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  • Reproducibility of Results  (16)
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (16)
  • American Chemical Society
  • Blackwell Science Pty
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Publisher
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (16)
  • American Chemical Society
  • Blackwell Science Pty
Years
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-03-20
    Description: Targeted therapies have demonstrated efficacy against specific subsets of molecularly defined cancers. Although most patients with lung cancer are stratified according to a single oncogenic driver, cancers harbouring identical activating genetic mutations show large variations in their responses to the same targeted therapy. The biology underlying this heterogeneity is not well understood, and the impact of co-existing genetic mutations, especially the loss of tumour suppressors, has not been fully explored. Here we use genetically engineered mouse models to conduct a 'co-clinical' trial that mirrors an ongoing human clinical trial in patients with KRAS-mutant lung cancers. This trial aims to determine if the MEK inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244) increases the efficacy of docetaxel, a standard of care chemotherapy. Our studies demonstrate that concomitant loss of either p53 (also known as Tp53) or Lkb1 (also known as Stk11), two clinically relevant tumour suppressors, markedly impaired the response of Kras-mutant cancers to docetaxel monotherapy. We observed that the addition of selumetinib provided substantial benefit for mice with lung cancer caused by Kras and Kras and p53 mutations, but mice with Kras and Lkb1 mutations had primary resistance to this combination therapy. Pharmacodynamic studies, including positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT), identified biological markers in mice and patients that provide a rationale for the differential efficacy of these therapies in the different genotypes. These co-clinical results identify predictive genetic biomarkers that should be validated by interrogating samples from patients enrolled on the concurrent clinical trial. These studies also highlight the rationale for synchronous co-clinical trials, not only to anticipate the results of ongoing human clinical trials, but also to generate clinically relevant hypotheses that can inform the analysis and design of human studies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3385933/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3385933/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Zhao -- Cheng, Katherine -- Walton, Zandra -- Wang, Yuchuan -- Ebi, Hiromichi -- Shimamura, Takeshi -- Liu, Yan -- Tupper, Tanya -- Ouyang, Jing -- Li, Jie -- Gao, Peng -- Woo, Michele S -- Xu, Chunxiao -- Yanagita, Masahiko -- Altabef, Abigail -- Wang, Shumei -- Lee, Charles -- Nakada, Yuji -- Pena, Christopher G -- Sun, Yanping -- Franchetti, Yoko -- Yao, Catherine -- Saur, Amy -- Cameron, Michael D -- Nishino, Mizuki -- Hayes, D Neil -- Wilkerson, Matthew D -- Roberts, Patrick J -- Lee, Carrie B -- Bardeesy, Nabeel -- Butaney, Mohit -- Chirieac, Lucian R -- Costa, Daniel B -- Jackman, David -- Sharpless, Norman E -- Castrillon, Diego H -- Demetri, George D -- Janne, Pasi A -- Pandolfi, Pier Paolo -- Cantley, Lewis C -- Kung, Andrew L -- Engelman, Jeffrey A -- Wong, Kwok-Kin -- 1U01CA141576/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA122794/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA137008/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA137008-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA137181/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA140594/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA147940/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K23 CA157631/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA120964/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016086/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA090578/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA090578-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50CA090578/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA122794/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA122794-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA137008/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA137008-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA137181/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA137181-01A2/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140594/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140594-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA163896/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 CA147940/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 CA147940-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA141576/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA141576-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Mar 18;483(7391):613-7. doi: 10.1038/nature10937.