Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; ACIDS ; NO ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; fatty acids ; FATTY-ACIDS ; DIETARY ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; CONSUMPTION ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; CALIBRATION ; FOOD ; ASSOCIATIONS ; colon cancer ; WEIGHT ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; EPIC PROJECT ; HEIGHT
    Abstract: A link between unsaturated fatty acids or phytonutrients and reduced risk of colorectal cancer has been suggested. However, the effects of higher intake of dietary sources of these nutrients, such as the nuts and seeds food group, are less clear. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nut and seed intake on colorectal cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, a large prospective cohort study involving 10 European countries. Total nut and seed intake was determined from country-specific dietary questionnaires. The data set included 478,040 subjects (141,988 men, 336,052 women) with a total of 855 (327 men, 528 women) colon and 474 (215 men, 259 women) rectal cancer cases. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, stratified by center and controlled for fruit intake, dietary fiber, energy, height, weight, sex, age, physical activity, and smoking, was used. The data show no association between higher intake of nuts and seeds and risk of colorectal, colon, and rectal cancers in men and women combined, but a significant inverse association was observed in subgroup analyses for colon cancer in women at the highest (〉6.2 g/d) versus the lowest (nonconsumers; hazard ratio, 0.69;, 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.95) category of intake and for the linear effect of log-transformed intake (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.98), with no associations in men. It is not evident from this data why there may be a stronger association in women or why it may be limited to the colon, suggesting that much, further research is necessary
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15466975
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; human ; VITRO ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACIDS ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; fatty acids ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; RELATIVE RISK ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; ADIPOSE-TISSUE ; POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ASSOCIATIONS ; INTERVAL ; prospective ; MEAT INTAKE ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; fish consumption ; N-3
    Abstract: There is current interest in fish consumption and marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and breast cancer risk. Some in vitro and animal studies have suggested an inhibitory effect of marine n-3 fatty acids on breast cancer growth, but the results from epidemiological studies that have examined the association between fish consumption and breast cancer risk in humans are inconsistent. We examined fish consumption and breast cancer risk in 310,671 women aged between 25 and 70 yr at recruitment into the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The participants completed a dietary questionnaire between 1992-98 and were followed up for incidence of breast cancer for a median of 6.4 yr. Hazard ratio for breast cancer by intake of total and lean and fatty fish were estimated, stratified by study centre and adjusted for established breast cancer risk factors. During follow-up, 4,776 invasive incident breast cancers were reported. No significant associations between intake of total fish and breast cancer risk were observed, hazard ratio (HR) 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99-1.02; p = 0.28 per 10 g fish/day). When examining lean and ratty fish separately, we round a positive significant association only in the highest quintile for fatty fish (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01-1.26), but test for trend was not significant (p = 0.10). No associations with breast cancer risk were observed when the study participants were subdivided by menopausal status. Although the period of follow-up is relatively short, the results provide no evidence for an association between fish intake and breast cancer risk. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16470807
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; DISTINCT ; MECHANISM ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; mechanisms ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; Jun ; cholesterol ; DIET ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; NUTRIENTS ; FRAMEWORK ; RE ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; PRESERVATION ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; NORTHERN ; processed meat ; 24-hour dietary recall ; ANIMAL PRODUCTS ; CHOLESTEROL OXIDATION ; cooking methods ; DONE RED MEAT
    Abstract: Objective: There is increasing evidence for a significant effect of processed meat (PM) intake on cancer risk. However, refined knowledge on how components of this heterogeneous food group are associated with cancer risk is still missing. Here, actual data on the intake of PM subcategories is given; within a food-based approach we considered preservation methods, cooking methods and nutrient content for stratification, in order to address most of the aetiologically relevant hypotheses. Design and setting: Standardised computerised 24-hour diet recall interviews were collected within the framework of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study in 27 centres across 10 European countries. Subjects: Subjects were 22 924 women and 13 031 men aged 35 - 74 years. Results: Except for the so-called 'health-conscious' cohort in the UK, energy-adjusted total PM intake ranged between 11.1 and 47.9 g day(-1) in women and 18.8 and 88.5 g day(-1) in men. Ham, salami-type sausages and heated sausages contributed most to the overall PM intake. The intake of cured (addition of nitrate/nitrite) PM was highest in the German, Dutch and northern European EPIC centres, with up to 68.8 g day(-1) in men. The same was true for smoked PM (up to 51.8 g day(-1)). However, due to the different manufacturing practice, the highest average intake of NaNO2 through PM consumption was found for the Spanish centres (5.4 mg day(-1) in men) as compared with German and British centres. Spanish centres also showed the highest intake of NaCl-rich types of PM; most cholesterol- and iron-rich PM was consumed in central and northern European centres. Possibly hazardous cooking methods were more often used for PM preparation in central and northern European centres. Conclusions: We applied a food-based categorisation of PM that addresses aetiologically relevant mechanisms for cancer development and found distinct differences in dietary intake of these categories of PM across European cohorts. This predisposes EPIC to further investigate the role of PM in cancer aetiology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870017
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; cohort study ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ONCOLOGY ; INCREASE ; breast neoplasm ; ESTROGEN ; INTERVAL ; methods ; DIETARY-FOLATE INTAKE ; prospective ; INCREASED RISK ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; INCREASES ; TREND ANALYSIS
    Abstract: Objective Most epidemiologic studies have suggested an increased risk of breast cancer with increasing alcohol intake. Using data from 274,688 women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC), we investigated the relation between alcohol intake and the risk of breast cancer. Methods Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) based on Cox proportional hazard models were calculated using reported intake of alcohol, recent (at baseline) and lifetime exposure. We adjusted for known risk factors and stratified according to study center as well as potentially modifying host factors. Results During 6.4 years of follow up, 4,285 invasive cases of breast cancer within the age group 35-75 years were identified. For all countries together the IRR per 10 g/day higher recent alcohol intake (continuous) was 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-1.05). When adjusted, no association was seen between lifetime alcohol intake and risk of breast cancer. No difference in risk was shown between users and non-users of HRT, and there was no significant interaction between alcohol intake and BMI, HRT or dietary folate. Conclusion This large European study supports previous findings that recent alcohol intake increases the risk of breast cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17364225
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...