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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; carcinoma ; Germany ; LUNG ; PERFUSION ; THERAPY ; CT ; DENSITY ; LUNG-CANCER ; NEW-YORK ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; CONTRAST ; INJECTION ; treatment ; DIFFERENCE ; REGION ; REGIONS ; LOCALIZATION ; PARAMETERS ; tomography ; CARCINOMAS ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; PET ; lung neoplasms ; PULMONARY ; DYNAMIC CT ; X-ray computed
    Abstract: Advanced bronchial carcinomas by means of perfusion and peak enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced multislice CT are characterized. Twenty-four patients with advanced bronchial carcinoma were examined. During breathhold, after injection of a contrast-medium (CM), 25 scans were performed (I scan/s) at a fixed table position. Density-time curves were evaluated from regions of interest of the whole tumor and high- and low-enhancing tumor areas. Perfusion and peak enhancement were calculated using the maximum-slope method of Miles and compared with size, localization (central or peripheral) and histology. Perfusion of large tumors (〉50 cm(3)) averaged over both the whole tumor (P=0.001) and the highest enhancing area (P=0.003) was significantly lower than that of smaller ones. Independent of size, central carcinomas had a significantly (P=0.04) lower perfusion (mean 27.9 ml/min/100 g) than peripheral ones (mean 66.5 ml/min/100 9). In contrast, peak enhancement of central and peripheral carcinomas was not significantly different. Between non-small-cell lung cancers and small-cell lung cancers, no significant differences were observed in both parameters. In seven tumors, density increase after CM administration started earlier than in the aorta, indicating considerable blood supply from pulmonary vessels. Tumor perfusion was dependent on tumor size and localization, but not on histology. Furthermore, perfusion CT disclosed blood supply from both pulmonary and/or bronchial vessels in some tumors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15029450
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  • 2
    Keywords: measurement ; tumor ; Germany ; LUNG ; CT ; IMAGES ; DISEASE ; NEW-YORK ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; REDUCTION ; CONTRAST ; MRI ; CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; NO ; DIFFERENCE ; REGION ; LOCALIZATION ; LENGTH ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; CURVES ; 3-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION ; MOTION ; HEALTHY ; ORIENTATION ; LOCATION ; dynamic MRI ; ADULT ; ADULTS ; STRENGTH ; TRUEFISP ; HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS ; PULMONARY-FUNCTION ; HEART-FAILURE ; EXPIRATION ; LUNG-VOLUMES ; breathing cycle ; diaphragmatic function
    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess diaphragmatic length and shortening during the breathing cycle in healthy volunteers and patients with a lung tumor using dynamic MRI (dMRI). In 15 healthy volunteers and 28 patients with a solitary lung tumor, diaphragmatic motion and length were measured during the breathing cycle using a trueFISP sequence (three images per second in the coronal and sagittal plane). Time-distance curves and maximal length reduction (= shortening) of the diaphragm were calculated. The influence of tumor localization on diaphragmatic shortening was examined. In healthy volunteers maximal diaphragmatic shortening was 30% in the coronal and 34% in the sagittal orientation, with no difference between both hemithoraces. Tumors of the upper and middle lung region did not affect diaphragmatic shortening. In contrast, tumors of the lower lung region changed shortening significantly (P〈0.05). In hemithoraces with a tumor in the lower region, shortening was 18% in the coronal and 19% in the sagittal plane. The ratio of diaphragmatic length change from inspiration to expiration changed significantly from healthy subjects (inspiration length &MGT; expiratory length, P〈0.05) to patients with a tumor in the lower lung region (inspiratory length = expiratory length). dMRI is a simple, non-invasive method to evaluate diaphragmatic motion and shortening in volunteers and patients during the breathing cycle. Tumors of the lower lung region have a significant influence on shortening of the diaphragm
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15127220
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  • 3
    Keywords: measurement ; CANCER ; radiotherapy ; tumor ; Germany ; LUNG ; IMAGES ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; MRI ; CYCLE ; SEQUENCE ; STAGE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; MOBILITY ; REGION ; REGIONS ; WALL ; CURVES ; MOTION ; FUTURE ; LINEAR-ACCELERATOR ; LOCATION ; dynamic MRI ; TRUEFISP ; PULMONARY-FUNCTION ; EXTERNAL-BEAM RADIOTHERAPY ; breathing cycle ; CT SCANS ; DIAPHRAGM ; HEALTHY-SUBJECTS ; lung MRL radiotherapy ; tumor diameter