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22425996" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols ; Benzimidazoles/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics/metabolism ; *Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic ; *Disease Models, Animal ; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical ; Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 ; Genes, p53/genetics ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/*drug therapy/enzymology/*genetics/metabolism ; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects ; Mice ; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors ; Mutation/genetics ; Pharmacogenetics/*methods ; Positron-Emission Tomography ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/deficiency/genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/genetics/metabolism ; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic ; Reproducibility of Results ; Taxoids/*therapeutic use ; Tomography, X-Ray Computed ; Treatment Outcome ; ras Proteins/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis, and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast cancer have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here we examine the genomes of 100 tumours for somatic copy number changes and mutations in the coding exons of protein-coding genes. The number of somatic mutations varied markedly between individual tumours. We found strong correlations between mutation number, age at which cancer was diagnosed and cancer histological grade, and observed multiple mutational signatures, including one present in about ten per cent of tumours characterized by numerous mutations of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. Driver mutations were identified in several new cancer genes including AKT2, ARID1B, CASP8, CDKN1B, MAP3K1, MAP3K13, NCOR1, SMARCD1 and TBX3. Among the 100 tumours, we found driver mutations in at least 40 cancer genes and 73 different combinations of mutated cancer genes. The results highlight the substantial genetic diversity underlying this common disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428862/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428862/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stephens, Philip J -- Tarpey, Patrick S -- Davies, Helen -- Van Loo, Peter -- Greenman, Chris -- Wedge, David C -- Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Martin, Sancha -- Varela, Ignacio -- Bignell, Graham R -- Yates, Lucy R -- Papaemmanuil, Elli -- Beare, David -- Butler, Adam -- Cheverton, Angela -- Gamble, John -- Hinton, Jonathan -- Jia, Mingming -- Jayakumar, Alagu -- Jones, David -- Latimer, Calli -- Lau, King Wai -- McLaren, Stuart -- McBride, David J -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mudie, Laura -- Raine, Keiran -- Rad, Roland -- Chapman, Michael Spencer -- Teague, Jon -- Easton, Douglas -- Langerod, Anita -- Oslo Breast Cancer Consortium (OSBREAC) -- Lee, Ming Ta Michael -- Shen, Chen-Yang -- Tee, Benita Tan Kiat -- Huimin, Bernice Wong -- Broeks, Annegien -- Vargas, Ana Cristina -- Turashvili, Gulisa -- Martens, John -- Fatima, Aquila -- Miron, Penelope -- Chin, Suet-Feung -- Thomas, Gilles -- Boyault, Sandrine -- Mariani, Odette -- Lakhani, Sunil R -- van de Vijver, Marc -- van 't Veer, Laura -- Foekens, John -- Desmedt, Christine -- Sotiriou, Christos -- Tutt, Andrew -- Caldas, Carlos -- Reis-Filho, Jorge S -- Aparicio, Samuel A J R -- Salomon, Anne Vincent -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Campbell, Peter J -- Futreal, P Andrew -- Stratton, Michael R -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 10118/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- CA089393/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- WT088340MA/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Chief Scientist Office/United Kingdom -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 16;486(7403):400-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11017.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722201" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Breast Neoplasms/classification/*genetics/pathology ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/*genetics ; Cytosine/metabolism ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Female ; Humans ; JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism ; Mutagenesis/*genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neoplasm Grading ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Signal Transduction/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-07-13
    Description: Recent advances in whole-genome sequencing have brought the vision of personal genomics and genomic medicine closer to reality. However, current methods lack clinical accuracy and the ability to describe the context (haplotypes) in which genome variants co-occur in a cost-effective manner. Here we describe a low-cost DNA sequencing and haplotyping process, long fragment read (LFR) technology, which is similar to sequencing long single DNA molecules without cloning or separation of metaphase chromosomes. In this study, ten LFR libraries were made using only approximately 100 picograms of human DNA per sample. Up to 97% of the heterozygous single nucleotide variants were assembled into long haplotype contigs. Removal of false positive single nucleotide variants not phased by multiple LFR haplotypes resulted in a final genome error rate of 1 in 10 megabases. Cost-effective and accurate genome sequencing and haplotyping from 10-20 human cells, as demonstrated here, will enable comprehensive genetic studies and diverse clinical applications.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3397394/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3397394/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Peters, Brock A -- Kermani, Bahram G -- Sparks, Andrew B -- Alferov, Oleg -- Hong, Peter -- Alexeev, Andrei -- Jiang, Yuan -- Dahl, Fredrik -- Tang, Y Tom -- Haas, Juergen -- Robasky, Kimberly -- Zaranek, Alexander Wait -- Lee, Je-Hyuk -- Ball, Madeleine Price -- Peterson, Joseph E -- Perazich, Helena -- Yeung, George -- Liu, Jia -- Chen, Linsu -- Kennemer, Michael I -- Pothuraju, Kaliprasad -- Konvicka, Karel -- Tsoupko-Sitnikov, Mike -- Pant, Krishna P -- Ebert, Jessica C -- Nilsen, Geoffrey B -- Baccash, Jonathan -- Halpern, Aaron L -- Church, George M -- Drmanac, Radoje -- P50 HG005550/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P50HG005550/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 11;487(7406):190-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11236.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Complete Genomics, Inc., 2071 Stierlin Court, Mountain View, California 94043, USA. bpeters@completegenomics.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22785314" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Cell Line ; Female ; Gene Silencing ; Genetic Variation ; *Genome, Human ; Genomics/*methods ; Haplotypes ; Humans ; Mutation ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sequence Analysis, DNA/economics/*methods/standards
