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  • RISK  (12)
  • VARIANTS  (6)
  • 1
    Keywords: RISK ; MEN ; GLIOMA ; JAPANESE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; COMMON VARIANTS ; MYOSIN VI ; 22Q13
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of 〉10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P 〈 5 x 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25217961
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; THERAPY ; RISK ; BREAST ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: Background The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway has been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) initiation, but its role in progression remains unknown. Methods Among 5887 PCa patients (704 PCa deaths) of European ancestry from seven cohorts in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, we conducted Cox kernel machine pathway analysis to evaluate whether 530 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 IGF pathway-related genes were collectively associated with PCa mortality. We also conducted SNP-specific analysis using stratified Cox models adjusting for multiple testing. In 2424 patients (313 PCa deaths), we evaluated the association of prediagnostic circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels and PCa mortality. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The IGF signaling pathway was associated with PCa mortality (P = .03), and IGF2-AS and SSTR2 were the main contributors (both P = .04). In SNP-specific analysis, 36 SNPs were associated with PCa mortality with P-trend less than .05, but only three SNPs in the IGF2-AS remained statistically significant after gene-based corrections. Two were in linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 1 for rs1004446 and rs3741211), whereas the third, rs4366464, was independent (r(2) = 0.03). The hazard ratios (HRs) per each additional risk allele were 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 1.34; P-trend = .003) for rs3741211 and 1.44 (95% CI = 1.20 to 1.73; P-trend 〈 .001) for rs4366464. rs4366464 remained statistically significant after correction for all SNPs (P-trend.corr =.04). Prediagnostic IGF1 (HRhighest vs lowest quartile = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.48 to 1.04) and IGFBP3 (HR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.65 to 1.34) levels were not associated with PCa mortality. Conclusions The IGF signaling pathway, primarily IGF2-AS and SSTR2 genes, may be important in PCa survival.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; carcinoma ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; DIAGNOSIS ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TUMORS ; validation ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; STAGE ; COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION ; HEALTH ; DIFFERENCE ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; REGION ; POPULATIONS ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; PREDICTORS ; LIFE-STYLE ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; SINGLE ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; RE ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; CARRIER ; GENOTYPE ; single-nucleotide ; USA ; NO ASSOCIATION ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; nested case-control study ; case control ; case-control ; AFRICAN-AMERICAN
    Abstract: Two recent studies independently identified polymorphisms in the 8q24 region, including a single nucleotide polymorphism (rsl447295), strongly associated with prostate cancer risk. Here, we replicate the overall association in a large nested case-control study from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium using 6,637 prostate cancer cases and 7,361 matched controls. We also examine whether this polymorphism is associated with breast cancer among 2,604 Caucasian breast cancer cases and 3,118 matched controls. The rs1447295 marker was strongly associated with prostate cancer among Caucasians (P = 1.23 x 10(-13)). When we exclude the Multiethnic Cohort samples, previously reported by Freedman et al., the association remains highly significant (P = 8.64 X 10(-13)). Compared with wild-type homozygotes, carriers with one copy of the minor allele had an ORAC = 1.34 (99% confidence intervals, 1.19-1.50) and carriers with two copies of the minor allele had an ORAA = 1.86 (99% confidence intervals, 1.30-2.67). Among African Americans, the genotype association was statistically significant in men diagnosed with prostate cancer at an early age (P = 0.011) and nonsignificant for those diagnosed at a later age (P = 0.924). This difference in risk by age at diagnosis was not present among Caucasians. We found no statistically significant difference in risk when tumors were classified by Gleason score, stage, or mortality. We found no association between rs1447295 and breast cancer risk (P = 0.590). Although the gene responsible has yet to be identified, the validation of this marker in this large sample of prostate cancer cases leaves little room for the possibility of a false-positive result
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17409400
