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  • SURGERY  (9)
  • 1
    Keywords: IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; Germany ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; FOLLOW-UP ; DEATH ; SURGERY ; radiation ; TIME ; PATIENT ; prognosis ; treatment ; MALIGNANCIES ; AGE ; RATES ; chemotherapy ; local control ; ORGANIZATION ; MANAGEMENT ; ONCOLOGY-GROUP ; POSTOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY ; GRADE ; LIFE ; SIZE ; function ; TREATMENT TIME ; soft-tissue sarcoma ; ADJUVANT BRACHYTHERAPY ; electron boost radiation ; external beam radiotherapy ; limb-sparing treatment ; PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL
    Abstract: Purpose: To analyze long-term prognosis and morbidity after limb-sparing treatment of patients with extremity soft-tissue sarcoma, with intraoperative electron boost radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by a moderate dose of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 153 patients who were treated in a single center from 1991 to 2004 were ovaluated. Median IOERT dose was 15 Gy, mean EBRT dose 43 Gy (range, 40-50.4 Gy) in conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy). Median duration of follow-up was 33 months. Acute toxicity was assessed with Common Toxicity Criteria; late toxic effects were scored according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Five-year overall survival and 5-year local control rates were 77% and 78%.. respectively. Whereas tumor size, patient age, and EBRT dose did not significantly affect outcome, resection status and grading were significant for survival; resection status and IOERT dose were significant for local control. Extremity salvage until death or time of follow-up was achieved in 90% of our patients, 86% of whom showed excellent limb function without impairment in activities of daily life. Acute toxicity Grade 2-4 was observed in 23% and late toxicity Grade 2-4 in 17% of patients. Conclusions: Treatment with IOERT combined with moderate doses of external beam irradiation yields high local control and extremity preservation rates in resected extremity soft-tissue sarcoma. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16413697
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  • 2
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; DISEASE ; SURGERY ; PATIENT ; primary ; tumour ; LYMPH-NODES ; SKIN ; treatment ; STAGE ; PROGRESSION ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; RATES ; metastases ; FRANCE ; HEAD ; NECK ; TRABECULAR CARCINOMA ; SERIES ; Merkel cell carcinoma ; RECURRENT ; MANAGEMENT ; SINGLE ; CELL CARCINOMA ; overall survival ; LYMPH-NODE ; ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY ; RARE ; locoregional ; palliative
    Abstract: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare malignant tumour of the skin with a tendency to rapid local progression, frequent spread to regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. We report results with radiotherapy in the treatment of MCC. Thirty-nine patients with histologically proven MCC were treated. Fifteen patients had stage I disease (12 primary, 3 recurrent tumours). Twenty-one patients had stage 11 disease (10 primary, 11 recurrent tumours). Thirty patients were treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Six patients with inoperable disease received radiotherapy alone. Three patients in stage III with distant metastases were treated with palliative radiotherapy. For stage I patients, 3-year locoregional control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 90%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. For stage 11 patients, LC, DSS, and OS were 78%, 55%, and 29%, respectively. LC did not differ significantly between stage I and II patients. But, patients presented to radiotherapy directly after operation showed significantly improved LC compared to patients referred in recurrent situation (p = 0.039). Two of six inoperable patients treated with radiotherapy alone relapsed locally. In the current study, surgery and immediate adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in strong loco-regional control. Radiotherapy alone is suggested only in inoperable or metastatic MCC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17478386
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; carcinoma ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; imaging ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; SITE ; SURGERY ; NUCLEAR-MEDICINE ; PATIENT ; treatment ; FIELD ; TARGET ; PATTERNS ; DECREASE ; chemotherapy ; RECURRENCE ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; RESECTION ; BEAM ; INVOLVEMENT ; local control ; FAILURE ; nuclear medicine ; POSTOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY ; radiology ; ONCOLOGY ; PATTERN ; PREOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY ; ADJUVANT THERAPY ; methods ; NUCLEAR ; USA ; rectal cancer ; EVALUATE ; soft-tissue sarcoma ; MEDICINE ; medical imaging ; in combination ; FIELDS ; LOCAL-CONTROL ; outcome ; REGIMEN ; BEAM RADIATION-THERAPY ; IOERT ; multimodality treatment ; neoadjuvant ; patterns of failure ; RECURRENT COLORECTAL-CANCER ; total mesorectal excision
    Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate local control and patterns of failure in patients treated with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) after total mesorectal excision (TME), to appraise the effectiveness of intraoperative target definition. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the outcome of 243 patients with rectal cancer treated with IOERT (median dose, 10 Gy) after TME. Eighty-eight patients received neoadjuvant and 122 patients adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (median dose, 41.4 Gy), and in 88% simultaneous chemotherapy was applied. Median follow-up was 59 months. Results: Local failure was observed in 17 patients (7%), resulting in a 5-year local control rate of 92%. Only complete resection and absence of nodal involvement correlated positively with local control. Considering IOERT fields, seven infield recurrences were seen in the presacral space, resulting in a 5-year local control rate of 97%. The remaining local relapses were located as follows: retrovesical/retroprostatic (5), anastomotic site (2), promontorium (1), ileocecal (1), and perineal (1). Conclusion: Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy as part of a multimodal treatment approach including TME is a highly effective regimen to prevent local failure. The presacral space remains the site of highest risk for local failure, but IOERT can decrease the percentage of relapses in this area. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17275208
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  • 4
    Keywords: CELLS ; radiotherapy ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; neoplasms ; THERAPY ; TOXICITY ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; TUMORS ; SURGERY ; radiation ; MRI ; PROGRESSION ; CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY ; EXPERIENCE ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; AGE ; EFFICACY ; REGION ; HEAD ; NECK ; local control ; ONCOLOGY ; overall survival ; radiation therapy ; MENINGIOMAS ; BONE ; SCAN ; INSTITUTION ; CASE SERIES
    Abstract: Background: Giant cell tumors are rare neoplasms, representing less than 5% of all bone tumors. The vast majority of giant cell tumors occurs in extremity sites and is treated by surgery alone. However, a small percentage occurs in pelvis, spine or skull bones, where complete resection is challenging. Radiation therapy seems to be an option in these patients, despite the lack of a generally accepted dose or fractionation concept. Here we present a series of five cases treated with high dose IMRT. Patients and Methods: From 2000 and 2006 a total of five patients with histologically proven benign giant cell tumors have been treated with IMRT in our institution. Two patients were male, three female, and median age was 30 years (range 20 - 60). The tumor was located in the sacral region in four and in the sphenoid sinus in one patient. All patients had measurable gross disease prior to radiotherapy with a median size of 9 cm. All patients were treated with IMRT to a median total dose of 64 Gy (range 57.6 Gy to 66 Gy) in conventional fractionation. Results: Median follow up was 46 months ranging from 30 to 107 months. Overall survival was 100%. One patient developed local disease progression three months after radiotherapy and needed extensive surgical salvage. The remaining four patients have been locally controlled, resulting in a local control rate of 80%. We found no substantial tumor shrinkage after radiotherapy but in two patients morphological signs of extensive tumor necrosis were present on MRI scans. Decline of pain and/or neurological symptoms were seen in all four locally controlled patients. The patient who needed surgical salvage showed markedly reduced pain but developed functional deficits of bladder, rectum and lower extremity due to surgery. No severe acute or late toxicities attributable to radiation therapy were observed so far. Conclusion: IMRT is a feasible option in giant cells tumors not amendable to complete surgical removal. In our case series local control was achieved in four out of five patients with marked symptom relief in the majority of cases. No severe toxicity was observed
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20187955
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  • 5
    Keywords: radiotherapy ; SURGERY ; CLINICAL-TRIALS ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; SKULL-BASE ; HEAVY CHARGED-PARTICLES ; BEAMS ; TRACK ; Sacral chordoma ; SACRECTOMY
