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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; etiology ; risk factors ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; DIETARY FACTORS ; ASSOCIATIONS ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM ; non-Hodgkin lymphoma ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; methods ; function ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; HODGKIN LYMPHOMA ; B-CELL ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; DRINKING-WATER NITRATE
    Abstract: Introduction Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant diseases of cells of the immune system. The best-established risk factors are related to dys-regulation of immune function, and evidence suggests that factors such as dietary or lifestyle habits may be involved in the etiology. Material and methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 849 lymphoma cases were identified in a median follow-up period of 6.4 years. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of lymphomas overall and subentities. Results There was no overall association between total fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphoma [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-1.15 comparing highest with lowest quartile]. However, the risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) tended to be lower in participants with a high intake of total vegetables (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.23-1.02). Conclusion In this large prospective study, an inverse associations between fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lymphomas overall could not be confirmed. Associations with lymphoma subentities such as DLBCL warrant further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17443415
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; AGENTS ; CELL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; neoplasms ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; incidence ; RISK ; INFECTION ; MECHANISM ; primary ; RISK-FACTORS ; mechanisms ; T cell ; T-CELL ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; CARE ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; etiology ; MEN ; risk factors ; leukemia ; Jun ; diabetes ; ABNORMALITIES ; INFECTIONS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; immunosuppression ; non-hodgkin's lymphoma ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; VIRAL-INFECTION ; insulin ; MELLITUS ; AGENT ; AUTOIMMUNITY ; multiple myeloma ; DISORDERS ; MEDICAL HISTORY ; INCREASE ; T-CELL LYMPHOMA ; prospective studies ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; metabolic syndrome ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; B-CELL ; ENGLAND ; ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS ; host ; INCREASES ; viral ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; neoplasm ; INTERLEUKIN-6 GENE
    Abstract: Background Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising from the lymphopoietic system including a wide range of subtypes of either B-cell or T-cell lymphomas. The few established risk factors for the development of these neoplasms include viral infections and immunological abnormalities, but their etiology remains largely unknown. Evidence suggests that certain medical conditions may be linked, through immunosuppression, to the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple myeloma is a neoplasm of plasma cells that accounts for approximately 15% of lymphopoietic cancers. Increases in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the past implicate environmental factors as potential causal agents. Design and Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 1,213 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma (594 men; 619 women) were identified during a follow-up of 8.5 years. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between self-reported diabetes, diagnosed after 30 years of age, and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall and multiple myeloma and various lymphoma subtypes. Results We found no association between a personal history of diabetes and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall in men (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.89-1.84), in women (HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.41-1.24), or in men and women combined (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.80-1.47). Among the B-non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes, we observed a statistically significant increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (HR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.04-3.86) in men, but not in women (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33-3.43). Conclusions This prospective study did not provide evidence for a role of self-reported diabetes in the etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall or multiple myeloma. We found an increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia among men with diabetes, but not among women. We hypothesize that diabetes may not play a causal role in the etiology of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, though the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of both disorders may include shared genetic, host and/or environmental susceptibility factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18443270
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; RECRUITMENT ; nutrition ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; Epidemiologic studies
    Abstract: Background: Previous epidemiologic studies found inconsistent results for the association between red meat intake, nitrosamines [NDMA: N-nitrosodimethylamine, and ENOC (endogenous nitroso compounds)], and the risk of bladder cancer. We investigated the association between red meat consumption, dietary nitrosamines, and heme iron and the risk of bladder cancer among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Data on food consumption and complete follow-up for cancer occurrence were available for a total of 481,419 participants, recruited in 10 European countries. Estimates of HRs were obtained by proportional hazard models, stratified by age at recruitment, gender, and study center and adjusted for total energy intake, smoking status, lifetime intensity of smoking, duration of smoking, educational level, and BMI. Results: After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1,001 participants were diagnosed with bladder cancer. We found no overall association between intake of red meat (log(2) HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.99-1.13), nitrosamines (log(2) HR: 1.09; 95% CI: 0.92-1.30 and HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.92-1.05 for ENOC and NDMA, respectively) or heme iron (log(2) HR: 1.05; 95 CI: 0.99-1.12) and bladder cancer risk. The associations did not vary by sex, high-versus low-risk bladder cancers, smoking status, or occupation (high vs. low risk). Conclusions: Our findings do not support an effect of red meat intake, nitrosamines (endogenous or exogenous), or heme iron intake on bladder cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21239687
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; PROSTATE ; SUPPORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; case-control studies ; nutrition ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; HETEROGENEITY ; isoflavones ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; GENISTEIN CONTENT ; prospective ; ENTEROLACTONE ; phytoestrogens ; lignan ; DAIDZEIN ; genistein ; JAPANESE MEN ; RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; isoflavone ; SOY PRODUCT