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; CT ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ALPHA ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; ENCODES ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; SNP ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; LINE ; REGION ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; POPULATIONS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; SNPs ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; METAANALYSIS ; biomarker ; INTERVAL ; HAPLOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPES ; single-nucleotide ; USA ; HORMONES ; STEROID-HORMONES ; odds ratio ; cancer research ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; PREDICT ; steroids ; postmenopausal ; block ; HORMONE-LEVELS ; EXONS ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE ; BRAZILIAN PATIENTS ; SERUM ANDROGENS
    Abstract: CYP17 encodes cytochrome p450c17 alpha, which mediates activities essential for the production of sex steroids. Common germ line variation in the CYP17 gene has been related to inconsistent results in breast and prostate cancer, with most studies focusing on the nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) T27C (rs743572). We comprehensively characterized variation in CYP17 by direct sequencing of exons followed by dense genotyping across the 58 kb region around CYP17 in five racial/ethnic populations. Two blocks of strong linkage disequilibrium were identified and nine haplotype-tagging SNPs, including T27C, were chosen to predict common haplotypes (R-h(2) 〉= 0.85). These haplotype-tagging SNPs were genotyped in 8,138 prostate cancer cases and 9,033 controls, and 5,333 breast cancer cases and 7,069 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. We observed borderline significant associations with prostate cancer for rs2486758 [TC versus TT, odds ratios (OR), 1.07; 95% confidence intervals (95% Cl), 1.00-1.14; CC versus TT, OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.95-1.26; P trend = 0.04] and rs6892 (AG versus AA, OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.15; GG versus AA, OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.95-1.30; P trend = 0.03). We also observed marginally significant associations with breast cancer for rs4919687 (GA versus GG, OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.12, AA versus GG, OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.03-1.34; P trend = 0.03) and rs4919682 (CT versus CC, OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.12; TT versus CC, OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33; P trend = 0.04). Common variation at CYP17 was not associated with circulating sex steroid hormones in men or postmenopausal women. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that common germ line variation in CYP17 makes a substantial contribution to postmenopausal breast or prostate cancer susceptibility
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18006912
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; PATHWAY ; PROSTATE ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOLOGY ; MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; CANDIDATE GENE ; POLYMORPHISMS ; hormone ; genetics ; SNP ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; CARRIERS ; molecular biology ; VARIANT ; SNPs ; CANDIDATE GENES ; LEVEL ; USA ; HORMONES ; TESTOSTERONE ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; LOCI ; HORMONE-BINDING GLOBULIN ; SERUM ANDROGENS ; CONSORTIUM ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; sex hormone-binding globulin ; 3 ; Genetic ; genetic variation ; SEX-STEROID-HORMONES
    Abstract: Twin studies suggest a heritable component to circulating sex steroid hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). In the NCI-Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium, 874 SNPs in 37 candidate genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway were examined in relation to circulating levels of SHBG (N = 4720), testosterone (N = 4678), 3 alpha-androstanediol-glucuronide (N = 4767) and 17 beta-estradiol (N = 2014) in Caucasian men. rs1799941 in SHBG is highly significantly associated with circulating levels of SHBG (P = 4.52 x 10(-21)), consistent with previous studies, and testosterone (P = 7.54 x 10(-15)), with mean difference of 26.9 and 14.3%, respectively, comparing wild-type to homozygous variant carriers. Further noteworthy novel findings were observed between SNPs in ESR1 with testosterone levels (rs722208, mean difference = 8.8%, P = 7.37 x 10(-6)) and SRD5A2 with 3 alpha-androstanediol-glucuronide (rs2208532, mean difference = 11.8%, P = 1.82 x 10(-6)). Genetic variation in genes in the sex steroid hormone pathway is associated with differences in circulating SHBG and sex steroid hormones
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19574343
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  • 6
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; carcinoma ; VARIANTS ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; METAANALYSIS ; 8Q24 ; SCAN ; RISK LOCUS ; GENOTYPE IMPUTATION ; NEGATIVE REGULATOR LRIG1
    Abstract: Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P〈5.0E - 08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26151821
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  • 7
