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  • breast cancer  (7)
  • 1
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; proliferation ; tumor ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; RELEASE ; PATIENT ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; SOMATOSTATIN ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; IGF-I ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; cell proliferation ; development ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; GENOTYPE DATA ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; IGFBP3 ; insulin-like growth factor ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; SERUM-LEVELS
    Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates cell proliferation and can enhance the development of tumors in different organs. Epidemiologic studies have shown that an elevated level of circulating IGF-I is associated to increased risk of breast cancer as well as other cancers. Genetic variants affecting the release or biological action of growth hormone (GH), the main stimulator of IGF-I production, may predict circulating levels of IGF-I and have an effect on cancer risk. We tested this hypothesis with a large case-control study of 807 breast cancer patients and 1,588 matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We genotyped 22 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 genes involved in GH production and action (GHRH, GHRHR, SST, SSTR1-SSTR5, POU1F1, and GH1), and in parallel, we measured serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, its major binding protein, in samples of cases and controls. SST and SSTR2 polymorphisms showed weak but statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. SSTR5 polymorphisms were associated with IGF-I levels, whereas one polymorphism in GHRHR and one in POU1F1 were associated with IGFBP-3 levels. Our conclusion is that common genetic variation in the GH synthesis pathway, as measured by single nucleotide polymorphisms selected in the present study, is not a major determinant of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 circulating levels, and it does not play a major role in altering breast cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16214911
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; human ; VITRO ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACIDS ; HUMANS ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; fatty acids ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; RELATIVE RISK ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; ADIPOSE-TISSUE ; POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ASSOCIATIONS ; INTERVAL ; prospective ; MEAT INTAKE ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; fish consumption ; N-3
    Abstract: There is current interest in fish consumption and marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and breast cancer risk. Some in vitro and animal studies have suggested an inhibitory effect of marine n-3 fatty acids on breast cancer growth, but the results from epidemiological studies that have examined the association between fish consumption and breast cancer risk in humans are inconsistent. We examined fish consumption and breast cancer risk in 310,671 women aged between 25 and 70 yr at recruitment into the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The participants completed a dietary questionnaire between 1992-98 and were followed up for incidence of breast cancer for a median of 6.4 yr. Hazard ratio for breast cancer by intake of total and lean and fatty fish were estimated, stratified by study centre and adjusted for established breast cancer risk factors. During follow-up, 4,776 invasive incident breast cancers were reported. No significant associations between intake of total fish and breast cancer risk were observed, hazard ratio (HR) 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99-1.02; p = 0.28 per 10 g fish/day). When examining lean and ratty fish separately, we round a positive significant association only in the highest quintile for fatty fish (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01-1.26), but test for trend was not significant (p = 0.10). No associations with breast cancer risk were observed when the study participants were subdivided by menopausal status. Although the period of follow-up is relatively short, the results provide no evidence for an association between fish intake and breast cancer risk. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16470807
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  • 3
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; THERAPY ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; cancer risk ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; TRENDS ; FOOD-FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; THERAPIES ; INCREASE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC PROJECT ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; USA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; postmenopausal ; RATIO ; energy intake ; breast cancer risk ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; hazard ratio ; hormone therapy
    Abstract: Background: Epidemiologic studies have produced conflicting results with respect to an association of dietary fat with breast cancer. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between fat consumption and breast cancer. Design: We prospectively investigated fat consumption in a large (n = 319 826), geographically and culturally heterogeneous cohort of European women enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition who completed a dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 8.8 y of follow-up, 7119 women developed breast cancer. Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and center and adjusted for energy intake and confounders, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for breast cancer. Results: An association between high saturated fat intake and greater breast cancer risk was found [HR = 1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.27; P for trend = 0.038) for the highest quintile of saturated fat intake compared with the lowest quintile: 1.02 (1.00, 1.04) for a 20% increase in saturated fat consumption (continuous variable)]. No significant association of breast cancer with total, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat was found, although trends were for a direct association of risk with monounsaturated fat and an inverse association with polyunsaturated fat. In menopausal women, the positive association with saturated fat was confined to nonusers of hormone therapy at baseline [1.21 (0.99, 1.48) for the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile; P for trend = 0.044; and 1.03 (1.00, 1.07) for a 20% increase in saturated fat as a continuous variable]. Conclusions: Evidence indicates a weak positive association between saturated fat intake and breast cancer risk. This association was more pronounced for postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88: 1304-12
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18996867
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; THERAPY ; cohort studies ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; breast cancer ; DECREASE ; WOMEN ; NETHERLANDS ; UNITED-STATES ; REGIMENS ; menopause ; METAANALYSIS ; ESTROGEN PLUS PROGESTIN ; HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; HRT USE ; ESTROGENS ; DANISH COHORT ; dosage ; HRT ; progestins
