Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • case-control studies  (16)
Collection
Keywords
  • 1
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; proliferation ; tumor ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; RELEASE ; PATIENT ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; SOMATOSTATIN ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; IGF-I ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; cell proliferation ; development ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; GENOTYPE DATA ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; IGFBP3 ; insulin-like growth factor ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; SERUM-LEVELS
    Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates cell proliferation and can enhance the development of tumors in different organs. Epidemiologic studies have shown that an elevated level of circulating IGF-I is associated to increased risk of breast cancer as well as other cancers. Genetic variants affecting the release or biological action of growth hormone (GH), the main stimulator of IGF-I production, may predict circulating levels of IGF-I and have an effect on cancer risk. We tested this hypothesis with a large case-control study of 807 breast cancer patients and 1,588 matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We genotyped 22 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 genes involved in GH production and action (GHRH, GHRHR, SST, SSTR1-SSTR5, POU1F1, and GH1), and in parallel, we measured serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, its major binding protein, in samples of cases and controls. SST and SSTR2 polymorphisms showed weak but statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. SSTR5 polymorphisms were associated with IGF-I levels, whereas one polymorphism in GHRHR and one in POU1F1 were associated with IGFBP-3 levels. Our conclusion is that common genetic variation in the GH synthesis pathway, as measured by single nucleotide polymorphisms selected in the present study, is not a major determinant of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 circulating levels, and it does not play a major role in altering breast cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16214911
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; PATIENT ; RISK-FACTORS ; BINDING ; CYCLE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; ESTROGEN ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ADRENAL ANDROGENS ; ESTROGEN PLUS PROGESTIN ; FEMALE NOBLE RATS ; HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; HORMONE LEVELS ; ONE-YEAR PERIOD ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY
    Abstract: Background. Contrasting etiologic hypotheses about the role of endogenous sex steroids in breast cancer development among premenopausal women implicate ovarian androgen excess and progesterone deficiency, estrogen excess, estrogen and progesterone excess, and both an excess or lack of adrenal androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA] or its sulfate [DHEAS]) as risk factors. We conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort to examine associations among premenopausal serum concentrations of sex steroids and subsequent breast cancer risk. Methods: Levels of DHEAS, (Delta 4-)androstenedione, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in single prediagnostic serum samples from 370 premenopausal women who subsequently developed breast cancer (case patients) and from 726 matched cancer-free control subjects. Levels of progesterone, estrone, and estradiol were also measured for the 285 case patients and 555 matched control subjects who had provided information about the day of menstrual cycle at blood donation. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate relative risks of breast cancer by quartiles of hormone concentrations. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Increased risks of breast cancer were associated with elevated serum concentrations of testosterone (odds ratio [OR] for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16 to 2.57; P-trend =.01), androstenedione (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.569 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.32; P-trend =.01), and DHEAS (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.14; P-trend =.10) but not SHBG. Elevated serum progesterone concentrations were associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.98; P-trend =.06). The absolute risk of breast cancer for women younger than 40 followed up for 10 years was estimated at 2.6% for those in the highest quartile of serum testosterone versus 1.5% for those in the lowest quartile; for the highest and lowest quartiles of progesterone, these estimates were 1.7% and 2.6%, respectively. Breast cancer risk was not statistically significantly associated with serum levels
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15900045
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; INDEX ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; hormone ; PLASMA ; NUMBER ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; cancer risk ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; cholesterol ; LIPOPROTEIN ; LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN ; case-control studies ; ABNORMALITIES ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; CLUSTER ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; BODIES ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; RE ; INCREASE ; BODY-SIZE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; metabolic syndrome ; HORMONES ; prospective ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; SET ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX ; lipid ; HDL-CHOLESTEROL ; LOW-DENSITY ; SERUM-CHOLESTEROL
