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  • 1
    Keywords: DISEASE ; VARIANTS ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; BLADDER-CANCER ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; METAANALYSIS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; imputation ; RISK LOCI ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS
    Abstract: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 x 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 x 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 x 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 x 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 x 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 x 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25086665
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; RELEASE ; RISK-FACTORS ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; prevention ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; SNP ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; POPULATIONS ; genetic polymorphism ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CODE ; SINGLE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; LEVEL ; HAPLOTYPE ; HORMONES ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; COMMON VARIANT ; LUTEINIZING-HORMONE ; androgens ; ESTROGENS ; CONSORTIUM ; androstenedione ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS
    Abstract: Background: Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). Methods: We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study ( NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids ( androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results: Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion: Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19640273
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; STAGE ; IDENTIFICATION ; HEALTH ; SNP ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; diabetes ; REPLICATION ; FUTURE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; VARIANT ; METAANALYSIS ; biomarker ; methods ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; genetic association ; SCAN ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Type ; single nucleotide ; RISK-ASSOCIATED LOCI
    Abstract: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (PrCa). In the two-stage Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility prostate cancer scan, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10486567, located within intron 2 of JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2, showed a promising association with PrCa overall (P = 2.14 x 10(-6)), with a suggestion of stronger association with aggressive disease (P = 1.2 x 10(-7)). Methods: In the third stage of genome-wide association studies, we genotyped 106 JAZF1 SNPs in 10,286 PrCa cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry. Results: The strongest association was observed with the initial marker rs10486567, which now achieves genome-wide significance [P = 7.79 x 10(-11); ORHET, 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.27); ORHOM, 1.37 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.56)]. We did not confirm a previous suggestion of a stronger association of rs10486567 with aggressive disease (P = 1.60 x 10(-4) for aggressive cancer, n = 4,597; P = 3.25 x 10(-8) for non-aggressive cancer, n = 4,514). Based on a multilocus model with adjustment for rs10486567, no additional independent signals were observed at chromosome 7p15.2. There was no association between PrCa risk and SNPs in JAZF1 previously associated with height (rs849140; P = 0.587), body stature (rs849141, tagged by rs849136; P = 0.171), and risk of type 2 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus (rs864745, tagged by rs849142; P = 0.657). Conclusion: rs10486567 remains the most significant marker for PrCa risk within JAZF1 in individuals of European ancestry. Impact: Future studies should identify all variants in high linkage disequilibrium with rs10486567 and evaluate their functional significance for PrCa. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(5); 1349-55. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20406958
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  • 4
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; MECHANISM ; MARKER ; RISK-FACTORS ; mechanisms ; BINDING ; CELL-LINES ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; prevention ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; SNP ; risk factors ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; cancer risk ; DATABASE ; REGION ; REGIONS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PROGRAM ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; LOCUS ; single-nucleotide ; BLOCKS ; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE-SULFATE ; SEX-HORMONE LEVELS ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; ANDROGEN ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; CAG REPEAT POLYMORPHISM ; COMMON VARIANT ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; NURSES HEALTH ; POLYGLUTAMINE TRACTS ; POSSIBLE MECHANISMS ; RECEPTOR GENE ; SET ; VITAMIN-D-RECEPTOR