    Abstract: Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is characterized by use of different constituents, regimens and routes of administration. We investigated the association between the use of different types of MHT and breast cancer risk in the EPIC cohort study. The analysis is based on data from 133,744 postmenopausal women. Approximately 133,744 postmenopausal women contributed to this analysis. Information on MHT was derived from country-specific self-administered questionnaires with a single baseline assessment. Incident breast cancers were identified through population cancer registries or by active follow-up (mean: 8.6 yr). Overall relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were derived from country-specific Cox proportional hazard models estimates. A total of 4312 primary breast cancers were diagnosed during 1,153,747 person-years of follow-up. Compared with MHT never users, breast cancer risk was higher among current users of estrogen only (RR: 1.42, 95% CI 1.23-1.64) and higher still among current users of combined MHT (RR: 1.77, 95% CI 1.40-2.24; p = 0.02 for combined vs. estrogen-only). Continuous combined regimens conferred a 43% (95% CI: 19-72%) greater risk compared with sequential regimens. There was no significant difference between progesterone and testosterone derivatives in sequential regimens. There was no significant variation in risk linked to the estrogenic component of MHT, neither for oral vs. cutaneous administration nor for estradiol compounds vs. conjugated equine estrogens. Estrogen-only and combined MHT uses were associated with increased breast cancer risk. Continuous combined preparations were associated with the highest risk. Further studies are needed to disentangle the effects of the regimen and the progestin component
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20232395
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; proliferation ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; PATIENT ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; WOMEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FACTOR-I ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; RE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; CANDIDATE GENES ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; single-nucleotide ; GENOTYPE DATA ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ALPHA-5-BETA-1 INTEGRIN ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFALS ; IGFBP-1 ; IGFBP-3 ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT
    Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) stimulates cell proliferation and can enhance the development of tumours in different organs. Epidemiological studies have shown that an elevated level of circulating IGF-1 is associated with increased risk of breast cancer, as well as of other cancers. Most of circulating IGF-I is bound to an acid-labile subunit and to one of six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), among which the most important are IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-1. Polymorphisms of the IGF1 gene and of genes encoding for the major IGF-1 carriers may predict circulating levels of IGF-1 and have an impact on cancer risk. We tested this hypothesis with a case - control study of 807 breast cancer patients and 1588 matched control subjects, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We genotyped 23 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in IGF1, IGFBP1, IGFBP3 and IGFALS, and measured serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in samples of cases and controls. We found a weak but significant association of polymorphisms at the 50 end of the IGF1 gene with breast cancer risk, particularly among women younger than 55 years, and a strong association of polymorphisms located in the 50 end of IGFBP3 with circulating levels of IGFBP-3, which confirms previous findings. Common genetic variation in these candidate genes does not play a major role in altering breast cancer risk in Caucasians
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16404426
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; INHIBITION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; SEQUENCE ; SEQUENCES ; FREQUENCY ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; FREQUENCIES ; ALPHA ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACID ; HEALTH ; BRCA1 ; WOMEN ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; nutrition ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; VARIANT ; BODY-SIZE ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; biomarker ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; ENZYME ; analysis ; GENOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPE ; HAPLOTYPES ; ENERGY-BALANCE ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; prospective ; ALLELE FREQUENCIES ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; ALLELE-FREQUENCY ; breast cancer susceptibility ; NONCARRIERS ; FATTY-ACID SYNTHASE ; CARBOXYLASE-ALPHA ; SYNTHESIS PATHWAY
    Abstract: A key fatty acid synthesis enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha(ACC-alpha), has been shown to be highly expressed in human breast cancer and other tumor types and also to specifically interact with the protein coded by one of two major breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1. We used a comprehensive haplotype analysis to examine the contribution of the ACC-alpha common genetic variation (allele frequency 〉 5%) to breast cancer in a case-control study (1,588 cases/2,600 controls) nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We identified 21 haplotypetagging polymorphisms efficiently capturing common variation within 325 kb of ACC-alpha and surrounding sequences using genotype data from the HapMap project and our resequencing data. We found an effect on overall risk of breast cancer in homozygous carriers of one common haplotype [odds ratio (OR), 1.74; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.03-2.94]. When the data were subdivided by menopausal status, we found statistical evidence of heterogeneity for two other common haplotypes (P value for heterogeneity = 0.016 and 0.045). In premenopausal women, the carriers of these haplotypes, compared with noncarriers, had an altered risk of breast cancer (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.92 and OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.04-1.76). These findings were not significant after adjustment for multiple testing and therefore should be considered as preliminary and evaluated in larger independent studies. However, they suggest a possible role of the ACC-alpha common sequence variants in susceptibility to breast cancer and encourage studies of other genes involved in fatty acid synthesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17372234
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  • 7
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; COHORT ; EXPOSURE ; HISTORY ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; HEALTH ; risk factors ; nutrition ; ATTRIBUTABLE RISKS ; education ; breast neoplasms ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; REPRODUCTIVE HISTORY ; SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES ; FRENCH WOMEN
    Abstract: The authors investigated the role of known risk factors in educational differences in breast cancer incidence. Analyses were based on the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition and included 242,095 women, 433 cases of in situ breast cancer, and 4,469 cases of invasive breast cancer. Reproductive history (age at first full-term pregnancy and parity), exposure to endogenous and exogenous hormones, height, and health behaviors were accounted for in the analyses. Relative indices of inequality (RII) for education were estimated using Cox regression models. A higher risk of invasive breast cancer was found among women with higher levels of education (RII = 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.37). This association was not observed among nulliparous women (RII = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.52). Inequalities in breast cancer incidence decreased substantially after adjusting for reproductive history (RII = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.98, 1.25), with most of the association being explained by age at first full-term pregnancy. Each other risk factor explained a small additional part of the inequalities in breast cancer incidence. Height accounted for most of the remaining differences in incidence. After adjusting for all known risk factors, the authors found no association between education level and risk of invasive breast cancer. Inequalities in incidence were more pronounced for in situ breast cancer, and those inequalities remained after adjustment for all known risk factors (RII = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.07, 2.41), especially among nulliparous women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21084553
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