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; proliferation ; CELL ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; MODEL ; MODELS ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; COHORT ; HISTORY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; FAMILY ; INDEX ; SEQUENCE ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; NO ; STAGE ; HEALTH ; AGE ; family history ; SNP ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; HUMAN GENOME ; BETA ; POPULATIONS ; case-control studies ; BODY ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; BODIES ; SINGLE ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; FAMILIES ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; GRADE ; regulation ; cell proliferation ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; ESTROGEN ; biomarker ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; analysis ; methods ; HAPLOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPES ; LOCUS ; single-nucleotide ; estrogen receptor ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; USA ; INCREASED RISK ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; SET ; nested case-control study ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX ; ER-BETA ; EXONS ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; TAG SNPS
    Abstract: Background: Estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) may play a role in modulating prostate carcirtogenesis through the regulation of genes related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods: We conducted nested case-control studies in the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) that pooled 8,323 prostate cancer cases and 9,412 controls from seven cohorts. Whites were the predominant ethnic group. We characterized genetic variation in ESR2 by resequencing exons in 190 breast and prostate cancer cases and genotyping a dense set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) spanning the locus in a multiethnic panel of 349 cancer-free subjects. We selected four haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) to capture common ESR2 variation in Whites; these htSNPs were then genotyped in all cohorts. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the association between sequence variants of ESR2 and the risk of prostate cancer. We also investigated the effect modification by age, body mass index, and family history, as well as the association between sequence variants of ESR2 and advanced-stage (〉= T3b, N-1, or M-1) and high-grade (Gleason sum 〉= 8) prostate cancer, respectively. Results: The four tag SNPs in ESR2 were not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk, individually. The global test for the influence of any haplotype on the risk of prostate cancer was not significant (P = 0.31). However, we observed that men carrying two copies of one of the variant haplotypes (TACC) had a 1.46-fold increased risk of prostate cancer (99% confidence interval, 1.06-2.01) compared with men carrying zero copies of this variant haplotype. No SNPs or haplotypes were associated with advanced stage or high grade of prostate cancer. Conclusion: In our analysis focused on genetic variation common in Whites, we observed little evidence for any substantial association of inherited variation in ESR2 with risk of prostate cancer. A nominally significant (P 〈 0.01) association between the TACC haplotype and prostate cancer risk under the recessive model could be a chance finding and, in any event, would seem to contribute only slightly to the overall burden of prostate cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17932344
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; CARCINOGENESIS ; BIOMARKERS ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; hormone ; HEALTH ; AGE ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; GERMLINE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SINGLE ; VARIANT ; DETERMINANTS ; prospective studies ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; HAPLOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPES ; LOCUS ; USA ; HORMONES ; HORMONE LEVELS ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; prospective study ; STEROID-HORMONES ; JAPANESE ; UNIT ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; ESTROGEN-LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; ANDROGEN ; COMMON VARIANT ; SEX-HORMONES ; JAPANESE POPULATION ; androgens ; NONCARRIERS ; FREE TESTOSTERONE ; SERUM ANDROGENS ; CONSORTIUM ; 3 ; Genetic ; genetic variation ; COMMON VARIANTS ; GENE VARIANT ; ALLELIC VARIANTS ; ANDROGEN BIOSYNTHESIS ; UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS
