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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELL ; Germany ; LUNG ; neoplasms ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; DISEASE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; renal ; SKIN ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; genetics ; etiology ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; leukemia ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; ATTRIBUTABLE RISKS ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; NONPOLYPOSIS COLORECTAL-CANCER ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; GUIDELINES ; familial cancers,heritable cancer,clinical counseling,familial risk ; GENOMIC MEDICINE ; HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; TESTICULAR CANCER
    Abstract: Familial risks for cancer are important for clinical counseling and understanding cancer etiology. Medically verified data on familial risks have not been available for all types of cancer. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0-to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (Cl) were calculated for age-specific familial risk in offspring by an exact proband status. The familial risks for offspring cancer were increased at 24/25 sites from concordant cancer in only the parent, at 20/21 sites from a sibling proband and at 12/12 sites from a parent and sibling proband. The highest SIRs by parent were for Hodgkin's disease (4.88) and testicular (4.26), non-medullary thyroid (3.26), ovarian (3.15) and esophageal (3.14) cancer and for multiple myeloma (3.33). When a sibling was affected, even prostate, renal, squamous cell skin, endocrine, gastric and lung cancer and leukemia showed SIRs in excess of 3.00. The highest cumulative risks were found for familial breast (5.5%) and prostate (4.2%) cancers. We identified reliable familial risks for 24 common neoplasms, most of which lack guidelines for clinical counseling or action level. If, for example, a familial SIR of 2.2 would be use as an action level, counseling would be needed for most cancers at some diagnostic age groups. The present data provide the basis for clinical counseling. (C) 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14618624
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENES ; PATIENT ; kidney ; FAMILY ; MEMBER ; MEMBERS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; etiology ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; familial risk ; NATIONWIDE ; FAMILY-CANCER DATABASE ; GUIDELINES ; GENOMIC MEDICINE ; TESTICULAR CANCER ; CELL TUMORS ; familial cancers,heritable cancer,clinical counseling,urology ; LINDAU-DISEASE
    Abstract: Familial risks for cancer are important for clinical counseling and understanding cancer etiology. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later (0 to 68-year-old offspring) with their parents, totaling over 10.2 million individuals. Urological cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) were calculated for age-specific familial risk in offspring by an exact proband status. The familial risks for offspring cancer were increased at all urological sites from concordant cancer in the parent and in a sibling proband. The highest SIRs by parent were for testicular and prostate cancer (4.26 and 2.45). When a sibling was affected, even kidney cancer (4.74) showed a high SIR. For kidney cancers, and also for prostate and testicular cancers, the SIRs were higher among siblings than among offspring and parents, which may indicate the involvement of recessive effects. Family members of patients with prostate cancer or von Hippel Lindau disease can expect organized clinical counseling, but family members of patients with other urological cancers are probably not counseled. Guidelines for clinical counseling or action level should be developed for all urological cancers because of the established familial risks. Urological cancers also offer a challenge to molecular geneticists attempting to identify the susceptibility genes underlying the familial clustering
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14615900
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; genetics ; familial risk ; USA ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; Genetic ; 33 ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Genome-wide association studies
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, but these explain only a small fraction of the familial risk of the disease. Five of these loci were identified through a two-stage GWAS involving 390 familial cases and 364 controls in the first stage, and 3,990 cases and 3,916 controls in the second stage(1). To identify additional loci, we tested over 800 promising associations from this GWAS in a further two stages involving 37,012 cases and 40,069 controls from 33 studies in the CGEMS collaboration and Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We found strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08-1.13, P = 4.1 x 10(-23)) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92-0.97, P = 1.4 x 10(-8)). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19330027
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  • 4
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; CELL ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; DIFFERENTIATION ; TUMORS ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; MARKER ; REDUCTION ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; BRCA1 ; WOMEN ; MUTATION ; SNP ; MARKERS ; cancer risk ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; PROGENITOR CELLS ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; PROJECT ; MORPHOGENESIS ; ER ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; SINGLE ; case control study ; case-control study ; BRCA2 ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR ; VARIANT ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; ESTROGEN ; biomarker ; estrogen receptor ; pooled analysis ; USA ; CANCER-RISK ; CONSORTIUM ; tumor suppressor ; 3 ; Genetic ; TRANSCRIPTION-FACTOR ; BRCA1 and BRCA2 ; GATA3 ; LUMINAL CELL FATE