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Chordomas are relatively rare lesions of the bones. About 30% occur in the sacrococcygeal region. Surgical resection is still the standard treatment. Due to the size, proximity to neurovascular structures and the complex anatomy of the pelvis, a complete resection with adequate safety margin is difficult to perform. A radical resection with safety margins often leads to the loss of bladder and rectal function as well as motoric/sensoric dysfunction. The recurrence rate after surgery alone is comparatively high, such that adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for improving local control rates. Proton therapy is still the international standard in the treatment of chordomas. High-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages in slow-growing tumors. Data of a Japanese study of patients with unresectable sacral chordoma showed comparable high control rates after hypofractionated carbon ion therapy only.Methods and design: This clinical study is a prospective randomized, monocentric phase II trial. Patients with histologically confirmed sacrococcygeal chordoma will be randomized to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy stratified regarding the clinical target volume. Target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. In each arm the PTV will receive 64 GyE in 16 fractions. The primary objective of this trial is safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation in patients with sacrococygeal chordoma using protons or carbon ions in raster scan technique for primary or additive treatment after R2 resection. The evaluation is therefore based on the proportion of treatments without Grade 3-5 toxicity (CTCAE, version 4.0) up to 12 months after treatment and/or discontinuation of the treatment for any reason as primary endpoint. Local-progression free survival, overall survival and quality of life will be analyzed as secondary end points. DISCUSSION: The aim of this study is to confirm the toxicity results of the Japanese data in raster scan technique and to compare it with the toxicity analysis of proton therapy given in the same fractionation. Using this data, a further randomized phase III trial is planned, comparing hypofractionated proton and carbon ion irradiation.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01811394.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24774721
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  • 6
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; SURGERY ; RADIATION-THERAPY ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; adenocarcinoma ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; chemoradiation ; 3D conformal radiotherapy ; NEOADJUVANT CHEMORADIOTHERAPY ; DOSE RADIATION
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). RESULTS: Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to skin, lung and heart were rare. CONCLUSION: IMRT with concurrent systemic therapy in the definitive treatment of esophageal cancer using an integrated boost concept with doses up to 60 Gy is feasible and yields good results with acceptable acute and late overall toxicity and low side effects to skin, lung and heart.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25175056
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURGERY ; IMPACT ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; COMPLICATIONS ; MANAGEMENT ; surgical resection ; MODALITY ; ELECTRON-BEAM RADIOTHERAPY ; MARGIN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: To report an unplanned interim analysis of a prospective, one-armed, single center phase I/II trial (NCT01566123). METHODS: Between 2007 and 2013, 27 patients (pts) with primary/recurrent retroperitoneal sarcomas (size 〉 5 cm, M0, at least marginally resectable) were enrolled. The protocol attempted neoadjuvant IMRT using an integrated boost with doses of 45-50 Gy to PTV and 50-56 Gy to GTV in 25 fractions, followed by surgery and IOERT (10-12 Gy). Primary endpoint was 5-year-LC, secondary endpoints included PFS, OS, resectability, and acute/late toxicity. The majority of patients showed high grade lesions (FNCLCC G1:18%, G2:52%, G3:30%), predominantly liposarcomas (70%). Median tumor size was 15 cm (6-31). RESULTS: Median follow-up was 33 months (5-75). Neoadjuvant IMRT was performed as planned (median dose 50 Gy, 26-55) in all except 2 pts (93%). Gross total resection was feasible in all except one patient. Final margin status was R0 in 6 (22%) and R1 in 20 pts (74%). Contiguous-organ resection was needed in all grossly resected patients. IOERT was performed in 23 pts (85%) with a median dose of 12 Gy (10-20 Gy).We observed 7 local recurrences, transferring into estimated 3- and 5-year-LC rates of 72%. Two were located outside the EBRT area and two were observed after more than 5 years. Locally recurrent situation had a significantly negative impact on local control. Distant failure was found in 8 pts, resulting in 3- and 5-year-DC rates of 63%. Patients with leiomyosarcoma had a significantly increased risk of distant failure. Estimated 3- and 5-year-rates were 40% for PFS and 74% for OS. Severe acute toxicity (grade 3) was present in 4 pts (15%). Severe postoperative complications were found in 9 pts (33%), of whom 2 finally died after multiple re-interventions. Severe late toxicity (grade 3) was scored in 6% of surviving patients after 1 year and none after 2 years. CONCLUSION: Combination of neoadjuvant IMRT, surgery and IOERT is feasible with acceptable toxicity and yields good results in terms of LC and OS in patients with high-risk retroperitoneal sarcomas. Long term follow-up seems mandatory given the observation of late recurrences. Accrual of patients will be continued with extended follow-up. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01566123.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25163595
