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  • TISSUE  (7)
  • 1
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; SYSTEM ; DISTINCT ; PROTEIN ; EPITHELIA ; MOLECULES ; TISSUE ; TISSUES ; SKIN ; GLYCOPROTEIN ; ELEMENTS ; SURFACE ; LOCALIZATION ; GLANDS ; SEGMENTS ; calnexin ; ESTABLISHMENT ; MUCINS ; salivary gland ; sebaceous gland ; SEBACEOUS GLANDS
    Abstract: Calnexin (Cnx) has been characterized as a membrane-bound protein that transiently interacts in a unique chaperone system with newly synthesized glycoproteins in order to allow the establishment of their proper tertiary and, in most cases, quarternary structures. The aim of the study was to identify and to locate the expression of Cnx in the three major salivary glands of humans by different methods. Strong expression of Cnx protein and mRNA were generally found in serous salivary secretory units. With regard to mucous secretory units, expression of Cnx was only detectable at a low level in mucous acinar cells of sublingual glands, but not of submandibular glands. Expression of Cnx was always preserved in the surface epithelium of intralobar and interlobular duct segments. In addition, expression of Cnx was detected in sebaceous glands of parotid tissues, with a distribution pattern resembling that seen in sebaceous glands of the normal skin. In conclusion, production of saliva is associated with the expression of Cnx. Synthesis of molecules in mucous secretory units is not necessarily associated with a strong Cnx expression, whereas synthesis in serous secretory units apparently is. The tissue- specific Cnx expression is also paralleled by the observation that the secretions produced by the major salivary glands differ in their composition and amount
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12507291
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  • 2
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; INHIBITOR ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; INHIBITION ; THERAPY ; LUNG-CANCER ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TISSUE ; kidney ; FAMILY ; tumour ; ALPHA ; TARGET ; ISOFORM ; immunohistochemistry ; DIFFERENCE ; resistance ; CANCER-CELLS ; BETA ; STRATEGIES ; IMMUNOTHERAPY ; NORMAL TISSUE ; sensitivity ; OVEREXPRESSION ; CANCER-THERAPY ; protein expression ; TRANSCRIPTS ; CELL CARCINOMA ; renal cell carcinoma ; ONCOLOGY ; ADULT ; RE ; THERAPIES ; INCREASE ; cancer therapy ; REAL-TIME ; SURVIVIN ; NUCLEAR ; ML-IAP ; inhibitor of apoptosis ; apoptotic ; quantitative ; livin/ML-IAP ; APOPTOSIS PROTEIN ; CYTOPLASM ; tumour therapy ; Livin/ML-IAP/KIAP ; MELANOMA INHIBITOR
    Abstract: The antiapoptotic Livin/ML-IAP gene has recently gained much attention as a potential new target for cancer therapy. Reports indicating that livin is expressed almost exclusively in tumours, but not in the corresponding normal tissue, suggested that the targeted inhibition of livin may present a novel tumour-specific therapeutic strategy. Here, we compared the expression of livin in renal cell carcinoma and in non-tumorous adult kidney tissue by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. We found that livin expression was significantly increased in tumours (P=0.0077), but was also clearly detectable in non-tumorous adult kidney. Transcripts encoding Livin isoforms alpha and beta were found in both renal cell carcinoma and normal tissue, without obvious qualitative differences. Livin protein in renal cell carcinoma samples exhibited cytoplasmic and/or nuclear staining. In non-tumorous kidney tissue, Livin protein expression was only detectable in specific cell types and restricted to the cytoplasm. Thus, whereas the relative overexpression of livin in renal cell carcinoma indicates that it may still represent a therapeutic target to increase the apoptotic sensitivity of kidney cancer cells, this strategy is likely to be not tumour-specific
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17968430
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  • 3
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; METABOLISM ; EPITHELIA ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; TISSUES ; SEQUENCE ; ACID ; ACIDS ; antibodies ; antibody ; ADENOMAS ; SURFACE ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; fatty acids ; FATTY-ACIDS ; adenocarcinoma ; ADENOCARCINOMAS ; carcinoma,epithelial tumors,fatty acid metabolism,small intestine ; CHAIN ACYL-COA ; DEPENDENT REGULATION ; fatty acid metabolism ; SMALL-INTESTINE
    Abstract: Fatty acids are implicated in tumorigenesis, but data are limited concerning endogenous fatty acid metabolism of tumor cells in adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. The recently cloned human acyl-CoA-synthetase 5 (ACS5) is predominantly found in the small intestine and represents a key enzyme in providing cytosolic acyl-CoA thioesters. Protein synthesis and mRNA expression of ACS5 were studied in human intestinal tissues using different methods, including a newly established monoclonal antibody. In the healthy small intestine, expression of ACS5 was restricted to the villus surface epithelium but was not detectable in enterocytes lining crypts. ACS5 protein and mRNA were progressively diminished in epithelial cells of adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the small intestine. In conclusion, altered expression of ACS5 is probably related to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence of small intestinal epithelial tumors due to an impaired acyl-CoA thioester synthesis. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14608540
