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  • 1
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: Portunidae ; population genetics ; gene flow ; allozymes ; estuarine retention
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The population genetic structure of the swimming crab Callinectes danae (Crustacea, Portunidae) was studied by allozyme electrophoresis along the southern coast of Brazil (Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul States). The biology of C. danae is poorly known, but some studies suggest that this species depends on estuaries for reproduction and for completing its life cycle, using them as recruitment sites and nursery grounds. If estuarine retention is an important process acting in favour of the recruitment of local populations, we should expect restriction of gene flow among populations inhabiting different estuaries. Therefore, our aim was to establish whether gene flow between populations of C. danaefrom different estuaries was restricted. Samples were collected in four estuaries: São Francisco do Sul, Laguna (Santa Catarina), Patos Lagoon and Chuí Stream (Rio Grande do Sul). Eleven loci were resolved. Contingency table tests (χ2 and G) showed significant differences (P≤0.05) between pair-wise subpopulation comparisons. The estimated F ST was θ=0.065±0.019, suggesting a moderate structuring of C. danae populations. No relationship was found for the number of migrants between pairs of subpopulations and the geographic distance separating them (P= 0.292; r 2= 0.269). Nevertheless, UPGMA analysis clustered together those estuaries separated by less than 250 km. Low adult migration, the requirement of estuaries as reproductive areas, recruitment sites and nursery grounds for juveniles, together with larval and post-larval retention processes, are discussed in the context of their importance in preventing panmixia among subpopulations inhabiting different estuaries.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Keywords: Crustacea ; Majidae ; allozymes ; gene flow ; larval dispersal ; Inachus ; Hyas
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The spider crabs Inachus dorsettensis (Pennant) and Hyas coarctatus Leach are widespread in subtidal areas of muddy sand or gravel around western Europe. Both species have a life cycle with an obligatory planktonic larval phase of several weeks, which might be expected to cause widespread larval dispersal and consequent genetic homogeneity over considerable distances. However, earlier work on both taxa has indicated differences in growth pattern between populations separated by tens of kilometres. This study was undertaken to determine whether these differences were purely environmental or whether, despite the short distances involved, differences may have a genetic basis. A study of gene frequencies, as indicated by allozymes in samples of adults collected off the Isle of Man (northern Irish Sea), indicates significant genetic differentiation between populations over a geographical distance of only about 40 km in both Inachus dorsettensis (θ = 0.086 ± 0.048) and Hyas coarctatus (θ = 0.023 ± 0.017). Variability measures differed between species, showing I. dorsettensis to have a mean number of alleles per locus of 2.5–2.6 and a range of gene diversity of 0.216–0.241, while H. coarctatus showed lower values of mean number of alleles (1.9–2.0) and a range of gene diversity from 0.122 to 0.124. Given the high expected larval mobility of the two species the results are most surprising. Possible explanations are discussed in relation to population discontinuities and patterns of larval drift.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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