    Abstract: To clarify the role of metabolic factors in endometrial carcinogenesis, we conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), and examined the relation between prediagnostic plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and glucose, the metabolic syndrome (MetS; a cluster of metabolic factors) and endometrial cancer risk. Among pre- and postmenopausal women, 284 women developed endometrial cancer during follow-up. Using risk set sampling, 546 matched control subjects were selected. From conditional logistic regression models, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were inversely associated with risk body mass index (BMI)-adjusted relative risk (FR) for top versus bottom quartile 0.61 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.38-0.97), P-trend= 0.02). Glucose levels were positively associated with risk (BMI-adjusted RR top versus bottom quartile 1.69 (95% Cl 0.99-2.90), P-trend, = 0.03), which appeared stronger among postmenopausal women (BMI-adjusted RR top versus bottom tertile 2.61 (95% Cl 1.46-4.66), P-trend=0.0006, P-heterogeneity=0.13) and never-users of exogenous hormones (P-heterogeneity=0-005 for oral contraceptive (OC) use and 0.05 for hormone replacement therapy-use). The associations of HDL-C and glucose with risk were no longer statistically significant after further adjustment for obesity-related hormones. Plasma total cholesterol, Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides were not significantly related to overall risk. The presence of MetS was associated with risk (RR 2.12 (95% CI 1.51-2.97)), which increased with the number of MetS factors (P-trend=0.02). An increasing number of MetS factors other than waist circumference, however, was marginally significantly associated with risk only in women with waist circumference above the median (P-interaction=0-01). None of the associations differed significantly by fasting status. These findings suggest that metabolic abnormalities and obesity may act synergistically to increase endometrial cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17914105
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; INFECTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; REDUCED RISK ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; CARDIA ; EPIC ; ESOPHAGUS ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; STOMACH-CANCER ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; DIGESTIVE-TRACT ; gastric cancer ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; methods ; PROFILES ; prospective ; EVALUATE ; odds ratio ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; Helicobacter pylori ; cardia cancer ; socioeconomic position
    Abstract: Objectives To evaluate the association of socioeconomic position with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and stomach. Methods The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort comprises about 520000 participants mostly aged 35-70 years. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at recruitment. After an average follow-up of 6.5 years, 268 cases with adenocarcinoma of the stomach and 56 of the oesophagus were confirmed. We examined the effect of socioeconomic position on cancer risk by means of educational data and a computed Relative Index of Inequality (RII). In a nested case-control study, adjustment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was performed. Results Higher education was significantly associated with a reduced risk of gastric cancer [vs lowest level of education, hazard ratio (HR): 0.64, 95% Confidence intervals (CI): 0.43-0.981. This effect was more pronounced for cancer of the cardia (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20-0.89) as compared to non-cardia gastric cancer (HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.36-1.22). Additionally, the inverse association of educational level and gastric cancer was stronger for cases with intestinal (extreme categories, HR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.04-0.44) rather than diffuse histological subtype (extreme categories, HR: 0.71 95% CI: 0.37-1.40). In the nested case-control study, inverse but statistically non-significant associations were found after additional adjustment for H. pylori infection [highest vs lowest level of education: Odds ratio (OR) 0.53, 95% CI: 0.24-1.18]. Educational level was non-significantly, inversely associated with carcinoma of the oesophagus. Conclusion A higher socioeconomic position was associated with a reduced risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, which was strongest for cardia cancer or intestinal histological subtype, suggesting different risk profiles according to educational level. These effects appear to be explained only partially by established risk factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17227779
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MARKER ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; GLUCOSE ; nutrition ; BETA-CELL FUNCTION ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; INCREASE ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; USA ; prospective ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; HEMOGLOBIN ; TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; CHRONIC OXIDATIVE STRESS ; GLUCOSE TOXICITY ; RECTAL CANCERS ; SERUM C-PEPTIDE