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  • 4
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; DIAGNOSIS ; screening ; DISEASE ; PROTEIN ; DIFFERENTIATION ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY ; TISSUE ; MECHANISM ; TISSUES ; mechanisms ; antibodies ; antibody ; IDENTIFICATION ; DECREASE ; PATHOGENESIS ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; PHENOTYPE ; PROTEIN LEVELS ; CROHNS-DISEASE ; MUCOSA ; INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE ; COLITIS ; ACS5,fatty acid metabolism,human,small intestine ; FATTY-ACID PATTERN ; GASTRIC METAPLASIA ; PYLORIC METAPLASIA ; TRIACSIN-C
    Abstract: Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology. Screening of antibodies from a hybridoma library led to the identification of an acyl-CoA synthetase 5-specific monoclonal antibody. Protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and the enzyme activity of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 were studied by several methods in human small intestinal tissues with Crohn's disease or coeliac disease, respectively. Acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mRNA and protein levels were substantially reduced in injured small intestinal mucosa. Moreover, impaired synthesis of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 protein was reflected by a decrease in intramucosal enzyme activity. Subtle changes of the acyl-CoA synthetase 5 pattern correlate with conversion of intestinal epithelial cells to a gastric phenotype. These results suggest that deranged acyl-CoA synthetase 5 expression, synthesis, and activity are closely related to the state of villus architecture and epithelial homeostasis in human small intestine. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14743501
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  • 5
    Keywords: brain ; RECEPTOR ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; VIVO ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENOME ; HYBRIDIZATION ; PROTEIN ; SAMPLE ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; MICE ; PATIENT ; DOMAIN ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; TISSUES ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; DELETION ; IN-SITU ; prevention ; immunohistochemistry ; UP-REGULATION ; NUMBER ; PATHOGENESIS ; DISPLAY ; HUMAN GENOME ; SURFACE ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; genetic polymorphism ; NORMAL TISSUE ; CHAIN-REACTION ; SMALL-INTESTINE ; ULCERATIVE-COLITIS ; TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION ; inflammation ; SALIVARY AGGLUTININ ; SURFACTANT PROTEIN-D ; INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE ; MALIGNANT BRAIN-TUMORS ; SCAVENGER RECEPTOR ; in situ hybridization ; CHAIN ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; pathogen ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; inflammatory bowel disease ; LEVEL ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; SULFATE ; USA ; function ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; in vivo ; case control ; quantitative ; MUCOSAL ; EXONS ; CRP-DUCTIN ; DEXTRAN SULFATE SODIUM
    Abstract: Background & Aims: Impaired mucosal. defense plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD), one of the main subtypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1(DMBT1) is a secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein with predominant expression in. the intestine and has been proposed to exert possible functions in regenerative processes and pathogen defense. Here, we aimed at analyzing the role of DMBT1 in IBD. Methods: We studied DMBT1 expression in IBD and normal tissues by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and mRNA in situ hybridization. Genetic polymorphisms within DMBT1 were analyzed in an Italian IBD case-control sample. Dmbt1(-/-) mice were generated, characterized, and analyzed for their susceptibility to dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis. Results: DMBT1 levels correlate with disease activity in inflamed IBD tissues. A highly significant fraction of the patients with IBD displayed up-regulation of DMBT1 specifically in the intestinal epithelial surface cells and Paneth cells. A deletion allele of DMBT1 with a reduced: number of scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain coding exons is associated with an increased risk of CD (P =.00056; odds ratio, 1.75) but not for ulcerative colitis. Dmbt1(-/-) mice display enhanced susceptibility to dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and elevated Tnf, Il6, and Nod2 expression levels during inflammation. Conclusions: DMBT1 may play a role in intestinal mucosal protection and prevention of inflammation. Impaired DMBT1 function may contribute to the pathogenesis of CD
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17983803
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  • 6