    Abstract: Background and purpose: To assess the influence of tumor diameter on tumor mobility and motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax during the whole breathing cycle in patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using dynamic MRI. Patients and methods: Breathing cycles of thirty-nine patients with solitary NSCLCs were examined using a trueFISP sequence (three images per second). Patients were divided into three groups according to the maximal tumor diameter in the transverse plane ( 〈3, 3-5 and 〉5 cm). Continuous time-distance curves and deep inspiratory and expiratory positions of the chest wall, the diaphragm and the tumor were measured in three planes. Motion of tumor-bearing and corresponding contralateral non-tumor bearing regions was compared. Results: Patients with a tumor 〉3 cm showed a significantly lower diaphragmatic motion of the tumor bearing compared with the non-tumor bearing hemithorax in the craniocaudal (CC) directions (tumors 3-5 cm: 23.4 +/- 1.2 vs 21.1 +/- 1.5 cm (P 〈0.05); tumors 〉5 cm: 23.4 +/- 1.2 vs 20.1 +/- 1.6 cm (P 〈0.01). Tumors 〉5 cm in the lower lung region showed a significantly lower mobility compared with tumors 〈3 cm (1.8 +/- 1.0 vs 3.8 +/- 0.7 cm, P 〈0.01) in the CC directions. Conclusions: Dynamic MRI is a simple non-invasive method to differentiate mobility of tumors with different diameters and its influence on the surrounding tissue. Tumor diameter has a significant influence on tumor mobility and this might be taken into account in future radiotherapy planning, (C) 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15588881
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  • 4
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL LUNG-CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG ; THERAPY ; IMAGES ; imaging ; SYSTEM ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; MRI ; CYCLE ; STAGE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; MOBILITY ; metastases ; REGION ; REGIONS ; VARIABILITY ; SAFETY ; MOTION ; TARGETS ; LINEAR-ACCELERATOR ; LUNG-CARCINOMA ; LOCATION ; dynamic MRI ; THERAPIES ; EXTERNAL-BEAM RADIOTHERAPY ; breathing cycle ; CT SCANS ; DIAPHRAGM ; lung motion
    Abstract: Purpose: To assess diaphragm, lung region, and tumor mobility during the whole breathing cycle using dynamic MRI. A generalized safety margin concept for radiotherapy planning was calculated and compared with an individualized concept. Methods and Materials: The breathing cycles of 20 patients with solitary lung tumors (15 Stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma, 5 small solitary metastases) were examined with dynamic MRI (true Fast imaging with steady precision, three images per second). The deep inspiratory and expiratory positions of the diaphragm, upper, middle, and lower lung regions, and the tumor were measured in three dimensions. The mobility of tumor-bearing and corresponding tumor-free regions was compared. Tumor mobility in quiet respiration served as an MRI-based safety margin concept. Results: The motion of the lung regions was significantly greater in the lower regions than in the upper regions (5 +/- 2 cut vs. 0.9 +/- 0.4 cm, p 〈 0.05). Tumor-bearing lung regions showed a significantly lower mobility than the corresponding noninvolved regions (p 〈 0.05). In quiet respiration, tumor mobility showed a high variability; a safety margin of 3.4 mm in the upper, 4.5 mm in the middle, and 7.2 mm in the lower region was calculated. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI is a simple, noninvasive method to evaluate intrathoracic tumor mobility for therapy planning. Because of the high variability of tumor mobility, an individual safety margin is recommended. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15234028
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; carcinoma ; Germany ; LUNG ; imaging ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; VOLUME ; TUMORS ; RESOLUTION ; PATIENT ; MRI ; SEQUENCE ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ; magnetic resonance imaging ; REGION ; LOCALIZATION ; LENGTH ; PARAMETERS ; FUNCTION TESTS ; 3-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION ; MOTION ; HEALTHY ; COMPLICATIONS ; dynamic MRI ; STAGE-I ; HEALTHY-VOLUNTEERS ; PULMONARY-FUNCTION ; HUMAN DIAPHRAGM SHAPE ; breathing cycle ; HEALTHY-SUBJECTS ; SPIROMETRY ; parallel imaging ; TEMPORAL RESOLUTION ; IA ; FEV1 /VC ; INTRATHORACIC TUMOR
    Abstract: Purpose: To assess relative forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1/vital capacity (VQ in healthy subjects and patients with a lung tumor using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) parameters. Materials and Methods: In 15 healthy volunteers and 31 patients with a non-small-cell lung carcinoma stage I (NSCLC 1), diaphragmatic length change (LEI) and craniocaudal (CC) intrathoracic distance change within one second; from maximal inspiration (DEI) were divided by total length change (LEtotal, DEtotal) as a surrogate of spirometric FEV 1 /VC using a true fast imaging with steady-state precession (trueFISP) sequence TE/TR = 1.7/37.3 msec, temporal resolution = 3 images/second). Influence of tumor localization was examined. Results: In healthy volunteers FEV I /VC showed a highly significant correlation with LE1/LEtotal and DE1/DEtotal (r 〉 0.9. P 〈 0.01). In stage IB tumor patients, comparing tumor-bearing with the non-tumor-bearing hemithorax, there,was a significant difference in tumors of the middle (LE1 /LEtotal= 0.63 +/- 0.05 vs. 0. 73 +/- 0.04, DE1/DEtotal= 0.66 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.04; P 〈 0.05) and lower (P 〈 0.05) lung region. Stage IA tumor patients showed no significant differences with regard to healthy subjects. Conclusion: dMRI is a simple noninvasive method to locally determine LE1 /LEtotal and DE1 /DEtotal as a surrogate of FEV1/VC in volunteers and patients. Tumors of the middle and lower lung regions have a significant influence on these MRI parameters
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15723381
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