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  • VEGETABLES  (6)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; evaluation ; Germany ; LUNG ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; incidence ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; FREQUENCIES ; NO ; smoking ; cancer risk ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; MULTIVARIATE ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; LIFE-STYLE ; BETA-CAROTENE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; INCREASE ; NONSMOKING WOMEN ; VITAMIN-C ; pooled analysis ; USA ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; comparison ; ERROR ; CHINESE WOMEN ; DIETARY CAROTENOIDS
    Abstract: The association of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer incidence was evaluated using the most recent data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), applying a refined statistical approach (calibration) to account for measurement error potentially introduced by using food frequency questionnaire data. Between 1992 and 2000, detailed information on diet and life-style of 478,590 individuals participating in EPIC was collected. During a median follow-up of 6.4 years, 1,126 lung cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were applied for statistical evaluation. In the whole study population, fruit consumption was significantly inversely associated with lung cancer risk while no association was found for vegetable consumption. In current smokers, however, lung cancer risk significantly decreased with higher vegetable consumption; this association became more pronounced after calibration, the hazard ratio (HR) being 0.78 (95% CI 0.620.98) per 100 g increase in daily vegetable consumption. In comparison, the HR per 100 g fruit was 0.92 (0.85-0.99) in the entire cohort and 0.90 (0.81-0.99) in smokers. Exclusion of cases diagnosed during the first 2 years of follow-up strengthened these associations, the HR being 0.71 (0.55-0.94) for vegetables (smokers) and 0.86 (0.78-0.95) for fruit (entire cohort). Cancer incidence decreased with higher consumption of apples and pears (entire cohort) as well as root vegetables (smokers). In addition to an overall inverse association with fruit intake, the results of this evaluation add evidence for a significant inverse association of vegetable consumption and lung cancer incidence in smokers. (C) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17487840
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; CARCINOGENESIS ; PHOSPHORUS ; NEOPLASIA ; HEALTH ; AGE ; WOMEN ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; DIETARY ; CALCIUM ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; nutrient intake ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; RECALL ; IRON ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; POTASSIUM ; MAINTENANCE ; 24-h dietary recall ; RATIONALE ; EPIC-soft ; magnesium ; minerals ; nutrient intakes
    Abstract: Background/objectives: Adequate mineral intake is important for the maintenance of bone health, cellular function and general metabolism, and possibly in the aetiology of cancer and other chronic diseases. This study aimed at investigating variation in intakes of selected minerals across 10 European countries participating in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study. Methods: Nutrient intakes for 36 034 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in 27 centres were obtained using standardized 24-h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). Mean intakes of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and potassium were calculated by centre and weighted by season and day of the week and were also stratified by age group. The contribution of food groups to total nutrient intake was calculated. Results: There was clear geographical variability in intakes, with differences ranging from 35% for magnesium to 90% for iron in men and 36% for potassium to 75% for calcium in women, and a twofold difference in sources of haem iron (meat and fish). There was a geographical gradient in iron intake, with higher intakes in Southern than in Northern Europe and also around a twofold north-south gradient in the contribution of fruits and vegetables to potassium intake. Compared with reference intakes, the majority of age groups and centres had intakes above the recommended levels. Dairy foods and products contributed the most to calcium and phosphorus intake in almost all centres. Cereals and cereal products contributed the most to magnesium and iron intakes, except in Greece and Germany. Conclusions: Intakes of minerals vary substantially throughout Europe, with some geographical variability in their food sources.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19888269
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  • 3
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; COMMON ; POPULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; lifestyle ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; COUNTRIES ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; INDIVIDUALS ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; meat ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; TRENDS ; EUROPE ; LOCATION ; FOOD ; physical activity ; YOUNG ; SINGLE ; ADULTS ; REGRESSION ; DETERMINANTS ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; RECALL ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; YOUNG-ADULTS ; EXTENT ; ENGLAND ; FOODS ; 24-hour dietary recall ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; correlates ; comparison ; lipid ; household ; eating locations ; eating out of home ; energy intake
    Abstract: Objective: To compare the average out-of-home (OH) consumption of foods and beverages, as well as energy intake, among populations from 10 European countries and to describe the characteristics of substantial OH caters, as defined for the purpose of the present study, in comparison to other individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Dietary data were collected through single 24-hour dietary recalls, in which the place of consumption was recorded. For the present study, substantial OH eaters were defined as those who consumed more than 25% of total daily energy intake at locations other than the household premises. Mean dietary intakes and the proportion of substantial OH eaters are presented by food group and country. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds of being a substantial OH eater in comparison to not being one, using mutually adjusted possible non-dietary determinants. Setting: Ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Subjects: The subjects were 34 270 individuals, 12 537 men and 21733 women, aged 35-74 years. Results: The fraction of energy intake during OH eating was generally higher in northern European countries than in the southern ones. Among the food and beverage groups, those selectively consumed outside the home were coffee/tea/waters and sweets and, to a lesser extent, cereals, meats, added lipids and vegetables. Substantial OH eating was positively associated with energy intake and inversely associated with age and physical activity. Substantial OH eating was less common among the less educated compared with the more educated, and more common during weekdays in central and north Europe and during the weekend in south Europe. Conclusions: Eating outside the home was associated with sedentary lifestyle and increased energy intake; it was more common among the young and concerned in particular coffee/tea/waters and sweets