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-03-08
    Description: Despite their importance, the molecular circuits that control the differentiation of naive T cells remain largely unknown. Recent studies that reconstructed regulatory networks in mammalian cells have focused on short-term responses and relied on perturbation-based approaches that cannot be readily applied to primary T cells. Here we combine transcriptional profiling at high temporal resolution, novel computational algorithms, and innovative nanowire-based perturbation tools to systematically derive and experimentally validate a model of the dynamic regulatory network that controls the differentiation of mouse TH17 cells, a proinflammatory T-cell subset that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases. The TH17 transcriptional network consists of two self-reinforcing, but mutually antagonistic, modules, with 12 novel regulators, the coupled action of which may be essential for maintaining the balance between TH17 and other CD4(+) T-cell subsets. Our study identifies and validates 39 regulatory factors, embeds them within a comprehensive temporal network and reveals its organizational principles; it also highlights novel drug targets for controlling TH17 cell differentiation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3637864/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3637864/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yosef, Nir -- Shalek, Alex K -- Gaublomme, Jellert T -- Jin, Hulin -- Lee, Youjin -- Awasthi, Amit -- Wu, Chuan -- Karwacz, Katarzyna -- Xiao, Sheng -- Jorgolli, Marsela -- Gennert, David -- Satija, Rahul -- Shakya, Arvind -- Lu, Diana Y -- Trombetta, John J -- Pillai, Meenu R -- Ratcliffe, Peter J -- Coleman, Mathew L -- Bix, Mark -- Tantin, Dean -- Park, Hongkun -- Kuchroo, Vijay K -- Regev, Aviv -- 1P50HG006193-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- 5DP1OD003893-03/OD/NIH HHS/ -- AI073748/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI45757/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DP1 OD003893/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP1 OD003958/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP1OD003958-01/OD/NIH HHS/ -- F32 HD075541/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- K01 DK090105/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- NS 30843/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS045937/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI045757/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI073748/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P50 HG006193/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI100873/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS030843/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS045937/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Apr 25;496(7446):461-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11981. Epub 2013 Mar 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23467089" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, CD95/metabolism ; Cell Differentiation/*genetics ; Cells, Cultured ; DNA/genetics/metabolism ; Forkhead Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Gene Regulatory Networks/*genetics ; Genome/genetics ; Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis ; Interleukin-2/genetics ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Nanowires ; Neoplasm Proteins/metabolism ; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism ; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism ; Reproducibility of Results ; Silicon ; Th17 Cells/*cytology/immunology/*metabolism ; Time Factors ; Trans-Activators/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-11-05
    Description: Whole exome sequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the genetic architecture of human disease. Here we apply it to more than 2,500 simplex families, each having a child with an autistic spectrum disorder. By comparing affected to unaffected siblings, we show that 13% of de novo missense mutations and 43% of de novo likely gene-disrupting (LGD) mutations contribute to 12% and 9% of diagnoses, respectively. Including copy number variants, coding de novo mutations contribute to about 30% of all simplex and 45% of female diagnoses. Almost all LGD mutations occur opposite wild-type alleles. LGD targets in affected females significantly overlap the targets in males of lower intelligence quotient (IQ), but neither overlaps significantly with targets in males of higher IQ. We estimate that LGD mutation in about 400 genes can contribute to the joint class of affected females and males of lower IQ, with an overlapping and similar number of genes vulnerable to contributory missense mutation. LGD targets in the joint class overlap with published targets for intellectual disability and schizophrenia, and are enriched for chromatin modifiers, FMRP-associated genes and embryonically expressed genes. Most of the significance for the latter comes from affected females.