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  • 1
    Keywords: RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; telomerase ; GLIOMA ; SNPs ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; IDENTIFIES 5 ; 5P15.33
    Abstract: Genetic variation at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus at 5p15.33 is associated with susceptibility to several cancers, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We have carried out fine-mapping of this region in EOC which implicates an association with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the TERT promoter. We demonstrate that the minor alleles at rs2736109, and at an additional TERT promoter SNP, rs2736108, are associated with decreased breast cancer risk, and that the combination of both SNPs substantially reduces TERT promoter activity
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21949822
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  • 2
    Keywords: COHORT ; VARIANTS ; WOMEN ; HEIGHT ; METAANALYSIS ; bias ; ESTROGEN ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; PROGESTERONE-RECEPTOR STATUS ; INOSITOL POLYPHOSPHATES
    Abstract: A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (p(int)) 〈1.1 x 10(-3). None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women 170 cm (OR = 1.22, p = 0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women 〈160 cm (OR = 0.83, p = 0.039, p(int) = 1.9 x 10(-4)). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR = 0.85, p = 2.0 x 10(-4)), and absent in women who had had just one (OR = 0.96, p = 0.19, p(int) = 6.1 x 10(-4)). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR = 0.93, p = 2.8 x 10(-5)), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR = 1.07, p = 0.14, p(int) = 3.4 x 10(-4)). In conclusion, recently identified BC susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. What's new? The recent discovery of 47 susceptibility loci associated with all or estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer provided new opportunities for genetic risk prediction but it remained unclear how exposure levels of environmental (non-genetic) risk factors influenced the risk assessment. In this gene-environment study, the international team examined interactions between the single nucleotide polymorphisms and 13 established environmental risk factors including parity, height and alcohol consumption. Notably, relative risks of breast cancer associated with the susceptibility loci were not strongly modified by environmental risk factors, a finding that, if confirmed, has important implications for the risk assessment in breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25227710
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMMON ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; primary ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; STAGE ; PATTERNS ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; SNP ; DATABASE ; Jun ; POPULATIONS ; familial risk ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; SINGLE ; AGGREGATION ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ALLELES ; LEVEL ; familial aggregation ; single-nucleotide ; UNIT ; ENGLAND ; LOCI ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; breast cancer susceptibility ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; GENETIC-SUSCEPTIBILITY ; GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTOR-2
    Abstract: Breast cancer exhibits familial aggregation, consistent with variation in genetic susceptibility to the disease. Known susceptibility genes account for less than 25% of the familial risk of breast cancer, and the residual genetic variance is likely to be due to variants conferring more moderate risks. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study in 4,398 breast cancer cases and 4,316 controls, followed by a third stage in which 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for confirmation in 21,860 cases and 22,578 controls from 22 studies. We used 227,876 SNPs that were estimated to correlate with 77% of known common SNPs in Europeans at r(2) 〉 0.5. SNPs in five novel independent loci exhibited strong and consistent evidence of association with breast cancer (P 〈 10(-7)). Four of these contain plausible causative genes (FGFR2, TNRC9, MAP3K1 and LSP1). At the second stage, 1,792 SNPs were significant at the P 〈 0.05 level compared with an estimated 1,343 that would be expected by chance, indicating that many additional common susceptibility alleles may be identifiable by this approach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17529967
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  • 4
    Keywords: POPULATION ; RISK ; TUMORS ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; breast cancer ; SELECTION ; SUBTYPES ; breast cancer risk ; CONSORTIUM ; INVESTIGATORS ; MODIFIERS ; COMMON VARIANTS ; GENETIC-VARIANTS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ALLELES ; ZNF365
    Abstract: BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 x 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 x 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 x 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2 x 10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23544013
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  • 5
    Keywords: VARIANTS ; WOMEN ; pooled analysis ; mammographic density ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONSORTIUM ; FGFR2 ; HORMONE-THERAPY ; TUMOR SUBTYPES ; 14Q24.1 RAD51L1
    Abstract: Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (P-interaction = 2.4 x 10(-6)) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (P-interaction = 3.1 x 10(-4)). Overall, the perallele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of 〈20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85) in those who drank 〉= 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (P-interaction = 5.3 x 10(-5)), with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17) in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05) in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23544014
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; CARCINOGENESIS ; BIOMARKERS ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; hormone ; HEALTH ; AGE ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; GERMLINE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SINGLE ; VARIANT ; DETERMINANTS ; prospective studies ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; HAPLOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPES ; LOCUS ; USA ; HORMONES ; HORMONE LEVELS ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; prospective study ; STEROID-HORMONES ; JAPANESE ; UNIT ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; ESTROGEN-LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; ANDROGEN ; COMMON VARIANT ; SEX-HORMONES ; JAPANESE POPULATION ; androgens ; NONCARRIERS ; FREE TESTOSTERONE ; SERUM ANDROGENS ; CONSORTIUM ; 3 ; Genetic ; genetic variation ; COMMON VARIANTS ; GENE VARIANT ; ALLELIC VARIANTS ; ANDROGEN BIOSYNTHESIS ; UNRELATED INDIVIDUALS
