of the treated children are alive. One local failure has been observed. Six children show clinically significant late morbidity, including the loss of a treated limb (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 [RTOG 4]), a severe nerve lesion (RTOG 3), an orthopedic complication (RTOG 2), a ureteral stenosis (not clinically significant), and a kidney hypotrophy (not clinically significant). In I child a fracture due to radionecrosis (RTOG 4) was diagnosed; however, in the follow-up, local tumor relapse was diagnosed as another possible reason for the fracture. Conclusions: Regarding the low incidence of local failure, IOERT seems to be able to compensate incomplete tumor resection in childhood sarcoma and neuroblastoma patients. The incidence of late morbidity is low enough to justify the employment of IOERT as part of the radiation treatment regimen for pediatric patients. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16257132
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  • 2
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; TUMORS ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; chemotherapy ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY ; CISPLATIN ; IMRT ; reirradiation ; NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA ; ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; head and neck cancer ; XEROSTOMIA ; Recurrent head and neck cancer ; late toxicity ; UNRESECTABLE HEAD
    Abstract: Background In this retrospective investigation we analyzed outcome and toxicity after intensity-modulated reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer. Results Median overall survival was 17 months, and the 1- and 2-year overall survival rates were 63% and 34%. The 1- and 2-year local control rates were 57% and 53%. Distant spread occurred in 34%, and reirradiation induced considerable late toxicity in 21% of the patients. Thirty-two percent showed increased xerostomia after reirradiation. The risk for xerostomia was significantly higher for cumulative mean doses of greater-than-or-equal 45 Gy to parotid glands. Considering median cumulative maximum doses of 53 Gy to the spinal cord and 63 Gy to the brainstem, no late toxicities were observed. Conclusions Reirradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy in recurrent head and neck cancer is feasible with acceptable toxicity and yields encouraging rates of local control and overall survival.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; RISK ; TISSUE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; METASTASIS ; CLINICAL-TRIALS ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; LOCALIZATION ; POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY ; ADULT PATIENTS ; EUROPEAN-ORGANIZATION ; ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY ; HIGH-GRADE ; NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY ; REGIONAL HYPERTHERMIA
    Abstract: Background: The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method: Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size 〉= 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m(2) iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m(2) iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m(2) day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result: Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion: The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and DFS comparable to previously published data on neo-/adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting. However, the definitive role of chemotherapy remains unclear in the absence of large, randomized trials. Therefore, the current regimen can only be recommended within a clinical study, and a possibly increased risk of secondary leukemias has to be taken into account
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22152120
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  • 4
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; DISEASE ; SURGERY ; PATIENT ; primary ; tumour ; LYMPH-NODES ; SKIN ; treatment ; STAGE ; PROGRESSION ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; RATES ; metastases ; FRANCE ; HEAD ; NECK ; TRABECULAR CARCINOMA ; SERIES ; Merkel cell carcinoma ; RECURRENT ; MANAGEMENT ; SINGLE ; CELL CARCINOMA ; overall survival ; LYMPH-NODE ; ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY ; RARE ; locoregional ; palliative
    Abstract: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare malignant tumour of the skin with a tendency to rapid local progression, frequent spread to regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. We report results with radiotherapy in the treatment of MCC. Thirty-nine patients with histologically proven MCC were treated. Fifteen patients had stage I disease (12 primary, 3 recurrent tumours). Twenty-one patients had stage 11 disease (10 primary, 11 recurrent tumours). Thirty patients were treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Six patients with inoperable disease received radiotherapy alone. Three patients in stage III with distant metastases were treated with palliative radiotherapy. For stage I patients, 3-year locoregional control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 90%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. For stage 11 patients, LC, DSS, and OS were 78%, 55%, and 29%, respectively. LC did not differ significantly between stage I and II patients. But, patients presented to radiotherapy directly after operation showed significantly improved LC compared to patients referred in recurrent situation (p = 0.039). Two of six inoperable patients treated with radiotherapy alone relapsed locally. In the current study, surgery and immediate adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in strong loco-regional control. Radiotherapy alone is suggested only in inoperable or metastatic MCC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17478386
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  • 5
    Keywords: CELLS ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; neoplasms ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; TUMORS ; SURGERY ; radiation ; MRI ; PROGRESSION ; CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY ; EXPERIENCE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; AGE ; EFFICACY ; REGION ; HEAD ; NECK ; local control ; ONCOLOGY ; overall survival ; radiation therapy ; MENINGIOMAS ; BONE ; SCAN ; INSTITUTION ; CASE SERIES