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4313871/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4313871/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Iossifov, Ivan -- O'Roak, Brian J -- Sanders, Stephan J -- Ronemus, Michael -- Krumm, Niklas -- Levy, Dan -- Stessman, Holly A -- Witherspoon, Kali T -- Vives, Laura -- Patterson, Karynne E -- Smith, Joshua D -- Paeper, Bryan -- Nickerson, Deborah A -- Dea, Jeanselle -- Dong, Shan -- Gonzalez, Luis E -- Mandell, Jeffrey D -- Mane, Shrikant M -- Murtha, Michael T -- Sullivan, Catherine A -- Walker, Michael F -- Waqar, Zainulabedin -- Wei, Liping -- Willsey, A Jeremy -- Yamrom, Boris -- Lee, Yoon-ha -- Grabowska, Ewa -- Dalkic, Ertugrul -- Wang, Zihua -- Marks, Steven -- Andrews, Peter -- Leotta, Anthony -- Kendall, Jude -- Hakker, Inessa -- Rosenbaum, Julie -- Ma, Beicong -- Rodgers, Linda -- Troge, Jennifer -- Narzisi, Giuseppe -- Yoon, Seungtai -- Schatz, Michael C -- Ye, Kenny -- McCombie, W Richard -- Shendure, Jay -- Eichler, Evan E -- State, Matthew W -- Wigler, Michael -- P30 CA016359/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007266/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 HD083091/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000142/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Nov 13;515(7526):216-21. doi: 10.1038/nature13908. Epub 2014 Oct 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; 1] Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Molecular &Medical Genetics, Oregon Health &Science University, Portland, Oregon 97208, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA [2] Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [2] Center for Bioinformatics, State Key Laboratory of Protein and Plant Gene Research, School of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. ; Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; Yale Center for Genomic Analysis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA. ; 1] Center for Bioinformatics, State Key Laboratory of Protein and Plant Gene Research, School of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China [2] National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206, China. ; 1] Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA [2] New York Genome Center, New York, New York 10013, USA. ; 1] Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA [2] Department of Medical Biology, Bulent Ecevit University School of Medicine, 67600 Zonguldak, Turkey. ; Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, USA. ; 1] Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; 1] Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94158, USA [2] Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [3] Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA [4] Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25363768" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Child ; Child Development Disorders, Pervasive/*genetics ; Cluster Analysis ; Exome/genetics ; Female ; Genes ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics ; Humans ; Intelligence Tests ; Male ; Mutation/*genetics ; Open Reading Frames/*genetics ; Reproducibility of Results
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a approximately 20 degrees rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Yanyong -- Zhou, X Edward -- Gao, Xiang -- He, Yuanzheng -- Liu, Wei -- Ishchenko, Andrii -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Han, Gye Won -- Xu, Qingping -- de Waal, Parker W -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Moeller, Arne -- West, Graham M -- Pascal, Bruce D -- Van Eps, Ned -- Caro, Lydia N -- Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A -- Lee, Regina J -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- Gu, Xin -- Pal, Kuntal -- Ma, Jinming -- Zhi, Xiaoyong -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Gati, Cornelius -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Basu, Shibom -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Coe, Jesse -- Liu, Haiguang -- Lisova, Stella -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Jiang, Yi -- Tan, Minjia -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Li, Jun -- Wang, Meitian -- Zheng, Zhong -- Li, Dianfan -- Howe, Nicole -- Zhao, Yingming -- Standfuss, Jorg -- Diederichs, Kay -- Dong, Yuhui -- Potter, Clinton S -- Carragher, Bridget -- Caffrey, Martin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Ernst, Oliver P -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Gurevich, Vsevolod V -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- EY005216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM077561/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM097463/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM104212/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM108635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30EY000331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK066202/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM087413/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109955/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):561-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14656. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Joint Center for Structural Genomics, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; The National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Haidian District, Beijing 10084, China. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; School of Medicine and School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA [2] Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Laboratory of Biomolecular Research at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biology, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. ; Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. ; 1] Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [2] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 2F Building 6, 99 Haike Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 201210, China. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200343" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arrestin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lasers ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Reproducibility of Results ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; X-Rays
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-02-05
