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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; carcinoma ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; CARCINOMAS ; body mass index ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; WEIGHT ; BODY-SIZE ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; metabolic syndrome ; blood pressure ; SERUM-LEVELS ; prospective ; CORONARY HEART-DISEASE ; INCREASED RISK ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; C-PEPTIDE ; BODY-MASS ; endometrial neoplasms ; journals ; AGED NORWEGIAN MEN ; metabolic syndrome X
    Abstract: The authors examined the association between the metabolic syndrome and risk of incident endometnal and fatal uterine corpus cancer within a large prospective cohort study Approximately 290,000 women from Austria, Norway, and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements of height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and circulating levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and tnglycendes Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The metabolic syndrome was assessed as a composite z score, as the standardized sum of z scores for body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and tnglycendes. A total of 917 endonnetnal carcinomas and 129 fatal cancers were identified Increased risks of incident endometnal carcinoma and fatal uterine corpus cancer were seen for the metabolic syndrome factors combined, as well as for individual factors (except for cholesterol) The relative risk of endometnal carcinoma for the metabolic syndrome was 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1 28, 1 46) per 1-unit increment of z score The positive associations between metabolic syndrome factors (both individually and combined) and endometrial carcinoma were confined to the heaviest women. The association between the metabolic syndrome and endometnal carcinoma risk seems to go beyond the risk conferred by obesity alone, particularly in women with a high body mass index
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20219764
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; OBESITY ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; cholesterol ; METAANALYSIS ; VULVAR CANCER ; COMPLETENESS ; REGRESSION DILUTION ; COFACTORS ; MetS ; rare gynecological cancers
    Abstract: Background: Risk factors for rare gynecological cancers are largely unknown. Initial research has indicated that the metabolic syndrome (MetS) or individual components could play a role. Materials and methods: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project cohort includes 288 834 women. During an average follow-up of 11 years, 82 vulvar, 26 vaginal and 43 other rare gynecological cancers were identified. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated fitting Cox proportional hazards regression models for tertiles and standardized z-scores [with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation (SD) of 1] of body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurement of metabolic factors. Results: The MetS was associated with increased risk of vulvar [HR 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.41) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.07-3.25). Among separate MetS components, 1 SD increase in BMI was associated with overall risk (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.23-1.66), vulvar (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.11-1.69) and vaginal cancer (HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.30-2.46). Blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations were associated with increased risk of vulvar cancer (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.10-3.58 and HR 2.09, 95% CI 1.39-3.15, respectively). Conclusion: The results from this first prospective study on rare gynecological cancers suggest that the MetS and its individual components may play a role in the development of these tumors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20966183
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; carcinoma ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; score ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; cervical cancer ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; adenocarcinoma ; UTERINE CERVIX ; PROJECT ; metabolic syndrome ; COMPLETENESS ; REGRESSION DILUTION ; CONOR ; Squamous cell ; Metabolic factors
    Abstract: Background. Little is known about the association between metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer carcinogenesis. Material and methods. During mean follow-up of 11 years of the Me-Can cohort (N = 288,834) 425 invasive cervical cancer cases were diagnosed. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by the use of Cox proportional hazards regression models for quintiles and standardized z-scores (with a mean of 0 and a SD of 1) of BMI, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS score. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurements. Results. BMI (per 1SD increment) was associated with 12%, increase of cervical cancer risk, blood pressure with 25% and triglycerides with 39%, respectively. In models including all metabolic factors, the associations for blood pressure and triglycerides persisted. The metabolic syndrome (MetS) score was associated with 26% increased corrected risk of cervical cancer. Triglycerides were stronger associated with squamous cell carcinoma (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83) than with adenocarcinoma (0.92, 0.54-1.56). Among older women cholesterol (50-70 years 1.34; 1.00-1.81), triglycerides (50-70 years 1.49, 1.03-2.16 and 〉= 70 years 1.54, 1.09-2.19) and glucose (〉= 70 years 1.87, 1.13-3.11) were associated with increased cervical cancer risk. Conclusion. The presence of obesity, elevated blood pressure and triglycerides were associated with increased risk of cervical cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22330614
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