    Abstract: Background: Giant cell tumors are rare neoplasms, representing less than 5% of all bone tumors. The vast majority of giant cell tumors occurs in extremity sites and is treated by surgery alone. However, a small percentage occurs in pelvis, spine or skull bones, where complete resection is challenging. Radiation therapy seems to be an option in these patients, despite the lack of a generally accepted dose or fractionation concept. Here we present a series of five cases treated with high dose IMRT. Patients and Methods: From 2000 and 2006 a total of five patients with histologically proven benign giant cell tumors have been treated with IMRT in our institution. Two patients were male, three female, and median age was 30 years (range 20 - 60). The tumor was located in the sacral region in four and in the sphenoid sinus in one patient. All patients had measurable gross disease prior to radiotherapy with a median size of 9 cm. All patients were treated with IMRT to a median total dose of 64 Gy (range 57.6 Gy to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. Results: Median follow up was 46 months ranging from 30 to 107 months. Overall survival was 100%. One patient developed local disease progression three months after radiotherapy and needed extensive surgical salvage. The remaining four patients have been locally controlled, resulting in a local control rate of 80%. We found no substantial tumor shrinkage after radiotherapy but in two patients morphological signs of extensive tumor necrosis were present on MRI scans. Decline of pain and/or neurological symptoms were seen in all four locally controlled patients. The patient who needed surgical salvage showed markedly reduced pain but developed functional deficits of bladder, rectum and lower extremity due to surgery. No severe acute or late toxicities attributable to radiation therapy were observed so far. Conclusion: IMRT is a feasible option in giant cells tumors not amendable to complete surgical removal. In our case series local control was achieved in four out of five patients with marked symptom relief in the majority of cases. No severe toxicity was observed
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20187955
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  • 6
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; SURGERY ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; adenocarcinoma ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; chemoradiation ; 3D conformal radiotherapy ; NEOADJUVANT CHEMORADIOTHERAPY ; DOSE RADIATION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). RESULTS: Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to skin, lung and heart were rare. CONCLUSION: IMRT with concurrent systemic therapy in the definitive treatment of esophageal cancer using an integrated boost concept with doses up to 60 Gy is feasible and yields good results with acceptable acute and late overall toxicity and low side effects to skin, lung and heart.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25175056
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  • 7
    Keywords: carcinoma ; TOXICITY ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; chemotherapy ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY ; CISPLATIN ; IMRT ; reirradiation ; NASOPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA ; ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; PHASE-II ; cetuximab ; PLUS CETUXIMAB ; Recurrent head and neck cancer ; SALVAGE SURGERY
    Abstract: Purpose: In this retrospective investigation, the outcome and toxicity after reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy of recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) in patients who had contraindications to platinum-based chemotherapy were analyzed. Material and Methods: Ten patients with locally advanced recurrent HNC were retrospectively evaluated. In 9 cases, histology was squamous cell carcinoma, in one case adenoid cystic carcinoma. External beam radiotherapy was part of the initial treatment in all cases. Reirradiation was carried out using step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Cetuximab was applied as loading dose (400 mg/m(2)) 1 week prior to reirradiation and then weekly concurrently with radiotherapy (250 mg/m(2)). Results: The median overall survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 7 months; the 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was 40%. Local failure was found in 3 patients, resulting in a 1-year local control (LC) rate of 61%. The 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate was 44%, while the 1-year distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was 75%. Acute hematological toxicity was not observed in the group. Severe acute toxicity included one fatal infield arterial bleeding and one flap necrosis. Severe late toxicities were noted in 2 patients: fibrosis of the temporomandibular joint in 1 patient and stenosis of the cervical esophagus in another. Conclusions: IMRT reirradiation with concurrent cetuximab immunotherapy in recurrent HNC is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity. Further investigations are necessary to determine the clinical role of this therapy concept
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21234529
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  • 8
    Keywords: PATIENT ; radiation ; Germany ; THERAPY ; imaging ; CANCER ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; Jun ; pancreatic cancer ; RECURRENT ; ONCOLOGY ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; radiation therapy
    Type of Publication: Meeting abstract published
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  • 9
    Keywords: RESECTION ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; radiation ; THERAPY
    Type of Publication: Meeting abstract published
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  • 10
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; Germany ; THERAPY ; CLASSIFICATION ; FOLLOW-UP ; radiation ; TIME ; PATIENT ; SKIN ; T cell ; T-CELL ; STAGE ; LYMPHOMA ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; AGE ; EFFICIENT ; ELECTRON ; FRANCE ; BEAM ; CTCL ; non-hodgkin's lymphoma ; MANAGEMENT ; MYCOSIS-FUNGOIDES ; THERAPIES ; overall survival ; GRADE ; T-CELL LYMPHOMA ; cutaneous T-cell lymphoma ; radiation therapy ; REMISSION ; SYMPTOMS ; mycosis fungoides ; PROGRESSION-FREE SURVIVAL ; response ; non-Hodgkin ; CORRELATE ; COURSES ; EORTC ; total skin radiotherapy ; TSEBT
    Abstract: Our aim was to analyze the effectiveness of palliative total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) in the management of advanced cutaneous T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CTCL). Eighteen patients (median age 59 Years) with advanced and therapy-refractory CTCL in stages IIB-IV were treated with TSEBT for the first time. The most common histological subtype was Mycosis fungoides (72%). All patients suffered from lymphoma-associated symptoms. Median daily fractions of 1 Gy were administered up to a median total dose of 25 Gy. The median follow-up period. was 11 months. Nine patients (50%) achieved a complete response and seven patients (39%) had a limited response. The actuarial one-Year progression-free survival was 24%. Four patients (22%) had continuing remission over a median period of six months. Lymphoma associated symptoms were improved in 16 patients (89%). The median overall survival after receiving TSEBT was 12 months, resulting in an actuarial one-year overall survival of 48%. Treatment related acute effects (grade 1 or 2) were observed in all patients during radiation therapy. Transient grade 3 epitheliolyses developed in five patients (28%), late skin effects (grade 1 and 2) in 16 patients (89%), and hypohidrosis was seen in six patients (33%). We conclude that TSEBT is a very efficient and tolerable palliative treatment for patients with advanced CTCL
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18474461
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