    Abstract: Introduction Androgens have been hypothesised to influence risk of breast cancer through several possible mechanisms, including their conversion to estradiol or their binding to the oestrogen receptor and/ or androgen receptor ( AR) in the breast. Here, we report on the results of a large and comprehensive study of the association between genetic variation in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium ( BPC3). Methods The underlying genetic variation was determined by first sequencing the coding regions of the AR gene in a panel of 95 advanced breast cancer cases. Second, a dense set of markers from the public database was genotyped in a panel of 349 healthy women. The linkage disequilibrium relationships ( blocks) across the gene were then identified, and haplotypetagging single nucleotide polymorphisms ( htSNPs) were selected to capture the common genetic variation across the locus. The htSNPs were then genotyped in the nested breast cancer cases and controls from the Cancer Prevention Study II, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, Multiethnic Cohort, Nurses' Health Study, and Women's Health Study cohorts ( 5,603 breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls). Results We found no association between any genetic variation ( SNP, haplotype, or the exon 1 CAG repeat) in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer, nor were any statistical interactions with known breast cancer risk factors observed. Conclusion Among postmenopausal Caucasian women, common variants of the AR gene are not associated with risk of breast cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16987421
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMMON ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; primary ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; STAGE ; PATTERNS ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; SNP ; DATABASE ; Jun ; POPULATIONS ; familial risk ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; SINGLE ; AGGREGATION ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ALLELES ; LEVEL ; familial aggregation ; single-nucleotide ; UNIT ; ENGLAND ; LOCI ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; breast cancer susceptibility ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; GENETIC-SUSCEPTIBILITY ; GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTOR-2
    Abstract: Breast cancer exhibits familial aggregation, consistent with variation in genetic susceptibility to the disease. Known susceptibility genes account for less than 25% of the familial risk of breast cancer, and the residual genetic variance is likely to be due to variants conferring more moderate risks. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study in 4,398 breast cancer cases and 4,316 controls, followed by a third stage in which 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for confirmation in 21,860 cases and 22,578 controls from 22 studies. We used 227,876 SNPs that were estimated to correlate with 77% of known common SNPs in Europeans at r(2) 〉 0.5. SNPs in five novel independent loci exhibited strong and consistent evidence of association with breast cancer (P 〈 10(-7)). Four of these contain plausible causative genes (FGFR2, TNRC9, MAP3K1 and LSP1). At the second stage, 1,792 SNPs were significant at the P 〈 0.05 level compared with an estimated 1,343 that would be expected by chance, indicating that many additional common susceptibility alleles may be identifiable by this approach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17529967
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; BLOOD ; human ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; DESIGN ; genetics ; SNP ; RATES ; case-control studies ; INDIVIDUALS ; pancreatic cancer ; MAPS ; case control study ; case-control study ; WORLDWIDE ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; VARIANT ; SNPs ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; USA ; prospective ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; BLOOD-GROUP ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; WOMENS HEALTH ; Genetic ; Genome-wide association studies ; ALLERGIES ; CONFIDENCE ; RATIONALE
    Abstract: We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer, a cancer with one of the lowest survival rates worldwide. We genotyped 558,542 SNPs in 1,896 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 1,939 controls drawn from 12 prospective cohorts plus one hospital-based casecontrol study. We conducted a combined analysis of these groups plus an additional 2,457 affected individuals and 2,654 controls from eight case-control studies, adjusting for study, sex, ancestry and five principal components. We identified an association between a locus on 9q34 and pancreatic cancer marked by the SNP rs505922 (combined P = 5.37 x 10(-8); multiplicative per-allele odds ratio 1.20; 95% confidence interval 1.12-1.28). This SNP maps to the first intron of the ABO blood group gene. Our results are consistent with earlier epidemiologic evidence suggesting that people with blood group O may have a lower risk of pancreatic cancer than those with groups A or B
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19648918
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; LUNG ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; genetics ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; REGION ; telomerase ; case-control study ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; prospective ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; WOMENS HEALTH ; Genetic ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS
    Abstract: We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20101243
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; GENOTYPES ; SMOKERS ; pancreatic cancer ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; ALLELES ; GENOTYPE ; LOCUS ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; GENETIC-BASIS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; BOSTON ; Type ; COHORTS ; STRATIFICATION ; GROUP ANTIGENS