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  • 8
    Keywords: IRRADIATION ; radiotherapy ; SURGERY ; IMPACT ; TOLERANCE ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; SOFT-TISSUE SARCOMAS ; IMRT ; MANAGEMENT ; EXTREMITY
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: To report our results with postoperative or definitive radiation therapy in head and neck sarcomas. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 26 patients suffering from head and neck sarcomas, who received postoperative or definitive radiation therapy between 2003 and 2012. Median age was 64 years (19-88) and 69 % were male. Tumor locations were skull (including skin) in 31 %, paranasal sinus/orbita in 27 % and neck (including pharynx/larynx) in 42 %. Median tumor size was 4.6 cm (1-12 cm). 22 patients (85 %) presented in primary situation. Stage at presentation (UICC 7(th) for soft tissue sarcomas) was as follows: Ia:4 %, IIa:50 %, IIb:15 %, III:31 %. All except one patient suffered from high grade lesions (G2/3 FNCLCC), predominantly angiosarcoma (35 %), MFH (19 %) and synovial sarcoma (15 %). Surgery was performed in 21 pts (81 %), resulting in free margins in 10 (38 %), microscopically positive margins in 6 (23 %) and gross residual disease in 5 (19 %). Median dose to the primary tumor region was 66Gy (45-72Gy) in conventional fractionation, using 3D-CRT in 65 %, IMRT in 27 % and electrons in 8 %. 50 % of the patients also received sequential chemotherapy. RESULTS: Median follow up was 39 months (8-136). We observed three local recurrences, transferring into estimated 3- and 5-year local control rates of 86 %. One additional patient failed distantly, resulting in 3- and 5-year freedom from treatment failure rates of 82 %. Four patients have deceased, transferring into 3- and 5-year overall survival rates of 88 % and 82 %, respectively. Only two of the four deaths were sarcoma related. Maximum acute toxicity (CTCAE 3.0) was grade 1 in 27 % of the patients, grade 2 in 50 % and grade 3 in 23 %. Severe acute toxicity was mainly represented by mucositis and dysphagia. Maximum late toxicity was grade 1 in 31 %, grade 2 in 15 % and grade 3 in 19 % of the patients. Severe late toxicity included skin ulceration (n = 1), dysphagia with persistent tube dependency (n = 1), persistent sinusitis (n = 1) and hearing loss (n = 2). CONCLUSION: Excellent local control and overall survival rates can be achieved with postoperative or definitive radiation therapy with acceptable acute and late toxicities in patients suffering from sarcomas of the head and neck region.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26156022
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  • 9
    Keywords: IRRADIATION ; carcinoma ; SURGERY ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; surgical resection ; total mesorectal excision ; CHEMORADIOTHERAPY ; CONTAINING MULTIMODALITY TREATMENT ; BOOST RADIOTHERAPY ; PELVIC RECURRENCE
    Abstract: Background: To evaluate disease control, overall survival and prognostic factors in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer after IOERT-containing multimodal therapy. Methods: Between 1991 and 2006, 97 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer have been treated with surgery and IOERT. IOERT was preceded or followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in 54 previously untreated patients (median dose 41.4 Gy) usually combined with 5-Fluouracil-based chemotherapy (89%). IOERT was delivered via cylindric cones with doses of 10-20 Gy. Adjuvant CHT was given only in a minority of patients (34%). Median follow-up was 51 months. Results: Margin status was R0 in 37%, R1 in 33% and R2 in 30% of the patients. Neoadjuvant EBRT resulted in significantly increased rates of free margins (52% vs. 24%). Median overall survival was 39 months. Estimated 5-year rates for central control (inside the IOERT area), local control (inside the pelvis), distant control and overall survival were 54%, 41%, 40% and 30%. Resection margin was the strongest prognostic factor for overall survival (3-year OS of 80% (R0), 37% (R1), 35% (R2)) and LC (3-year LC 82% (R0), 41% (R1), 18% (R2)) in the multivariate model. OS was further significantly affected by clinical stage at first diagnosis and achievement of local control after treatment in the univariate model. Distant failures were found in 46 patients, predominantly in the lung. 90-day postoperative mortality was 3.1%. Conclusion: Long term OS and LC can be achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with recurrent rectal cancer using a multimodality IOERT-containing approach, especially in case of clear margins. LC and OS remain limited in patients with incomplete resection. Preoperative re-irradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered to improve outcome.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23231663
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