    Description: Genomic structural variants (SVs) are abundant in humans, differing from other forms of variation in extent, origin and functional impact. Despite progress in SV characterization, the nucleotide resolution architecture of most SVs remains unknown. We constructed a map of unbalanced SVs (that is, copy number variants) based on whole genome DNA sequencing data from 185 human genomes, integrating evidence from complementary SV discovery approaches with extensive experimental validations. Our map encompassed 22,025 deletions and 6,000 additional SVs, including insertions and tandem duplications. Most SVs (53%) were mapped to nucleotide resolution, which facilitated analysing their origin and functional impact. We examined numerous whole and partial gene deletions with a genotyping approach and observed a depletion of gene disruptions amongst high frequency deletions. Furthermore, we observed differences in the size spectra of SVs originating from distinct formation mechanisms, and constructed a map of SV hotspots formed by common mechanisms. Our analytical framework and SV map serves as a resource for sequencing-based association studies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077050/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077050/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mills, Ryan E -- Walter, Klaudia -- Stewart, Chip -- Handsaker, Robert E -- Chen, Ken -- Alkan, Can -- Abyzov, Alexej -- Yoon, Seungtai Chris -- Ye, Kai -- Cheetham, R Keira -- Chinwalla, Asif -- Conrad, Donald F -- Fu, Yutao -- Grubert, Fabian -- Hajirasouliha, Iman -- Hormozdiari, Fereydoun -- Iakoucheva, Lilia M -- Iqbal, Zamin -- Kang, Shuli -- Kidd, Jeffrey M -- Konkel, Miriam K -- Korn, Joshua -- Khurana, Ekta -- Kural, Deniz -- Lam, Hugo Y K -- Leng, Jing -- Li, Ruiqiang -- Li, Yingrui -- Lin, Chang-Yun -- Luo, Ruibang -- Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine -- Nemesh, James -- Peckham, Heather E -- Rausch, Tobias -- Scally, Aylwyn -- Shi, Xinghua -- Stromberg, Michael P -- Stutz, Adrian M -- Urban, Alexander Eckehart -- Walker, Jerilyn A -- Wu, Jiantao -- Zhang, Yujun -- Zhang, Zhengdong D -- Batzer, Mark A -- Ding, Li -- Marth, Gabor T -- McVean, Gil -- Sebat, Jonathan -- Snyder, Michael -- Wang, Jun -- Ye, Kenny -- Eichler, Evan E -- Gerstein, Mark B -- Hurles, Matthew E -- Lee, Charles -- McCarroll, Steven A -- Korbel, Jan O -- 1000 Genomes Project -- 062023/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 077009/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 077014/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 077192/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 085532/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- G0701805/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G1000758/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P01 HG004120/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221-03S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221-03S2/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P41 HG004221-03S3/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM059290/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM081533/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM081533-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM081533-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM081533-03/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM081533-04/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM59290/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004719/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004719-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004719-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004719-02S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004719-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004719-04/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH091350/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- RC2 HG005552/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 HG005552-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 HG005552-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG005209/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG005209-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 HG005209-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Feb 3;470(7332):59-65. doi: 10.1038/nature09708.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21293372" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: DNA Copy Number Variations/*genetics ; Gene Duplication/genetics ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics ; *Genetics, Population ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Genotype ; Humans ; Mutagenesis, Insertional/genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Sequence Deletion/genetics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: It is well established that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a strong genetic component; however, for at least 70% of cases, the underlying genetic cause is unknown. Under the hypothesis that de novo mutations underlie a substantial fraction of the risk for developing ASD in families with no previous history of ASD or related phenotypes--so-called sporadic or simplex families--we sequenced all coding regions of the genome (the exome) for parent-child trios exhibiting sporadic ASD, including 189 new trios and 20 that were previously reported. Additionally, we also sequenced the exomes of 50 unaffected siblings corresponding to these new (n = 31) and previously reported trios (n = 19), for a total of 677 individual exomes from 209 families. Here we show that de novo point mutations are overwhelmingly paternal in origin (4:1 bias) and positively correlated with paternal age, consistent with the modest increased risk for children of older fathers to develop ASD. Moreover, 39% (49 of 126) of the most severe or disruptive de novo mutations map to a highly interconnected beta-catenin/chromatin remodelling protein network ranked significantly for autism candidate genes. In proband exomes, recurrent protein-altering mutations were observed in two genes: CHD8 and NTNG1. Mutation screening of six candidate genes in 1,703 ASD probands identified additional de novo, protein-altering mutations in GRIN2B, LAMC3 and SCN1A. Combined with copy number variant (CNV) data, these results indicate extreme locus heterogeneity but also provide a target for future discovery, diagnostics and therapeutics.