    Abstract: Although large-scale prospective cohort studies have related hyperglycemia to increased risk of cancer overall, studies specifically on colorectal cancer have been generally small. We investigated the association between prediagnostic levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker for average glucose level in blood, and colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One thousand and twenty-six incident colorectal cancer cases (561 men and 465 women) and 1,026 matched controls were eligible for the study. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORS) adjusted for possible confounders. Increasing HbA1c percentages were statistically significantly associated with a mild increase in colorectal cancer risk in the whole population [OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01,1.19 for a 10% increase in HbA1c]. In women, increasing HbA1c percentages were associated with a statistically significant increase in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.32 for a 10% increase in HbA1c) and with a borderline statistically significant increase in rectum cancer (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.99,1.50 for a 10% increase in HbA1c). No significant association with cancer risk was observed in men. The results of the current study suggest a mild implication of hyperglycemia in colorectal cancer, which seems more important in women than in men, and more for cancer of the rectum than of the colon. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3108-15)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990751
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; BLOOD ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; VARIANTS ; ADENOMAS ; HEALTH ; colorectal cancer ; REDUCED RISK ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; GENOTYPES ; COLON-CANCER ; POPULATIONS ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; CALCIUM ; nutrition ; RECTAL-CANCER ; SERUM ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; colon cancer ; VARIANT ; interaction ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; GENOTYPE ; USA ; prospective ; rectal cancer ; cancer research ; colorectal ; vitamin D ; VITAMIN-D ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; D METABOLITES ; vitamin D receptor ; 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN-D ; RECTAL CANCERS ; Genetic ; VITAMIN ; CONFIDENCE ; CRC ; Logistic regression ; D-RECEPTOR ; DIETARY CALCIUM
    Abstract: Increased levels of vitamin D and calcium may play a protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. It has been suggested that these effects may be mediated by genetic variants of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the calcium sensing receptor (CASR). However, current epidemiologic evidence from European populations for a role of these genes in CRC risk is scarce. In addition, it is not clear whether these genes may modulate CRC risk independently or by interaction with blood vitamin D concentration wild-type bb, the BB genotype of the VDR BsmI polymorphism was associated with a reduced risk of CRC [RR, 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-0.98). The association was observed for colon cancer (RR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.45-0.95) but not rectal cancer (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.62-1.49). The Fok1 and CASR genotypes were not associated with CRC risk in thisand level of dietary calcium intake. A case-control study was conducted nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. CRC cases (1,248) were identified and matched to 1,248 control subjects. Genotyping for the VDR (BsmI: rs1544410; Fok1: rs2228570) and CASR (rs1801725) genes was done by Taqman, and serum vitamin D (25OHD) concentrations were measured. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio (RR). Compared with the study. No interactions were noted for any of the polymorphisms with serum 25OHD concentration or level of dietary calcium. These results confirm a role for the BsmI polymorphism of the VDR gene in CRC risk, independent of serum 25OHD concentration and dietary calcium intake. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(9):2485-91)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19706842
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; INDEX ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; FIBER ; cholesterol ; DIET ; case-control studies ; ALCOHOL ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; NUTRIENTS ; physical activity ; CELL CARCINOMA ; renal cell carcinoma ; case-control study ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; prospective studies ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; USA ; dietary intake ; prospective ; prospective study ; INCREASED RISK ; carbohydrate ; FOODS ; KIDNEY CANCER ; macronutrients ; VITAMIN
    Abstract: Previous case-control studies have suggested that a high intake of animal foods and its associated nutrients are associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma, although data from prospective studies are limited. We report here on the relationship between macronutrient intake and renal cell carcinoma incidence among 435,293 participants enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of dietary intake of fat, protein, carbohydrate, fiber and cholesterol and risk of renal cell carcinoma adjusted for age, sex, center, height, body mass index, physical activity, education, smoking, menopausal status, alcohol and energy intake. During an average 8.8 years of follow-up, 507 renal cell carcinoma cases occurred. Risk of renal cell carcinoma was not associated with macronutrient intake, including nutrients derived from animal sources. Our results indicate that macronutrient intake is not associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma in this cohort of European men and women. (C) 2009 UICC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19415751
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; cohort study ; HISTORY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; ENERGY ; AGE ; smoking ; cancer risk ; NETHERLANDS ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; pancreatic cancer ; CALIBRATION ; DIETARY HABITS ; case-control study ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; WEIGHT ; GENDER ; USA ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; WELL ; RESTRICTION