    Abstract: Sex hormones, particularly the androgens, are important for the growth of the prostate gland and have been implicated in prostate cancer carcinogenesis, yet the determinants of endogenous steroid hormone levels remain poorly understood. Twin studies suggest a heritable component for circulating concentrations of sex hormones, although epidemiologic evidence linking steroid hormone gene variants to prostate cancer is limited. Here we report on findings from a comprehensive study of genetic variation at the CYP19A1 locus in relation to prostate cancer risk and to circulating steroid hormone concentrations in men by the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), a large collaborative prospective study. The BPC3 systematically characterized variation in CYP19A1 by targeted resequencing and dense genotyping; selected haplotype-tagging single nuclecitide polymorphisms (htSNP) that efficiently predict common variants in U.S. and Europe-an whites, Latinos, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians; and genotyped these htSNPs; in 8,166 prostate cancer cases and 9,079 study-, age-, and ethnicity-matched controls. CYP19A1 htSNPs, two common missense variants and common haplotypes were not significantly associated with risk of prostate cancer. However, several htSNPs in linkage disequilibrium blocks 3 and 4 were significantly associated with a 5% to 10% difference in estradiol concentrations in men [association per copy of the two-SNP haplotype rs749292-rs727479 (A-A) versus noncarriers; P = 1 x 10(-5)], and with inverse, although less marked changes, in free testosterone concentrations. These results suggest that although germline variation in CYP19A1 characterized by the htSNPs produces measurable differences in sex hormone concentrations in men, they do not substantially influence risk of prostate cancer. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(10):2734-44)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19789370
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  • 9
    Keywords: POPULATION ; RISK ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; AGE ; MEN ; PREDICTORS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; cancer research ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of prostate cancer in a Japanese population identified five novel regions not previously discovered in other ethnicities. In this study, we attempt to replicate these five loci in a series of nested prostate cancer case-control studies of European ancestry. METHODS: We genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP): rs13385191 (chromosome 2p24), rs12653946 (5p15), rs1983891 (6p21), rs339331 (6p22), and rs9600079 (13q22), in 7,956 prostate cancer cases and 8,148 controls from a series of nested case-control studies within the National cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We tested each SNP for association with prostate cancer risk and assessed whether associations differed with respect to disease severity and age of onset. RESULTS: Four SNPs (rs13385191, rs12653946, rs1983891, and rs339331) were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (P values ranging from 0.01 to 1.1 x 10(-5)). Allele frequencies and ORs were overall lower in our population of European descent than in the discovery Asian population. SNP rs13385191 (C2orf43) was only associated with low-stage disease (P = 0.009, case-only test). No other SNP showed association with disease severity or age of onset. We did not replicate the 13q22 SNP, rs9600079 (P = 0.62). CONCLUSIONS: Four SNPs associated with prostate cancer risk in an Asian population are also associated with prostate cancer risk in men of European descent. IMPACT: This study illustrates the importance of evaluation of prostate cancer risk markers across ethnic groups.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22056501
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; COLON-CANCER ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; LIFE-STYLE ; MASS INDEX ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; METAANALYSIS ; VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; sex ; SCAN ; RISK LOCI ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than a dozen loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Here, we examined potential effect-modification between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at 10 of these loci and probable or established environmental risk factors for CRC in 7,016 CRC cases and 9,723 controls from nine cohort and case-control studies. We used meta-analysis of an efficient empirical-Bayes estimator to detect potential multiplicative interactions between each of the SNPs [rs16892766 at8q23.3 (EIF3H/UTP23), rs6983267 at 8q24 (MYC), rs10795668 at 10p14 (FLJ3802842), rs3802842 at 11q23 (LOC120376), rs4444235 at 14q22.2 (BMP4), rs4779584 at 15q13 (GREM1), rs9929218 at 16q22.1 (CDH1), rs4939827 at 18q21 (SMAD7), rs10411210 at 19q13.1 (RHPN2), and rs961253 at 20p12.3 (BMP2)] and select major CRC risk factors (sex, body mass index, height, smoking status, aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, alcohol use, and dietary intake of calcium, folate, red meat, processed meat, vegetables, fruit, and fiber). The strongest statistical evidence for a gene-environment interaction across studies was for vegetable consumption and rs16892766, located on chromosome 8q23.3, near the EIF3H and UTP23 genes (nominal P-interaction = 1.3 x 10(-4); adjusted P = 0.02). The magnitude of the main effect of the SNP increased with increasing levels of vegetable consumption. No other interactions were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, the association of most CRC susceptibility loci identified in initial GWAS seems to be invariant to the other risk factors considered; however, our results suggest potential modification of the rs16892766 effect by vegetable consumption.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22367214
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