    Abstract: GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) is a transcription factor that is crucial to mammary gland morphogenesis and differentiation of progenitor cells, and has been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function. The rs570613 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in intron 4 of GATA3 was previously found to be associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project and in pooled analysis of two case-control studies from Norway and Poland (P (trend) = 0.004), with some evidence for a stronger association with estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours [Garcia-Closas M et al. (2007) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 16:2269-2275]. We genotyped GATA3 rs570613 in 6,388 cases and 4,995 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and 5,617 BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). We found no association between this SNP and breast cancer risk in BCAC cases overall (ORper-allele = 1.00, 95% CI 0.94-1.05), in ER negative BCAC cases (ORper-allele = 1.02, 95% CI 0.91-1.13), in BRCA1 mutation carriers RRper-allele = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90-1.09) or BRCA2 mutation carriers (RRper-allele = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80-1.07). We conclude that there is no evidence that either GATA3 rs570613, or any variant in strong linkage disequilibrium with it, is associated with breast cancer risk in women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19082709
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  • 5
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; GENE ; prognosis ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANT ; CHEK2 ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; TUMOR CHARACTERISTICS ; GERMLINE MUTATION
    Abstract: PURPOSE We tested the hypotheses that CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity is associated with increased risk of early death, breast cancer-specific death, and risk of a second breast cancer in women with a first breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS From 22 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, 25,571 white women with invasive breast cancer were genotyped for CHEK2*1100delC and observed for up to 20 years (median, 6.6 years). We examined risk of early death and breast cancer-specific death by estrogen receptor status and risk of a second breast cancer after a first breast cancer in prospective studies. Results CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was found in 459 patients (1.8%). In women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for heterozygotes versus noncarriers were 1.43 (95% CI, 1.12 to 1.82; log-rank P = .004) for early death and 1.63 (95% CI, 1.24 to 2.15; log-rank P 〈 .001) for breast cancer-specific death. In all women, hazard ratio for a second breast cancer was 2.77 (95% CI, 2.00 to 3.83; log-rank P 〈 .001) increasing to 3.52 (95% CI, 2.35 to 5.27; log-rank P 〈 .001) in women with estrogen receptor-positive first breast cancer only. CONCLUSION Among women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, CHEK2*1100delC heterozygosity was associated with a 1.4-fold risk of early death, a 1.6-fold risk of breast cancer-specific death, and a 3.5-fold risk of a second breast cancer. This is one of the few examples of a genetic factor that influences long-term prognosis being documented in an extensive series of women with breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23109706
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  • 6
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; LUNG-CANCER ; prognosis ; CELL-LINES ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; OUTCOMES ; REVEALS ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; LARGE GENE LISTS
    Abstract: We have utilized a two-stage study design to search for SNPs associated with the survival of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Our initial GWS data set consisted of 805 Finnish breast cancer cases (360 treated with adjuvant chemotherapy). The top 39 SNPs from this stage were analyzed in three independent data sets: iCOGS (n=6720 chemotherapy-treated cases), SUCCESS-A (n=3596), and POSH (n=518). Two SNPs were successfully validated: rs6500843 (any chemotherapy; per-allele HR 1.16, 95% C.I. 1.08-1.26, p=0.0001, p(adjusted)=0.0091), and rs11155012 (anthracycline therapy; per-allele HR 1.21, 95% C.I. 1.08-1.35, p=0.0010, p(adjusted)=0.0270). The SNP rs6500843 was found to specifically interact with adjuvant chemotherapy, independently of standard prognostic markers (p(interaction)=0.0009), with the rs6500843-GG genotype corresponding to the highest hazard among chemotherapy-treated cases (HR 1.47, 95% C.I. 1.20-1.80). Upon trans-eQTL analysis of public microarray data, the rs6500843 locus was found to associate with the expression of a group of genes involved in cell cycle control, notably AURKA, the expression of which also exhibited differential prognostic value between chemotherapy-treated and untreated cases in our analysis of microarray data. Based on previously published information, we propose that the eQTL genes may be connected to the rs6500843 locus via a RBFOX1-FOXM1 -mediated regulatory pathway.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25823661
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; neoplasms ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; FAMILY ; tumour ; SKIN ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; IN-SITU ; MELANOMA ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; SIR ; CUTANEOUS MELANOMA ; Bowen's disease ; in situ carcinoma ; multiple skin cancer ; multiple skin cancers ; NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION-REPAIR ; OCULAR MELANOMA ; PRIMARY CANCERS
    Abstract: We used the updated nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to examine familial risks in data from 1961 to 1998 on 1252 invasive and 2474 in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin among offspring, and over 10 times more among parents. In 259 families a parent and an offspring had skin SCC. The familial standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were 2.72 for invasive and 2.40 for in situ skin cancers in offspring. Multiple skin cancers in parents were associated with increased SIRs for invasive SCC in offspring, being 2.55 for one and up to 14.93 for two invasive and two in situ cancers in parents; the corresponding in situ SCC risks were 2.28 and 7.49. The population attributable fraction for any familial skin SCC, invasive or in situ, was 4.1%. Melanoma was the only discordant tumour that was associated with invasive and in situ skin SCC. These results provide evidence that there is an underlying hereditary susceptibility for at least a part of the familial clustering for skin SCC. (C) 2003 Cancer Research UK
