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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2015-06-02
    Description: Understanding the diversity of human tissues is fundamental to disease and requires linking genetic information, which is identical in most of an individual's cells, with epigenetic mechanisms that could have tissue-specific roles. Surveys of DNA methylation in human tissues have established a complex landscape including both tissue-specific and invariant methylation patterns. Here we report high coverage methylomes that catalogue cytosine methylation in all contexts for the major human organ systems, integrated with matched transcriptomes and genomic sequence. By combining these diverse data types with each individuals' phased genome, we identified widespread tissue-specific differential CG methylation (mCG), partially methylated domains, allele-specific methylation and transcription, and the unexpected presence of non-CG methylation (mCH) in almost all human tissues. mCH correlated with tissue-specific functions, and using this mark, we made novel predictions of genes that escape X-chromosome inactivation in specific tissues. Overall, DNA methylation in several genomic contexts varies substantially among human tissues.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499021/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499021/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schultz, Matthew D -- He, Yupeng -- Whitaker, John W -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Mukamel, Eran A -- Leung, Danny -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Nery, Joseph R -- Urich, Mark A -- Chen, Huaming -- Lin, Shin -- Lin, Yiing -- Jung, Inkyung -- Schmitt, Anthony D -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Ren, Bing -- Sejnowski, Terrence J -- Wang, Wei -- Ecker, Joseph R -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R00 NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R00NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 9;523(7559):212-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14465. Epub 2015 Jun 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Bioinformatics Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, M-344 Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8109, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Bioinformatics Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26030523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Alleles ; Chromosome Mapping ; *DNA Methylation ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genetic Variation ; Humans ; Male ; Organ Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2010-12-18
    Description: Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor of children. To identify the genetic alterations in this tumor type, we searched for copy number alterations using high-density microarrays and sequenced all known protein-coding genes and microRNA genes using Sanger sequencing in a set of 22 MBs. We found that, on average, each tumor had 11 gene alterations, fewer by a factor of 5 to 10 than in the adult solid tumors that have been sequenced to date. In addition to alterations in the Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, our analysis led to the discovery of genes not previously known to be altered in MBs. Most notably, inactivating mutations of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase genes MLL2 or MLL3 were identified in 16% of MB patients. These results demonstrate key differences between the genetic landscapes of adult and childhood cancers, highlight dysregulation of developmental pathways as an important mechanism underlying MBs, and identify a role for a specific type of histone methylation in human tumorigenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3110744/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3110744/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Parsons, D Williams -- Li, Meng -- Zhang, Xiaosong -- Jones, Sian -- Leary, Rebecca J -- Lin, Jimmy Cheng-Ho -- Boca, Simina M -- Carter, Hannah -- Samayoa, Josue -- Bettegowda, Chetan -- Gallia, Gary L -- Jallo, George I -- Binder, Zev A -- Nikolsky, Yuri -- Hartigan, James -- Smith, Doug R -- Gerhard, Daniela S -- Fults, Daniel W -- VandenBerg, Scott -- Berger, Mitchel S -- Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi -- Shinjo, Sueli Mieko Oba -- Clara, Carlos -- Phillips, Peter C -- Minturn, Jane E -- Biegel, Jaclyn A -- Judkins, Alexander R -- Resnick, Adam C -- Storm, Phillip B -- Curran, Tom -- He, Yiping -- Rasheed, B Ahmed -- Friedman, Henry S -- Keir, Stephen T -- McLendon, Roger -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Burger, Peter C -- Riggins, Gregory J -- Karchin, Rachel -- Parmigiani, Giovanni -- Bigner, Darell D -- Yan, Hai -- Papadopoulos, Nick -- Vogelstein, Bert -- Kinzler, Kenneth W -- Velculescu, Victor E -- CA057345/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA096832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA118822/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA121113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA135877/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM074906-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HHSN261200800001E/PHS HHS/ -- P01 CA096832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA096832-03/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA108622/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA057345/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA057345-20/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 28;331(6016):435-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1198056. Epub 2010 Dec 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21163964" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Cerebellar Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism ; Child ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; *Genes, Neoplasm ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics/metabolism ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/*genetics/metabolism ; Methylation ; MicroRNAs/genetics ; *Mutation ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Point Mutation ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-09-21
    Description: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Guofan -- Fang, Xiaodong -- Guo, Ximing -- Li, Li -- Luo, Ruibang -- Xu, Fei -- Yang, Pengcheng -- Zhang, Linlin -- Wang, Xiaotong -- Qi, Haigang -- Xiong, Zhiqiang -- Que, Huayong -- Xie, Yinlong -- Holland, Peter W H -- Paps, Jordi -- Zhu, Yabing -- Wu, Fucun -- Chen, Yuanxin -- Wang, Jiafeng -- Peng, Chunfang -- Meng, Jie -- Yang, Lan -- Liu, Jun -- Wen, Bo -- Zhang, Na -- Huang, Zhiyong -- Zhu, Qihui -- Feng, Yue -- Mount, Andrew -- Hedgecock, Dennis -- Xu, Zhe -- Liu, Yunjie -- Domazet-Loso, Tomislav -- Du, Yishuai -- Sun, Xiaoqing -- Zhang, Shoudu -- Liu, Binghang -- Cheng, Peizhou -- Jiang, Xuanting -- Li, Juan -- Fan, Dingding -- Wang, Wei -- Fu, Wenjing -- Wang, Tong -- Wang, Bo -- Zhang, Jibiao -- Peng, Zhiyu -- Li, Yingxiang -- Li, Na -- Wang, Jinpeng -- Chen, Maoshan -- He, Yan -- Tan, Fengji -- Song, Xiaorui -- Zheng, Qiumei -- Huang, Ronglian -- Yang, Hailong -- Du, Xuedi -- Chen, Li -- Yang, Mei -- Gaffney, Patrick M -- Wang, Shan -- Luo, Longhai -- She, Zhicai -- Ming, Yao -- Huang, Wen -- Zhang, Shu -- Huang, Baoyu -- Zhang, Yong -- Qu, Tao -- Ni, Peixiang -- Miao, Guoying -- Wang, Junyi -- Wang, Qiang -- Steinberg, Christian E W -- Wang, Haiyan -- Li, Ning -- Qian, Lumin -- Zhang, Guojie -- Li, Yingrui -- Yang, Huanming -- Liu, Xiao -- Wang, Jian -- Yin, Ye -- Wang, Jun -- 268513/European Research Council/International -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):49-54. doi: 10.1038/nature11413. Epub 2012 Sep 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22992520" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological/*genetics ; Animal Shells/chemistry/*growth & development ; Animals ; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics ; Crassostrea/*genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genomics ; HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Larva/genetics/growth & development ; Mass Spectrometry ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics ; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Stress, Physiological/genetics/*physiology ; Transcriptome/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-05-07