    Abstract: Many case-control studies have suggested that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with a lower risk or pancreatic cancer, whereas cohort studies do not support such an association. We examined the associations of the consumption of. fruits and vegetables and their main subgroups with pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is comprised of over 520,000 Subjects recruited from 10 European countries. The present study included 555 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases after an average follow-up of 8.9 years. Estimates of risk were obtained by Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age at recruitment, gender, and study center. and adjusted for total energy intake, weight, height, history of diabetes mellitus, and smoking status. Total consumption of fruit and vegetables, combined or separately, as well as subgroups of vegetables and fruits were unrelated to risk of pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios (95% CI) for the highest versus the lowest quartile were 0.92 (0.68-1.25) for total fruit and vegetables combined, 0.99 (0.73-1.33) for total vegetables, and 1.02 (0.77-1.36) for total fruits. Stratification by gender or smoking status, restriction to microscopically verified cases, and exclusion of the first 2 years of follow-up (lid not materially change the results. These results from a large European prospective cohort Suggest that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is not associated with decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. (C) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19107929
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; PROSTATE ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; TIME ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; HEALTH ; AGE ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; CALCIUM ; EPIC ; nutrition ; HETEROGENEITY ; SERUM ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; USA ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; prostatic neoplasms ; vitamin D ; D METABOLITES ; D DEFICIENCY ; 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN-D ; 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN-D ; 25-hydroxyvitamin D ; SUBSEQUENT DEVELOPMENT ; D-RECEPTOR ; 25-hydroxyvitamin D 2 ; D-BINDING PROTEIN
    Abstract: Results from the majority of studies show little association between circulating concentrations of vitamin D and prostate cancer risk, a finding that has not been demonstrated in a wider European population, however. The authors examined whether vitamin D concentrations were associated with prostate cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (1994-2000). Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured in 652 prostate cancer cases matched to 752 controls from 7 European countries after a median follow-up time of 4.1 years. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios for prostate cancer risk in relation to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D after standardizing for month of blood collection and adjusting for covariates. No significant association was found between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of prostate cancer (highest vs. lowest quintile: odds ratio = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 0.88, 1.88; P for trend = 0.188). Subgroup analyses showed no significant heterogeneity by cancer stage or grade, age at diagnosis, body mass index, time from blood collection to diagnosis, or calcium intake. In summary, the results of this large nested case-control study provide no evidence in support of a protective effect of circulating concentrations of vitamin D on the risk of prostate cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19359375
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; PROSTATE ; SUPPORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; case-control studies ; nutrition ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; HETEROGENEITY ; isoflavones ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; GENISTEIN CONTENT ; prospective ; ENTEROLACTONE ; phytoestrogens ; lignan ; DAIDZEIN ; genistein ; JAPANESE MEN ; RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; isoflavone ; SOY PRODUCT
    Abstract: We examined plasma concentrations of phyto-oestrogens in relation to risk for subsequent prostate cancer in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Concentrations of isoflavones genistein, daidzein and equol, and that of lignans enterolactone and enterodiol, were measured in plasma samples for 950 prostate cancer cases and 1042 matched control participants. Relative risks (RRs) for prostate cancer in relation to plasma concentrations of these phyto-oestrogens were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Higher plasma concentrations of genistein were associated with lower risk of prostate cancer: RR among men in the highest vs the lowest fifth, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.96, P trend = 0.03). After adjustment for potential confounders this RR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.54-1.00, P trend = 0.05). No statistically significant associations were observed for circulating concentrations of daidzein, equol, enterolactone or enterodiol in relation to overall risk for prostate cancer. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in these results by age at blood collection or country of recruitment, nor by cancer stage or grade. These results suggest that higher concentrations of circulating genistein may reduce the risk of prostate cancer but do not support an association with plasma lignans. British Journal of Cancer (2009) 100, 1817-1823. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605073 www.bjcancer.com Published online 12 May 2009 (C) 2009 Cancer Research UK
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19436304
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...