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3350576/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3350576/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉O'Roak, Brian J -- Vives, Laura -- Girirajan, Santhosh -- Karakoc, Emre -- Krumm, Niklas -- Coe, Bradley P -- Levy, Roie -- Ko, Arthur -- Lee, Choli -- Smith, Joshua D -- Turner, Emily H -- Stanaway, Ian B -- Vernot, Benjamin -- Malig, Maika -- Baker, Carl -- Reilly, Beau -- Akey, Joshua M -- Borenstein, Elhanan -- Rieder, Mark J -- Nickerson, Deborah A -- Bernier, Raphael -- Shendure, Jay -- Eichler, Evan E -- HD065285/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HHSN273200800010C/PHS HHS/ -- HL 094976/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL 1029230/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL 102924/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL102926/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD065285/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD065285-02/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL094976/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 HL102923/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- RC2 HL102926/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 4;485(7397):246-50. doi: 10.1038/nature10989.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495309" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Autistic Disorder/*genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Exome/*genetics ; Exons/*genetics ; GPI-Linked Proteins/genetics ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics ; Humans ; Laminin/genetics ; NAV1.1 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics ; Parents ; Point Mutation/*genetics ; Protein Interaction Maps/*genetics ; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Siblings ; Signal Transduction ; Sodium Channels/genetics ; Stochastic Processes ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism ; beta Catenin/metabolism
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-06-19
    Description: Major international projects are underway that are aimed at creating a comprehensive catalogue of all the genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer. These studies involve the sequencing of matched tumour-normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds. The list includes many implausible genes (such as those encoding olfactory receptors and the muscle protein titin), suggesting extensive false-positive findings that overshadow true driver events. We show that this problem stems largely from mutational heterogeneity and provide a novel analytical methodology, MutSigCV, for resolving the problem. We apply MutSigCV to exome sequences from 3,083 tumour-normal pairs and discover extraordinary variation in mutation frequency and spectrum within cancer types, which sheds light on mutational processes and disease aetiology, and in mutation frequency across the genome, which is strongly correlated with DNA replication timing and also with transcriptional activity. By incorporating mutational heterogeneity into the analyses, MutSigCV is able to eliminate most of the apparent artefactual findings and enable the identification of genes truly associated with cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3919509/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3919509/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lawrence, Michael S -- Stojanov, Petar -- Polak, Paz -- Kryukov, Gregory V -- Cibulskis, Kristian -- Sivachenko, Andrey -- Carter, Scott L -- Stewart, Chip -- Mermel, Craig H -- Roberts, Steven A -- Kiezun, Adam -- Hammerman, Peter S -- McKenna, Aaron -- Drier, Yotam -- Zou, Lihua -- Ramos, Alex H -- Pugh, Trevor J -- Stransky, Nicolas -- Helman, Elena -- Kim, Jaegil -- Sougnez, Carrie -- Ambrogio, Lauren -- Nickerson, Elizabeth -- Shefler, Erica -- Cortes, Maria L -- Auclair, Daniel -- Saksena, Gordon -- Voet, Douglas -- Noble, Michael -- DiCara, Daniel -- Lin, Pei -- Lichtenstein, Lee -- Heiman, David I -- Fennell, Timothy -- Imielinski, Marcin -- Hernandez, Bryan -- Hodis, Eran -- Baca, Sylvan -- Dulak, Austin M -- Lohr, Jens -- Landau, Dan-Avi -- Wu, Catherine J -- Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge -- Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo -- Koren, Amnon -- McCarroll, Steven A -- Mora, Jaume -- Lee, Ryan S -- Crompton, Brian -- Onofrio, Robert -- Parkin, Melissa -- Winckler, Wendy -- Ardlie, Kristin -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Roberts, Charles W M -- Biegel, Jaclyn A -- Stegmaier, Kimberly -- Bass, Adam J -- Garraway, Levi A -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Golub, Todd R -- Gordenin, Dmitry A -- Sunyaev, Shamil -- Lander, Eric S -- Getz, Gad -- ES065073/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009172/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009216/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143845/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 11;499(7457):214-8. doi: 10.1038/nature12213. Epub 2013 Jun 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23770567" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Artifacts ; DNA Replication Timing ; Exome/genetics ; False Positive Reactions ; Gene Expression ; *Genetic Heterogeneity ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Mutation Rate ; Neoplasms/classification/*genetics/pathology ; Neoplasms, Squamous Cell/genetics ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Sample Size
