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  • RECEPTOR  (4)
  • 1
    Keywords: brain ; RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; Germany ; NETWORKS ; SYSTEM ; TOOL ; DISTINCT ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; TRANSDUCTION ; COMPLEX ; MESSENGER-RNA ; RAT ; signal transduction ; MEMBRANE ; SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION ; mass spectrometry ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; CHROMATOGRAPHY ; PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS ; glutathione-S-transferase ; BINDING PROTEIN ; signaling ; molecular ; NEURONS ; analysis ; cilia ; ENGLAND ; XENOBIOTIC-METABOLIZING ENZYMES ; affinity chromatography ; calcium-calmodulin ; CHEMOSENSORY CILIA ; NUCLEOTIDE-GATED CHANNEL ; olfaction ; olfactory receptor neurons ; PHOSPHOLIPID-BINDING ; SENSORY NEURONS
    Abstract: The olfactory neuroepithelium represents a unique interface between the brain and the external environment. Olfactory function comprises a distinct set of molecular tasks: sensory signal transduction, cytoprotection and adult neurogenesis. A multitude of biochemical studies has revealed the central role of Ca2+ signaling in the function of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). We set out to establish Ca2+-dependent signaling networks in ORN cilia by proteomic analysis. We subjected a ciliary membrane preparation to Ca2+/calmodulin-affinity chromatography using mild detergent conditions in order to maintain functional protein complexes involved in olfactory Ca2+ signaling. Thus, calmodulin serves as a valuable tool to gain access to novel Ca2+-regulated protein complexes. Tandem mass spectrometry (nanoscale liquid-chromatography-electrospray injection) identified 123 distinct proteins. Ninety-seven proteins (79%) could be assigned to specific olfactory functions, including 32 to sensory signal transduction and 40 to cytoprotection. We point out novel perspectives for research on the Ca2+-signaling networks in the olfactory system of the rat. (C) 2007 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18155848
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; THERAPY ; GENE ; LINES ; RECOGNITION ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; GLIOMA ; GLIOMA-CELLS ; T-CELL-ACTIVATION ; TGF-BETA ; TUMOR-CELL ; cancer research ; GLIOBLASTOMA ; B7-H3 ; FURIN-LIKE PROTEASES
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Recent work points out a role of B7H3, a member of the B7-family of costimulatory proteins, in conveying immunosuppression and enforced invasiveness in a variety of tumor entities. Glioblastoma is armed with effective immunosuppressive properties resulting in an impaired recognition and ineffective attack of tumor cells by the immune system. In addition, extensive and diffuse invasion of tumor cells into the surrounding brain tissue limits the efficacy of local therapies. Here, 4IgB7H3 is assessed as diagnostic and therapeutic target for glioblastoma. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: To characterize B7H3 in glioblastoma, we conduct analyses not only in glioma cell lines and glioma-initiating cells but also in human glioma tissue specimens. RESULTS: B7H3 expression by tumor and endothelial cells correlates with the grade of malignancy in gliomas and with poor survival. Both soluble 4IgB7H3 in the supernatant of glioma cells and cell-bound 4IgB7H3 are functional and suppress natural killer cell-mediated tumor cell lysis. Gene silencing showed that membrane and soluble 4IgB7H3 convey a proinvasive phenotype in glioma cells and glioma-initiating cells in vitro. These proinvasive and immunosuppressive properties were confirmed in vivo by xenografted 4IgB7H3 gene silenced glioma-initiating cells, which invaded significantly less into the surrounding brain tissue in an orthotopic model and by subcutaneously injected LN-229 cells, which were more susceptible to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity than unsilenced control cells. CONCLUSIONS: Because of its immunosuppressive and proinvasive function, 4IgB7H3 may serve as a therapeutic target in the treatment of glioblastoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22080438
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  • 3
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; INFORMATION ; SUPPORT ; TOOL ; SITE ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; TRANSDUCTION ; MECHANISM ; primary ; RAT ; mechanisms ; signal transduction ; MEMBRANE ; SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION ; mass spectrometry ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; LOCALIZATION ; RECEPTORS ; FOOD ; protein expression ; PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS ; POLYACRYLAMIDE GELS ; NEURONS ; analysis ; TECHNOLOGY ; EPITHELIUM ; ENGLAND ; enzymatic ; XENOBIOTIC-METABOLIZING ENZYMES ; CHEMOSENSORY CILIA ; NUCLEOTIDE-GATED CHANNEL ; olfactory receptor neurons ; ODORANT RECEPTORS ; SENSITIVE ADENYLATE-CYCLASE ; sensory cilia
    Abstract: The cilia of mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) represent the sensory interface that is exposed to the air within the nasal cavity. The cilia are the site where odorants bind to specific receptors and initiate olfactory transduction that leads to excitation of the neuron. This process involves a multitude of ciliary proteins that mediate chemoelectrical transduction, amplification, and adaptation of the primary sensory signal. Many of these proteins were initially identified by their enzymatic activities using a membrane protein preparation from olfactory cilia. This so-called "calcium-shock" preparation is a versatile tool for the exploration of protein expression, enzyme kinetics, regulatory mechanisms, and ciliary development. To support such studies, we present a first proteomic analysis of this membrane preparation. We subjected the cilia preparation to liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation (LC-ESI-MS/MS) tandem mass spectrometry and identified 268 proteins, of which 49% are membrane proteins. A detailed analysis of their cellular and subcellular localization showed that the cilia preparation obtained by calcium shock not only is highly enriched in ORN proteins but also contains a significant amount of nonciliary material. Although our proteomic study does not identify the entire set of ciliary and nonciliary proteins, it provides the first estimate of the purity of the calcium-shock preparation and provides valuable biochemical information for further research
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18032372
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  • 4
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; Germany ; PATHWAY ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; COMPLEX ; RAT ; signal transduction ; SIGNAL ; MOUSE ; MEMBRANE ; SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION ; mass spectrometry ; PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS ; signaling ; NEURONS ; EPITHELIUM ; NUCLEOTIDE-GATED CHANNEL ; olfactory receptor neurons ; sensory cilia ; ADENYLYL-CYCLASE ; CHLORIDE ACCUMULATION ; MAMMALIAN ODORANT RECEPTORS ; ORGANELLAR PROTEOMICS
    Abstract: Olfactory sensory neurons expose to the inhaled air chemosensory cilia which bind odorants and operate as transduction organelles. Odorant receptors in the ciliary membrane activate a transduction cascade which uses cAMP and Ca2+ for sensory signaling in the ciliary lumen. Although the canonical transduction pathway is well established, molecular components for more complex aspects of sensory transduction, like adaptation, regulation, and termination of the receptor response have not been systematically identified. Moreover, open questions in olfactory physiology include how the cilia exchange solutes with the surrounding mucus, assemble their highly polarized set of proteins, and cope with noxious substances in the ambient air. A specific ciliary proteome would promote research efforts in all of these fields. We have improved a method to detach cilia from rat olfactory sensory neurons and have isolated a preparation specifically enriched in ciliary membrane proteins. Using LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis, we identified 377 proteins which constitute the olfactory cilia proteome. These proteins represent a comprehensive data set for olfactory research since more than 80% can be attributed to the characteristic functions of olfactory sensory neurons and their cilia: signal processing, protein targeting, neurogenesis, solute transport, and cytoprotection. Organellar proteomics thus yielded decisive information about the diverse physiological functions of a sensory organelle
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19086097
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