Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; OBESITY ; BODY ; body mass index ; VASCULAR-DISEASE ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; ADIPOSITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; waist-hip ratio ; Diabetes Mellitus ; Diabetes Complications ; COMPETING RISKS ; ANTHROPOMETRIC INDEXES ; CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY ; EXERCISE CAPACITY ; TO-HEIGHT RATIO
    Abstract: Individuals with diabetes mellitus are advised to achieve a healthy weight to prevent complications. However, fat mass distribution has hardly been investigated as a risk factor for diabetes complications. The authors studied associations between body mass index, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and waist/height ratio and mortality among individuals with diabetes mellitus. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, a subcohort was defined as 5,435 individuals with a confirmed self-report of diabetes mellitus at baseline in 1992-2000. Participants were aged 57.3 (standard deviation, 6.3) years, 54% were men, the median diabetes duration was 4.6 (interquartile range, 2.0-9.8) years, and 22% of the participants used insulin. Body mass index, as indicator of general obesity, was not associated with higher mortality, whereas all measurements of abdominal obesity showed a positive association. Associations generally were slightly weaker in women. The strongest association was observed for waist/height ratio: In the fifth quintile, the hazard rate ratio was 1.88 (95% confidence interval: 1.33, 2.65) for men and 2.46 (95% confidence interval: 1.46, 4.14) for women. Measurements of abdominal, but not general, adiposity were associated with higher mortality in diabetic individuals. The waist/height ratio showed the strongest association. Respective indicators might be investigated in risk prediction models
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21616928
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK-FACTORS ; FATTY-ACIDS ; nutrition ; Mediterranean diet ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; QUALITY INDEX ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; Chronic disease ; DASH DIET
    Abstract: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Few studies have investigated the relationship between predefined dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes incidence; little is known about the generalisability of these associations. We aimed to assess the association between predefined dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes risk in European populations. METHODS: From among a case-cohort of 12,403 incident diabetes cases and 16,154 subcohort members nested within the prospective European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, we used data on 9,682 cases and 12,595 subcohort participants from seven countries. Habitual dietary intake was assessed at baseline with country-specific dietary questionnaires. Two diet-quality scores (alternative Healthy Eating Index [aHEI], Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] score) and three reduced rank regression (RRR)-derived dietary-pattern scores were constructed. Country-specific HRs were calculated and combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: After multivariable adjustment, including body size, the aHEI and DASH scores were not significantly associated with diabetes, although for the aHEI there was a tendency towards an inverse association in countries with higher mean age. We observed inverse associations of the three RRR-derived dietary-pattern scores with diabetes: HRs (95% CIs) for a 1-SD difference were 0.91 (0.86, 0.96), 0.92 (0.84, 1.01) and 0.87 (0.82, 0.92). Random-effects meta-analyses revealed heterogeneity between countries that was explainable by differences in the age of participants or the distribution of dietary intake. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Adherence to specific RRR-derived dietary patterns, commonly characterised by high intake of fruits or vegetables and low intake of processed meat, sugar-sweetened beverages and refined grains, may lower type 2 diabetes risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24196190
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISEASE ; RISK-FACTORS ; HUMANS ; DIETARY ; PROJECT ; MELLITUS ; biomarker ; DAIRY PRODUCT INTAKE ; DE-NOVO LIPOGENESIS
    Abstract: Background Conflicting evidence exists regarding the association between saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and type 2 diabetes. In this longitudinal case-cohort study, we aimed to investigate the prospective associations between objectively measured individual plasma phospholipid SFAs and incident type 2 diabetes in EPIC-InterAct participants. Methods The EPIC-InterAct case-cohort study includes 12 403 people with incident type 2 diabetes and a representative subcohort of 16 154 individuals who were selected from a cohort of 340 234 European participants with 3 . 99 million person-years of follow-up (the EPIC study). Incident type 2 diabetes was ascertained until Dec 31, 2007, by a review of several sources of evidence. Gas chromatography was used to measure the distribution of fatty acids in plasma phospholipids (mol%); samples from people with type 2 diabetes and subcohort participants were processed in a random order by centre, and laboratory staff were masked to participant characteristics. We estimated country-specific hazard ratios (HRs) for associations per SD of each SFA with incident type 2 diabetes using Prentice-weighted Cox regression, which is weighted for case-cohort sampling, and pooled our findings using random-effects meta-analysis. Findings SFAs accounted for 46% of total plasma phospholipid fatty acids. In adjusted analyses, different individual SFAs were associated with incident type 2 diabetes in opposing directions. Even-chain SFAs that were measured (14: 0 [myristic acid], 16: 0 [palmitic acid], and 18: 0 [stearic acid]) were positively associated with incident type 2 diabetes (HR [95% CI] per SD difference: myristic acid 1.15 [95% CI 1.09-1.22], palmitic acid 1.26 [1.15-1.37], and stearic acid 1.06 [1.00-1.13]). By contrast, measured odd-chain SFAs (15: 0 [pentadecanoic acid] and 17: 0 [heptadecanoic acid]) were inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes (HR [95% CI] per 1 SD difference: 0.79 [0.73-0.85] for pentadecanoic acid and 0.67 [0.63-0.71] for heptadecanoic acid), as were measured longer-chain SFAs (20: 0 [arachidic acid], 22:0 [behenic acid], 23:0 [tricosanoic acid], and 24:0 [lignoceric acid]), with HRs ranging from 0.72 to 0.81 (95% CIs ranging between 0.61 and 0.92). Our findings were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Interpretation Different individual plasma phospholipid SFAs were associated with incident type 2 diabetes in opposite directions, which suggests that SFAs are not homogeneous in their effects. Our findings emphasise the importance of the recognition of subtypes of these fatty acids. An improved understanding of differences in sources of individual SFAs from dietary intake versus endogenous metabolism is needed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25107467
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK-FACTORS ; WOMEN ; POLYPHENOLS ; nutrition ; LIFE-STYLE ; INSULIN SENSITIVITY ; US MEN ; Food sources
    Abstract: OBJECTIVETo study the association between dietary flavonoid and lignan intakes, and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes among European populations.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThe European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-InterAct case-cohort study included 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 participants from among 340,234 participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up in eight European countries. At baseline, country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used. A flavonoid and lignan food composition database was developed from the Phenol-Explorer, the U.K. Food Standards Agency, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture databases. Hazard ratios (HRs) from country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression models were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis.RESULTSIn multivariable models, a trend for an inverse association between total flavonoid intake and type 2 diabetes was observed (HR for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.90 [95% CI 0.77-1.04]; P value trend = 0.040), but not with lignans (HR 0.88 [95% CI 0.72-1.07]; P value trend = 0.119). Among flavonoid subclasses, flavonols (HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.69-0.95]; P value trend = 0.020) and flavanols (HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.68-0.99]; P value trend = 0.012), including flavan-3-ol monomers (HR 0.73 [95% CI 0.57-0.93]; P value trend = 0.029), were associated with a significantly reduced hazard of diabetes.CONCLUSIONSProspective findings in this large European cohort demonstrate inverse associations between flavonoids, particularly flavanols and flavonols, and incident type 2 diabetes. This suggests a potential protective role of eating a diet rich in flavonoids, a dietary pattern based on plant-based foods, in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24130345
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...