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-11-29
    Description: Achieving the goal of malaria elimination will depend on targeting Plasmodium pathways essential across all life stages. Here we identify a lipid kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4-OH kinase (PI(4)K), as the target of imidazopyrazines, a new antimalarial compound class that inhibits the intracellular development of multiple Plasmodium species at each stage of infection in the vertebrate host. Imidazopyrazines demonstrate potent preventive, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking activity in rodent malaria models, are active against blood-stage field isolates of the major human pathogens P. falciparum and P. vivax, and inhibit liver-stage hypnozoites in the simian parasite P. cynomolgi. We show that imidazopyrazines exert their effect through inhibitory interaction with the ATP-binding pocket of PI(4)K, altering the intracellular distribution of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate. Collectively, our data define PI(4)K as a key Plasmodium vulnerability, opening up new avenues of target-based discovery to identify drugs with an ideal activity profile for the prevention, treatment and elimination of malaria.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3940870/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3940870/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McNamara, Case W -- Lee, Marcus C S -- Lim, Chek Shik -- Lim, Siau Hoi -- Roland, Jason -- Nagle, Advait -- Simon, Oliver -- Yeung, Bryan K S -- Chatterjee, Arnab K -- McCormack, Susan L -- Manary, Micah J -- Zeeman, Anne-Marie -- Dechering, Koen J -- Kumar, T R Santha -- Henrich, Philipp P -- Gagaring, Kerstin -- Ibanez, Maureen -- Kato, Nobutaka -- Kuhen, Kelli L -- Fischli, Christoph -- Rottmann, Matthias -- Plouffe, David M -- Bursulaya, Badry -- Meister, Stephan -- Rameh, Lucia -- Trappe, Joerg -- Haasen, Dorothea -- Timmerman, Martijn -- Sauerwein, Robert W -- Suwanarusk, Rossarin -- Russell, Bruce -- Renia, Laurent -- Nosten, Francois -- Tully, David C -- Kocken, Clemens H M -- Glynne, Richard J -- Bodenreider, Christophe -- Fidock, David A -- Diagana, Thierry T -- Winzeler, Elizabeth A -- 078285/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 089275/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 090534/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 096157/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- R01 AI079709/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI085584/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI090141/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI103058/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01079709/PHS HHS/ -- R01085584/PHS HHS/ -- R01AI090141/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- WT078285/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT096157/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 12;504(7479):248-53. doi: 10.1038/nature12782. Epub 2013 Nov 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, San Diego, California 92121, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA [2]. ; Novartis Institutes for Tropical Disease, 138670 Singapore. ; Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, San Diego, California 92121, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Parasitology, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, PO Box 3306, 2280 GH Rijswijk, The Netherlands. ; TropIQ Health Sciences, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ; Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland. ; 1] Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland [2] University of Basel, CH-4003 Basel, Switzerland. ; Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA. ; Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland. ; 1] TropIQ Health Sciences, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands [2] Department of Medical Microbiology, Radboud University, Nijmegen Medical CentrePO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ; Laboratory of Malaria Immunobiology, Singapore Immunology Network, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, 138648 Singapore. ; 1] Laboratory of Malaria Immunobiology, Singapore Immunology Network, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Biopolis, 138648 Singapore [2] Department of Microbiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, 117545 Singapore. ; 1] Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK [2] Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Mae Sot 63110, Thailand. ; 1] Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA [2] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; 1] Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, San Diego, California 92121, USA [2] Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24284631" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: 1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase/*antagonists & ; inhibitors/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Animals ; Binding Sites ; Cytokinesis/drug effects ; Drug Resistance/drug effects/genetics ; Fatty Acids/metabolism ; Female ; Hepatocytes/parasitology ; Humans ; Imidazoles/metabolism/pharmacology ; Life Cycle Stages/drug effects ; Macaca mulatta ; Malaria/*drug therapy/*parasitology ; Male ; Models, Biological ; Models, Molecular ; Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates/metabolism ; Plasmodium/classification/*drug effects/*enzymology/growth & development ; Pyrazoles/metabolism/pharmacology ; Quinoxalines/metabolism/pharmacology ; Reproducibility of Results ; Schizonts/cytology/drug effects ; rab GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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