    Abstract: A recent genome-wide association study (PanScan) identified significant associations at the ABO gene locus with risk of pancreatic cancer, but the influence of specific ABO genotypes remains unknown. We determined ABO genotypes (OO, AO, AA, AB, BO, and BB) in 1,534 cases and 1,583 controls from 12 prospective cohorts in PanScan, grouping participants by genotype-derived serologic blood type (O, A, AB, and B). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer by ABO alleles were calculated using logistic regression. Compared with blood type O, the ORs for pancreatic cancer in subjects with types A, AB, and B were 1.38 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.18-1.62], 1.47 (95% CI, 1.07-2.02), and 1.53 (95% CI, 1.21-1.92), respectively. The incidence rates for blood types O, A, AB, and B were 28.9, 39.9, 41.8, and 44.5 cases per 100,000 subjects per year. An increase in risk was noted with the addition of each non-O allele. Compared with OO genotype, subjects with AO and AA genotype had ORs of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.13-1.58) and 1.61 (95% CI, 1.22-2.18), whereas subjects with BO and BB genotypes had ORs of 1.45 (95% CI, 1.14-1.85) and 2.42 (1.28-4.57). The population attributable fraction for non-O blood type was 19.5%. In a joint model with smoking, current smokers with non-O blood type had an adjusted OR of 2.68 (95% CI, 2.03-3.54) compared with nonsmokers of blood type O. We concluded that ABO genotypes were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Cancer Res; 70(3); 1015-23. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20103627
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; IDENTIFICATION ; METAANALYSIS ; LOCUS ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MULTIPLE LOCI ; HEPATOCYTE NUCLEAR FACTOR-1-BETA
    Abstract: Previous genome-wide association studies have identified two independent variants in HNF1B as susceptibility loci for prostate cancer risk. To fine-map common genetic variation in this region, we genotyped 79 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 17q12 region harboring HNF1B in 10 272 prostate cancer cases and 9123 controls of European ancestry from 10 case-control studies as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. Ten SNPs were significantly related to prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significance level of P 〈 5 x 10(-8) with the most significant association with rs4430796 (P = 1.62 x 10(-24)). However, risk within this first locus was not entirely explained by rs4430796. Although modestly correlated (r(2) = 0.64), rs7405696 was also associated with risk (P = 9.35 x 10(-23)) even after adjustment for rs4430769 (P = 0.007). As expected, rs11649743 was related to prostate cancer risk (P = 3.54 x 10(-8)); however, the association within this second locus was stronger for rs4794758 (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)), which explained all of the risk observed with rs11649743 when both SNPs were included in the same model (P = 0.32 for rs11649743; P = 0.002 for rs4794758). Sequential conditional analyses indicated that five SNPs (rs4430796, rs7405696, rs4794758, rs1016990 and rs3094509) together comprise the best model for risk in this region. This study demonstrates a complex relationship between variants in the HNF1B region and prostate cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the biological basis of the association of variants in 17q12 with prostate cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21576123
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  • 10
    Keywords: POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; prevention ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; D-BINDING PROTEIN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that vitamin D status may be associated with prostate cancer risk although the direction and strength of this association differs between experimental and observational studies. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status. We examined prostate cancer risk in relation to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in four genes shown to predict circulating levels of 25(OH)D. METHODS: SNP markers localized to each of four genes (GC, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, and DHCR7) previously associated with 25(OH)D were genotyped in 10,018 cases and 11,052 controls from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and cumulative association between genetic variants and risk of overall and aggressive prostate cancer. RESULTS: We observed a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men with the allele in rs6013897 near CYP24A1 associated with lower serum 25(OH)D [per A allele, OR, 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.80-0.93; Ptrend = 0.0002) but an increased risk for nonaggressive disease (per A allele: OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.17; Ptrend = 0.002). Examination of a polygenic score of the four SNPs revealed statistically significantly lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men with a greater number of low vitamin D alleles (OR for 6-8 vs. 0-1 alleles, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.98; Ptrend = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: In this large, pooled analysis, genetic variants related to lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. IMPACT: Our genetic findings do not support a protective association between loci known to influence vitamin D levels and prostate cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23377224
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