    Abstract: Sex hormones, particularly the androgens, are important for the growth of the prostate gland and have been implicated in prostate cancer carcinogenesis, yet the determinants of endogenous steroid hormone levels remain poorly understood. Twin studies suggest a heritable component for circulating concentrations of sex hormones, although epidemiologic evidence linking steroid hormone gene variants to prostate cancer is limited. Here we report on findings from a comprehensive study of genetic variation at the CYP19A1 locus in relation to prostate cancer risk and to circulating steroid hormone concentrations in men by the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), a large collaborative prospective study. The BPC3 systematically characterized variation in CYP19A1 by targeted resequencing and dense genotyping; selected haplotype-tagging single nuclecitide polymorphisms (htSNP) that efficiently predict common variants in U.S. and Europe-an whites, Latinos, Japanese Americans, and Native Hawaiians; and genotyped these htSNPs; in 8,166 prostate cancer cases and 9,079 study-, age-, and ethnicity-matched controls. CYP19A1 htSNPs, two common missense variants and common haplotypes were not significantly associated with risk of prostate cancer. However, several htSNPs in linkage disequilibrium blocks 3 and 4 were significantly associated with a 5% to 10% difference in estradiol concentrations in men [association per copy of the two-SNP haplotype rs749292-rs727479 (A-A) versus noncarriers; P = 1 x 10(-5)], and with inverse, although less marked changes, in free testosterone concentrations. These results suggest that although germline variation in CYP19A1 characterized by the htSNPs produces measurable differences in sex hormone concentrations in men, they do not substantially influence risk of prostate cancer. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(10):2734-44)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19789370
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  • 7
    Keywords: GENE ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; WOMEN ; ESTROGEN ; ATM
    Abstract: Background Using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, the authors previously reported that the single nucleotide polymorphism 7q21-rs6964587 (AKAP9-M463I) is associated with breast cancer risk. The authors have now assessed this association more comprehensively using 16 independent case-control studies. Methods The authors genotyped 14 843 invasive case patients and 19 852 control subjects with white European ancestry and 2595 invasive case patients and 2192 control subjects with Asian ancestry. ORs were estimated by logistic regression, adjusted for study. Heterogeneity in ORs was assessed by fitting interaction terms or by subclassifying case patients and applying polytomous logistic regression. Results For white European women, the minor T allele of 7q21-rs6964587 was associated with breast cancer risk under a recessive model (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.13, p=0.04). Results were inconclusive for Asian women. From a combined analysis of 24 154 case patients and 33 376 control subjects of white European ancestry from the present and previous series, the best-fitting model was recessive, with an estimated OR of 1.08 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.13, p=0.001). The OR was greater at younger ages (p trend=0.01). Conclusion This may be the first common susceptibility allele for breast cancer to be identified with a recessive mode of inheritance
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21931171
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; DNA adducts ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; REPAIR ; cancer risk ; familial risk ; SERIES ; EXCISION-REPAIR ; SINGLE ; RE ; BRCA2 ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; XPD ; GENOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPE ; invasive breast cancer
    Abstract: A substantial proportion of the familial risk of breast cancer may be due to genetic variants, each contributing a small effect. The protein encoded by ERCC2 is a key enzyme involved in nucleotide excision repair, in which gene defects could lead to cancer prone syndromes such as Xeroderma pigmentosum D. We have examined the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ERCC2 gene and the incidence of invasive breast cancer in three case-control series, with a maximum of 3,634 patients and of 3,340 controls. None of the three single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with the incidence of breast cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16030124
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; human ; LUNG ; MODEL ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EXPOSURE ; GENE ; GENES ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; DNA ; REDUCTION ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; FREQUENCIES ; NUMBER ; REPAIR ; leukemia ; ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA ; BLADDER-CANCER ; REGION ; DNA repair ; DNA-REPAIR GENES ; VARIANT ; FUNCTIONAL-CHARACTERIZATION ; CATECHOL-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; prospective ; LUNG-CANCER RISK ; VARIABLES ; metabolic gene polymorphisms ; METABOLISM GENES
    Abstract: It is becoming increasingly evident that single-locus effects cannot explain complex multifactorial human diseases like cancer. We applied the multi-factor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method to a large cohort study on gene-environment and gene-gene interactions. The study (case-control nested in the EPIC cohort) was established to investigate molecular changes and genetic susceptibility in relation to air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in non-smokers. We have analyzed 757 controls and 409 cases with bladder cancer (n = 124), lung cancer (n = 116) and myeloid leukemia (n = 169). Thirty-six gene variants (DNA repair and metabolic genes) and three environmental exposure variables (measures of air pollution and ETS at home and at work) were analyzed. Interactions were assessed by prediction error percentage and cross-validation consistency (CVC) frequency. For lung cancer, the best model was given by a significant gene-environment association between the base excision repair (BER) XRCC1-Arg399Gln polymorphism, the double-strand break repair (DSBR) BRCA2-Asn372His polymorphism and the exposure variable 'distance from heavy traffic road', an indirect and robust indicator of air pollution (mean prediction error of 26%, P 〈 0.001, mean CVC of 6.60, P = 0.02). For bladder cancer, we found a significant 4-loci association between the BER APE1-Asp148Glu polymorphism, the DSBR RAD52-3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) polymorphism and the metabolic gene polymorphisms COMT-Val158Met and MTHFR-677C 〉 T (mean prediction error of 22%, P 〈 0.001, mean CVC consistency of 7.40, P 〈 0.037). For leukemia, a 3-loci model including RAD52-2259C 〉 T, MnSOD-Ala9Val and CYP1A1-Ile462Val had a minimum prediction error of 31% (P 〈 0.001) and a maximum CVC of 4.40 (P = 0.086). The MDR method seems promising, because it provides a limited number of statistically stable interactions; however, the biological interpretation remains to be understood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16956909
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  • 10
    Keywords: CELLS ; DISEASE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; VARIANTS ; REVEALS ; BREAST-CANCER RISK ; METAANALYSIS ; WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CENTRAL PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY ; HUMAN PREFRONTAL CORTEX
    Abstract: Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-causemortality(1). Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation(2,3), but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P 〈 5 x 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25231870
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