    Keywords: tumor ; evaluation ; Germany ; PERFUSION ; CT ; DIAGNOSIS ; imaging ; INFORMATION ; SYSTEM ; VISUALIZATION ; VOLUME ; liver ; SITE ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; SURGERY ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; primary ; DYNAMICS ; MR ; MRI ; AGE ; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ; CHILDREN ; CHILDHOOD ; monitoring ; SOLID TUMORS ; ENHANCEMENT ; methods ; technique ; CHILD ; AGREEMENT ; pediatric ; nephroblastoma ; MEDIA ; three-dimensional ; 3D imaging ; discussion ; pediatrics ; interactive
    Abstract: Introduction: 3D imaging and surgical planning for the treatment of embryonal tumors using different techniques (CT versus MRI) are presently under discussion. Up to now, the main focus has been on visualizing the anatomy. Contrast medium dynamics have not been taken into consideration. The aim of the present study was to establish the technical means of integrating the 3D images from functional MRI data into the anatomical images and to determine clinical applications for this approach. Material and Methods: In 11 patients (mean age: 2.4 years) with solid tumors, 26 diagnostic MRI examinations were performed for primary diagnosis, treatment monitoring, or as part of the surgical planning. Seven children presented with neuroblastomas, three with Wilms' tumor, and one with advanced bilateral nephroblastomatosis. The MRI data were acquired using a 1.5-T system. For post-processing, we used volume rendering software, including an evaluation of perfusion. By using color-coded parametric images and integrating functional information, perfusion could be visualized and used for interactive surgical planning. Macroscopic and microscopic sections served as the gold standard for assessing tissue viability. Results: We were able to integrate the dynamic data into the anatomical images for all patients. A good agreement was found between the results of surgical planning, including perfusion mapping, with the surgical site, subsequently produced macroscopic sections and the results of random microscopic examinations. Conclusions: Perfusion mapping using color-coded parametric images of pediatric abdominal tumors extends the diagnostic techniques currently available. We provide first proof of the possibility of integrating functional information into 3D MR images in children. Monitoring the treatment of nephroblastoma and surgical planning for pediatric embryonal tumors represent potential applications of this technique
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18302062
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  • 7
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; THERAPY ; INFORMATION ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; microarray ; PROTEIN ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; LIGAND ; SERA ; prognosis ; T-CELL ; ASSOCIATION ; PERFORMANCE ; NEOPLASIA ; PROGRESSION ; immunohistochemistry ; METASTASIS ; SUPERFAMILY ; MULTIVARIATE ; CARCINOMAS ; NORMAL TISSUE ; gene amplification ; OVEREXPRESSION ; PROGNOSTIC FACTOR ; SERUM ; CELL CARCINOMA ; ELISA ; renal cell carcinoma ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; THERAPIES ; MEDIATED APOPTOSIS ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTOR ; ADJUVANT THERAPY ; TUMOR TISSUE ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; FAS LIGAND ; SERUM-LEVELS ; USA ; HIGH-GRADE ; PROGRESSION-FREE SURVIVAL ; PROBABILITY ; RENAL-CELL ; DCR3 ; lymph node metastasis ; PERFORMANCE STATUS
    Abstract: Background: Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a soluble protein that binds to and inactivates the death ligand CD95L. Here, we studied a possible association between DcR3 expression and prognosis in patients with renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). Methods: A tissue microarray containing RCC tumor tissue samples and corresponding normal tissue samples was generated. Decoy receptor 3 expression in tumors of 560 patients was examined by immunohistochemistry. The effect of DcR3 expression on disease-specific survival and progression-free survival was assessed using univariate analysis and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Decoy receptor 3 serum levels were determined by ELISA. Findings: High DcR3 expression was associated with high-grade (P = .005) and high-stage (P = .048) RCCs. The incidence of distant metastasis (P = .03) and lymph node metastasis (P = .002) was significantly higher in the group with high DcR3 expression. Decoy receptor 3 expression correlated negatively with disease-specific survival (P 〈 .001) and progression-free survival (P 〈 .001) in univariate analyses. A multivariate Cox regression analysis retained DcR3 expression as an independent prognostic factor that outperformed the Karnofsky performance status. In patients with high-stage RCCs expressing DcR3, the 2-year survival probability was 25%, whereas in patients with DcR3-negative tumors, the survival probability was 65% (P 〈 .001). Moreover, DcR3 serum levels were significantly higher in patients with high-stage localized disease (P = .007) and metastatic disease ( P = .001). Interpretation: DcR3 expression is an independent prognostic factor of RCC progression and mortality. Therefore, the assessment of DcR3 expression levels offers valuable prognostic information that could be used to select patients for adjuvant therapy studies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18813347
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