    Abstract: We examined plasma concentrations of phyto-oestrogens in relation to risk for subsequent prostate cancer in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Concentrations of isoflavones genistein, daidzein and equol, and that of lignans enterolactone and enterodiol, were measured in plasma samples for 950 prostate cancer cases and 1042 matched control participants. Relative risks (RRs) for prostate cancer in relation to plasma concentrations of these phyto-oestrogens were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Higher plasma concentrations of genistein were associated with lower risk of prostate cancer: RR among men in the highest vs the lowest fifth, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.96, P trend = 0.03). After adjustment for potential confounders this RR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.54-1.00, P trend = 0.05). No statistically significant associations were observed for circulating concentrations of daidzein, equol, enterolactone or enterodiol in relation to overall risk for prostate cancer. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in these results by age at blood collection or country of recruitment, nor by cancer stage or grade. These results suggest that higher concentrations of circulating genistein may reduce the risk of prostate cancer but do not support an association with plasma lignans. British Journal of Cancer (2009) 100, 1817-1823. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605073 www.bjcancer.com Published online 12 May 2009 (C) 2009 Cancer Research UK
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19436304
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  • 5
    Keywords: LUNG-CANCER ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK-FACTORS ; PLASMA ; MARKERS ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; nutrition ; KIDNEY CANCER ; MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSAY ; FOLATE
    Abstract: Background The etiology of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is only partially understood, but a metabolic component appears likely. We investigated biomarkers of one-carbon metabolism and RCC onset and survival. Methods The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) recruited 385 747 participants with blood samples between 1992 and 2000, and this analysis included 556 RCC case-control pairs. A subsequent replication study included 144 case-control pairs nested within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS). Plasma concentrations of vitamin B2, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, methionine and homocysteine were measured in prediagnostic samples and evaluated with respect to RCC risk using conditional and unconditional logistic regression models, and to all-cause mortality in RCC cases using Cox regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results EPIC participants with higher plasma concentrations of vitamin B6 had lower risk of RCC, the odds ratio comparing the 4th and 1st quartiles (OR4vs1) being 0.40 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.28 to 0.57, P-trend 〈 .001. We found similar results after adjusting for potential confounders (adjusted P-trend 〈 .001). In survival analysis, the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality in RCC cases when comparing the 4th and 1st quartiles (HR4vs1) of vitamin B6 was 0.57 (95% CI = 0.37 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001). Subsequent replication of these associations within the MCCS yielded very similar results for both RCC risk (OR4vs1 = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.23 to 0.99, P-trend = .07) and all-cause mortality (HR4vs1 = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.27 to 1.17, P-trend = .02). No association was evident for the other measured biomarkers. Conclusion Study participants with higher circulating concentrations of vitamin B6 had lower risk of RCC and improved survival following diagnosis in two independent cohorts.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25376861
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; REDUCED RISK ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; NETHERLANDS ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; BETA-CAROTENE ; colon cancer ; EPIC PROJECT ; pooled analysis ; USA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; colorectal ; RECTAL CANCERS ; CRC
    Abstract: Background: A high consumption of fruit and vegetables is possibly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the findings to date are inconsistent. Objective: We examined the relation between self-reported usual consumption of fruit and vegetables and the incidence of CRC. Design: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 452,755 subjects (131,985 men and 320,770 women) completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-2000 and were followed up for cancer incidence and mortality until 2006. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results: After an average follow-up of 8.8 y, 2,819 incident CRC cases were reported. Consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with CRC in a comparison of the highest with the lowest EPIC-wide quintile of consumption (HR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.00; P for trend 0.04), particularly with colon cancer risk (HR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63, 0.91; P for trend 〈 0.01). Only after exclusion of the first 2 y of follow-up were these findings corroborated by calibrated continuous analyses for a 100-g increase in consumption: HRs of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.00; P 0.04) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.89, 0.99; P = 0.02), respectively. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and CRC risk was inverse in never and former smokers, but positive in current smokers. This modifying effect was found for fruit and vegetables combined and for vegetables alone (P for interaction, 0.01 for both). Conclusions: These findings suggest that a high consumption of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of CRC, especially of colon cancer. This effect may depend on smoking status. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:1441-52
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19339391
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  • 7
    Keywords: MODEL ; THERAPY ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; RISK ; VALIDITY ; nutrition ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; ENDOCRINE ; METAANALYSIS ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; androgens ; FREE TESTOSTERONE
    Abstract: Prediagnostic endogenous sex steroid hormone levels have well established associations with overall risk of breast cancer. While evidence toward the existence of distinct subtypes of breast cancer accumulates, few studies have investigated the associations of sex steroid hormone levels with risk of hormone receptor [estrogen receptor (ER) and/or progesterone receptor (PR)] defined breast cancer. In a case-control study nested within the EPIC cohort (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition), estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured in prediagnostic serum samples from postmenopausal women not using hormone replacement therapy at blood donation. A total of 554 women who developed invasive breast cancer with information on receptor status were matched with 821 control subjects. Conditional logistic regression models estimated breast cancer risk with hormone concentrations according to hormone receptor status of the tumor. Sex steroid hormones were associated with risks of not only ER+PR+ breast cancer [estradiol OR for highest vs. lowest tertile = 2.91 (95% CI: 1.62-5.23), P(trend) 0.002; testosterone OR = 2.27 (95% CI: 1.35-3.81), P(trend) 0.002] but also of ER-PR- breast cancer [estradiol OR = 2.11 (95% CI: 1.00-4.46), P(trend) = 0.05; testosterone OR = 2.06 (95% CI: 0.95-4.46), P(trend) = 0.03], with associations appearing somewhat stronger in the receptor-positive disease. Serum androgens and estrogens are associated with risks of both hormone receptor-negative as well as receptor-positive breast tumors. Further research is needed to establish through which molecular pathways, and during which evolutionary stages of development, androgens and estrogens can promote the occurrence of both receptor-positive and -negative clinical breast tumors.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21813404
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