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12778064
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; DIAGNOSIS ; INFORMATION ; DEATH ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; microarray ; TUMORS ; validation ; DNA ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; ASSAY ; microarrays ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; meta-analysis ; SNP ; risk factors ; mass spectrometry ; SPECTROMETRY ; RISK FACTOR ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; overall survival ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTOR ; METAANALYSIS ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; GENOTYPE ; cancer survival ; INTERNATIONAL CASE-CONTROL ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; REPAIR GENES ; TUMOR CHARACTERISTICS ; COMMON POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide ; journals ; COX REGRESSION ; ALL-CAUSE ; BRCA1 MUTATIONS
    Abstract: Traditional prognostic factors for survival and treatment response of patients with breast cancer do not fully account for observed survival variation. We used available genotype data from a previously conducted two-stage, breast cancer susceptibility genome-wide association study (ie, Studies of Epidemiology and Risk factors in Cancer Heredity [SEARCH]) to investigate associations between variation in germline DNA and overall survival. We evaluated possible associations between overall survival after a breast cancer diagnosis and 10 621 germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from up to 3761 patients with invasive breast cancer (including 647 deaths and 26 978 person-years at risk) that were genotyped previously in the SEARCH study with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (ie, hypothesis-generating set). Associations with all-cause mortality were assessed for each SNP by use of Cox regression analysis, generating a per rare allele hazard ratio (HR). To validate putative associations, we used patient genotype information that had been obtained with 5' nuclease assay or mass spectrometry and overall survival information for up to 14 096 patients with invasive breast cancer (including 2303 deaths and 70 019 person-years at risk) from 15 international case-control studies (ie, validation set). Fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to generate an overall effect estimate in the validation dataset and in combined SEARCH and validation datasets. All statistical tests were two-sided. In the hypothesis-generating dataset, SNP rs4778137 (C 〉 G) of the OCA2 gene at 15q13.1 was statistically significantly associated with overall survival among patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors, with the rare G allele being associated with increased overall survival (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.41 to 0.75, P = 9.2 x 10(-5)). This association was also observed in the validation dataset (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.99, P = .03) and in the combined dataset (HR of death per rare allele carried = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.92, P = 5 x 10(-4)). The rare G allele of the OCA2 polymorphism, rs4778137, may be associated with improved overall survival among patients with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20308648
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; RISK ; GENE ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; breast cancer ; PATTERNS ; risk factors ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; ALLELES ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; PROGESTERONE-RECEPTOR ; BRCA2 MUTATION CARRIERS ; Risk prediction
    Abstract: Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations with ER+ than ER- tumors for six of the eight loci identified in GWAS: rs2981582 (10q26) (P-heterogeneity = 6.1 x 10(-18)), rs3803662 (16q12) (P = 3.7 x 10(-5)), rs13281615 (8q24) (P = 0.002), rs13387042 (2q35) (P = 0.006), rs4973768 (3p24) (P = 0.003) and rs6504950 (17q23) (P = 0.002). The two candidate loci, CASP8 (rs1045485, rs17468277) and TGFB1 (rs1982073), were most strongly related with the risk of PR negative tumors (P = 5.1 x 10(-6) and P = 4.1 x 10(-4), respectively), as previously suggested. Four of the eight loci identified in GWAS were associated with triple negative tumors (P 〈= 0.016): rs3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P 〈= 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor stratification might help in the identification and characterization of novel risk factors for breast cancer subtypes. This may eventually result in further improvements in prevention, early detection and treatment
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21596841
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  • 10
    Keywords: GENE ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; WOMEN ; ESTROGEN ; ATM
    Abstract: Background Using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, the authors previously reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism 7q21-rs6964587 (AKAP9-M463I) is associated with breast cancer risk. The authors have now assessed this association more comprehensively using 16 independent case-control studies. Methods The authors genotyped 14 843 invasive case patients and 19 852 control subjects with white European ancestry and 2595 invasive case patients and 2192 control subjects with Asian ancestry. ORs were estimated by logistic regression, adjusted for study. Heterogeneity in ORs was assessed by fitting interaction terms or by subclassifying case patients and applying polytomous logistic regression. Results For white European women, the minor T allele of 7q21-rs6964587 was associated with breast cancer risk under a recessive model (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.13, p=0.04). Results were inconclusive for Asian women. From a combined analysis of 24 154 case patients and 33 376 control subjects of white European ancestry from the present and previous series, the best-fitting model was recessive, with an estimated OR of 1.08 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.13, p=0.001). The OR was greater at younger ages (p trend=0.01). Conclusion This may be the first common susceptibility allele for breast cancer to be identified with a recessive mode of inheritance
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21931171
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