    Description: Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is a dynamic process in both space and time, it seems counterintuitive that these two temporal states represent the full spectrum of organismal pluripotency. Here we show that by modulating culture parameters, a stem-cell type with unique spatial characteristics and distinct molecular and functional features, designated as region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs), can be efficiently obtained from mouse embryos and primate pluripotent stem cells, including humans. The ease of culturing and editing the genome of human rsPSCs offers advantages for regenerative medicine applications. The unique ability of human rsPSCs to generate post-implantation interspecies chimaeric embryos may facilitate our understanding of early human development and evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Jun -- Okamura, Daiji -- Li, Mo -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Luo, Chongyuan -- Ma, Li -- He, Yupeng -- Li, Zhongwei -- Benner, Chris -- Tamura, Isao -- Krause, Marie N -- Nery, Joseph R -- Du, Tingting -- Zhang, Zhuzhu -- Hishida, Tomoaki -- Takahashi, Yuta -- Aizawa, Emi -- Kim, Na Young -- Lajara, Jeronimo -- Guillen, Pedro -- Campistol, Josep M -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Ross, Pablo J -- Saghatelian, Alan -- Ren, Bing -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 21;521(7552):316-21. doi: 10.1038/nature14413. Epub 2015 May 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Integrated Genomics, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA. ; 1] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Life Science Center, Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan. ; Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain. ; 1] Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain [2] Fundacion Pedro Guillen, Clinica Cemtro, Avenida Ventisquero de la Condesa, 42, 28035 Madrid, Spain. ; Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Carrer Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. ; University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Peptide Biology Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945737" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Culture Techniques/methods ; Cell Line ; *Chimera ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology ; Female ; Germ Layers/cytology ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology ; Male ; Mice ; Pan troglodytes ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Regenerative Medicine ; Species Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a approximately 20 degrees rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Yanyong -- Zhou, X Edward -- Gao, Xiang -- He, Yuanzheng -- Liu, Wei -- Ishchenko, Andrii -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Han, Gye Won -- Xu, Qingping -- de Waal, Parker W -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Moeller, Arne -- West, Graham M -- Pascal, Bruce D -- Van Eps, Ned -- Caro, Lydia N -- Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A -- Lee, Regina J -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- Gu, Xin -- Pal, Kuntal -- Ma, Jinming -- Zhi, Xiaoyong -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Gati, Cornelius -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Basu, Shibom -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Coe, Jesse -- Liu, Haiguang -- Lisova, Stella -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Jiang, Yi -- Tan, Minjia -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Li, Jun -- Wang, Meitian -- Zheng, Zhong -- Li, Dianfan -- Howe, Nicole -- Zhao, Yingming -- Standfuss, Jorg -- Diederichs, Kay -- Dong, Yuhui -- Potter, Clinton S -- Carragher, Bridget -- Caffrey, Martin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Ernst, Oliver P -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Gurevich, Vsevolod V -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- EY005216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM077561/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM097463/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM104212/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM108635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30EY000331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK066202/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM087413/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109955/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):561-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14656. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Joint Center for Structural Genomics, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; The National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Haidian District, Beijing 10084, China. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; School of Medicine and School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA [2] Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Laboratory of Biomolecular Research at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biology, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. ; Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. ; 1] Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [2] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 2F Building 6, 99 Haike Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 201210, China. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200343" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arrestin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lasers ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Reproducibility of Results ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-11-26
    Description: Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3584687/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3584687/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Soon, Fen-Fen -- Ng, Ley-Moy -- Zhou, X Edward -- West, Graham M -- Kovach, Amanda -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- He, Yuanzheng -- Xu, Yong -- Chalmers, Michael J -- Brunzelle, Joseph S -- Zhang, Huiming -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Li, Jun -- Yong, Eu-Leong -- Cutler, Sean -- Zhu, Jian-Kang -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM059138/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jan 6;335(6064):85-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1215106. Epub 2011 Nov 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22116026" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Abscisic Acid/chemistry/*metabolism ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Arabidopsis/chemistry/*metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Catalytic Domain ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Enzyme Activation ; Models, Molecular ; *Molecular Mimicry ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Binding ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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