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17582244
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROTEIN ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; RECALL ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; EPIC PROJECT ; METAANALYSIS ; SUBTYPES ; fish consumption ; ERRORS ; 24-h dietary recall ; ENDB ; WEIGHT-LOSS ; animal proteins ; EPIC-soft ; plant proteins ; total proteins
    Abstract: Objective: To describe dietary protein intakes and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 persons, aged between 35 and 74 years, were administered a standardized 24-h dietary recall (24-HDR) using a computerized interview software programme (EPIC-SOFT). Intakes (g/day) of total, animal and plant proteins were estimated using the standardized EPIC Nutrient Database (ENDB). Mean intakes were adjusted for age, and weighted by season and day of recall. Results: Mean total and animal protein intakes were highest in the Spanish centres among men, and in the Spanish and French centres among women; the lowest mean intakes were observed in the UK health-conscious group, in Greek men and women, and in women in Potsdam. Intake of plant protein was highest among the UK health-conscious group, followed by some of the Italian centres and Murcia, whereas Sweden and Potsdam had the lowest intake. Cereals contributed to the highest proportion of plant protein in all centres. The combined intake of legumes, vegetables and fruit contributed to a greater proportion of plant protein in the southern than in the northern centres. Total meat intake (with some heterogeneity across subtypes of meat) was, with few exceptions, the most important contributor to animal protein in all centres, followed by dairy and fish products. Conclusions: This study shows that intake of protein, especially of animal origin, differs across the 10 European countries, and also shows some differences in food sources of protein across Europe.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19888272
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; AGE ; WOMEN ; COUNTRIES ; DATABASE ; DIETARY ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; LIFE-STYLE ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; RECALL ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; EPIC PROJECT ; VITAMIN-C ; VITAMINS ; dietary intake ; STANDARDIZATION ; 24-h dietary recall ; ENDB ; RATIONALE ; EPIC-soft ; water-soluble vitamins
    Abstract: Objectives: To describe the intake of vitamins thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cobalamine) and C (ascorbic acid) and their food sources among 27 centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 persons aged between 35 and 74 years were administered a standardized 24-h dietary recall using a computerized interview software programme (EPIC-SOFT). Intakes of the four B vitamins and vitamin C were estimated using the standardized EPIC Nutrient Database (ENDB). Mean intakes were adjusted for age and weighted by season and day of recall. Results: Intake of B vitamins did not vary considerably between centres, except in the UK health-conscious cohort, in which substantially higher intakes of thiamine and lower intakes of vitamin B12 were reported compared with other centres. Overall, meat was the most important contributor to the B vitamins in all centres except in the UK health-conscious group. Vitamin C showed a clear geographical gradient, with higher intakes in the southern centres as compared with the northern ones; this was more pronounced in men than in women. Vegetables and fruits were major contributors to vitamin C in all centres, but juices and potatoes were also important sources in the northern centres. Conclusions: This study showed no major differences across centres in the mean intakes of B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, B6, B12), whereas a tendency towards a north-south gradient was observed for vitamin C.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19888270
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; AGE ; WOMEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DATABASE ; DIET ; EPIC ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; nutrient intake ; BETA-CAROTENE ; physical activity ; RETINOL ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; RECALL ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; EPIC PROJECT ; ADJUSTMENT ; MEAT CONSUMPTION ; dietary intake ; RECALLS ; vitamin D ; energy intake ; LEVEL CORRELATIONS ; 24-h dietary recall ; Vitamin E ; EPIC-soft ; D INSUFFICIENCY ; PLASMA CAROTENOIDS
    Abstract: Objectives: To describe the intake of the fat-soluble nutrients retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin D and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 subjects (age range: 35-74 years) completed a single standardized 24-h dietary recall using a computerized interview software program (EPIC-SOFT). Intakes of the fat-soluble nutrients were estimated using the standardized EPIC Nutrient Database. Results: For all the nutrients, in most centres, men had a higher level of intake than did women, even after adjustments for total energy intake and anthropometric confounders. Distinct regional gradients from northern to southern European countries were observed for all nutrients. The level intake of beta-carotene and vitamin E also showed some differences by level of education, smoking status and physical activity. No meaningful differences in the nutrient intake were observed by age range. Conclusions: These results show differences by study centre, gender, age and various lifestyle variables in the intake of retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin D between 10 European countries.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19888271
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