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  • 1
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; meningioma ; ASSOCIATION ; EPIC PROJECT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; SERUM-LEVELS ; acoustic neuroma
    Abstract: Background: Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) is important in normal brain development but in the adult brain, IGF-I overexpression may be a risk factor for tumor development. Methods: We examined the association between circulating concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in relation to risk of gliomas (74 low-grade, 206 high-grade gliomas), meningiomas (n = 174) and acoustic neuromas (n = 49) by using a case-control design nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured by ELISAs. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute ORs and corresponding 95% CIs. Results: The risk of low-grade gliomas was elevated with increased IGF-I (OR = 3.60, 95% CI: 1.11-11.7; top vs. bottom quartile) and decreased with elevated IGFBP-3 concentrations (OR = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09-0.84) after mutual adjustment of these two factors; these results became nonsignificant after exclusion of the first year of follow-up. No association was observed for high-grade gliomas or meningiomas. Both high IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations were associated with risk of acoustic neuromas (IGF-I: OR = 6.63, 95% CI: 2.27-19.4, top vs. bottom tertile; IGFBP-3: OR = 7.07, 95% CI: 2.32-21.6), even after excluding the first year of follow-up. Conclusion: High concentrations of IGF-I might be positively associated with risk of low-grade gliomas and acoustic neuromas, although we cannot exclude reverse causation, in particular for low-grade gliomas. Impact: Factors of the IGF axis might be involved in the etiology of some types of brain tumors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21788435
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  • 2
    Keywords: CELL LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; CALCIUM ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; VITAMIN-D-RECEPTOR ; SERUM 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN-D ; 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D-3 ; SUPPLEMENT USE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Individuals with higher blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels have a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), but the influence of 25(OH)D on mortality after CRC diagnosis is unknown. METHODS: The association between prediagnostic 25(OH)D levels and CRC-specific (N = 444) and overall mortality (N = 541) was prospectively examined among 1,202 participants diagnosed with CRC between 1992 and 2003 in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs and corresponding 95% CIs according to 25(OH)D quintiles and genetic variation within the VDR and CASR genes. Potential dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic effect modifiers were also investigated. RESULTS: There were 541 deaths, 444 (82%) due to CRC. Mean follow-up was 73 months. In multivariable analysis, higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a statistically significant reduction in CRC-specific (P(trend) = 0.04) and overall mortality (P(trend) = 0.01). Participants with 25(OH)D levels in the highest quintile had an adjusted HR of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.50-0.93) for CRC-specific mortality and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.50-0.88) for overall mortality, compared with the lowest quintile. Except for a possible interaction by prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (P(interaction) = 0.01), no other potential modifying factors related to CRC survival were noted. The VDR (FokI and BsmI) and CASR (rs1801725) genotypes were not associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: High prediagnostic 25(OH)D levels are associated with improved survival of patients with CRC. Impact: Our findings may stimulate further research directed at investigating the effects of blood vitamin D levels before, at, and after CRC diagnosis on outcomes in CRC patients. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(4); 582-93. (c)2012 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22278364
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; THERAPY ; RISK ; RISKS ; PROTEIN ; colon ; CYCLE ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; HEALTH ; resistance ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; COLON-CANCER ; cholesterol ; C-REACTIVE PROTEIN ; body mass index ; nutrition ; education ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; CROHNS-DISEASE ; inflammation ; insulin ; SERUM ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; colon cancer ; METAANALYSIS ; PHASE ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; colorectal neoplasms ; C-PEPTIDE ; REPLACEMENT ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; INFLAMMATORY MARKERS ; nested case-control study ; BODY-MASS ; COLLECTION ; HORMONE-THERAPY ; Abdominal ; Hyperinsulinism ; journals ; nested case control study ; hyperglycemia ; hyperlipidemias
    Abstract: The authors investigated associations between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and colon and rectal cancer risk in a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (1992-2003) among 1,096 incident cases and 1,096 controls selected using risk-set sampling and matched on study center, age, sex, time of blood collection, fasting status, menopausal status, menstrual cycle phase, and hormone replacement therapy. In conditional logistic regression with adjustment for education, smoking, nutritional factors, body mass index, and waist circumference, CRP showed a significant nonlinear association with colon cancer risk but not rectal cancer risk. Multivariable-adjusted relative risks for CRP concentrations of 〉= 3.0 mg/L versus 〈 1.0 mg/L were 1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 1.85; P-trend = 0.01) for colon cancer and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.57; P-trend = 0.65) for rectal cancer. Colon cancer risk was significantly increased in men (relative risk = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.73; P-trend = 0.01) but not in women (relative risk = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.67, 1.68; P-trend = 0.13). Additional adjustment for C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol did not attenuate these results. These data provide evidence that elevated CRP concentrations are related to a higher risk of colon cancer but not rectal cancer, predominantly among men and independently of obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20634278
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; OBESITY ; COLON-CANCER ; nutrition ; IGF-I ; SERUM-LEVELS ; VITAMIN-D STATUS ; CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR ; PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM ; PTH/PTHRP RECEPTOR
    Abstract: Background: Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been proposed to play a promoting role in carcinogenesis. However, no epidemiologic studies have yet directly investigated its role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: A case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort was conducted with 1,214 incident, sporadic CRC cases matched to 1,214 controls. Circulating prediagnostic PTH and 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH) D] concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Detailed dietary and lifestyle questionnaire data were collected at baseline. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the association between circulating PTH and CRC risk. Results: In multivariate analyses [including adjustment for 25(OH) D concentration] with a priori defined cutoff points, high levels of serum PTH (〉= 65 ng/L) compared with medium PTH levels of 30-65 ng/L were associated with increased CRC risk (RR = 1.41,95% CI: 1.03-1.93). In analyses by sex, the CRC risk was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.14-2.75) and 1.15 (95% CI: 0.73-1.84) in men and women, respectively (P-heterogeneity = 0.01). In subgroup analyses by anatomical subsite, the risk for colon cancer was RR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.03-2.34, and for rectal cancer RR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.72-2.01 (P-heterogeneity = 0.21). Effect modification by various risk factors was examined. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that high serum PTH levels may be associated with incident, sporadic CRC in Western European populations, and in particular among men. Impact: To our knowledge, this is the first study on PTH and CRC. The role of PTH in carcinogenesis needs to be further investigated.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21378267
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