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  • polymorphism  (22)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; carcinoma ; neoplasms ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; TUMORS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; SNP ; mass spectrometry ; MELANOMA ; MASS-SPECTROMETRY ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; MUTATIONS ; Jun ; MALIGNANT-MELANOMA ; HEALTHY ; BRAF ; MASSES ; RE ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; TESTS ; KRAS ; LINKAGE PHASE ; LMP ; low malignant potential
    Abstract: Objective. The object of this study was to test the hypothesis that BRAF is a low-risk susceptibility gene for low malignant potential (LMP) ovarian cancer. A recent study of the relationship between BRAF polymorphisms and malignant melanoma identified strong linkage disequilibrium across the BRAF gene with one of the three most common haplotypes (haplotype C) having a population attributable risk of approximately 1.6%. We therefore hypothesized that the same BRAF haplotype may confer an increased risk of serous ovarian tumors of low malignant potential. Methods. We genotyped 383 cases of LMP ovarian cancer, including 234 of serous histology, and 987 controls for seven SNPs, representative of the most common BRAF gene haplotypes, using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Results. Haplotype information was obtained for 369 LMP ovarian cancer cases and 983 healthy controls. None of the haplotypes were found to be associated with risk of LMP ovarian cancer (OR for haplotype C 0.81, 95% Cl 0.54-1.22), or with the risk of serous LMP ovarian cancer (OR for haplotype C 0.90, 95% CI = 0.56- 1.45). Conclusion. We found no evidence to suggest that BRAF is a low-risk LMP ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. (c) 2005 Published by Elsevier Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15904951
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; TRANSDUCTION ; PATIENT ; ACTIVATION ; MECHANISM ; IMPACT ; CARCINOGENESIS ; signal transduction ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; MUTATION ; SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION ; cancer risk ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; BRCA2 ; INCREASE ; analysis ; TESTS ; USA ; BINDING DOMAIN ; CANCER-RISK ; EPITHELIAL OVARIAN-CANCER ; KINASE-ANCHORING PROTEINS
    Abstract: Data from several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which are key components of signal transduction, contribute to carcinogenesis. To evaluate the impact of AKAP variants on breast cancer risk, we genotyped six nonsynonymous sing le-nucleotide polymorphisms that were predicted to be deleterious and found two (M4631, 1389G〉T and N2792S, 8375A〉G) to be associated with an allele dose-dependent increase in risk of familial breast cancer in a German population. We extended the analysis of AKAP9 M4631, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with AKAP9 N2792S, to 9523 breast cancer patients and 13770 healthy control subjects from seven independent European and Australian breast cancer studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. The collaborative analysis confirmed the association of M4631 with increased breast cancer risk. Among all breast cancer patients, the combined adjusted odds ratio (OR) of breast cancer for individuals homozygous for the rare allele TT (frequency = 0.19) compared with GG homozygotes was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CL] = 1.08 to 1.27, P =.0003), and the OR for TT homozygotes plus GT heterozygotes compared with GG homozygotes was 1.10 (95% Cl = 1.04 to 1.17, P=.001). Among the combined subset of 2795 familial breast cancer patients, the respective ORs were 1.27 (95% Cl = 1.12 to 1.45, P =.0003) and 1.16 (95% Cl = 1.06 to 1.27, P =.001)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18334708
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; POPULATION ; RISK ; SITE ; SITES ; GENE ; GENES ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; HEALTH ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; REPLICATION ; glycosylation ; ONCOLOGY ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; biomarker ; CANCER-RISK ; Genetic ; single nucleotide
    Abstract: Aberrant glycosylation is a well-described hallmark of cancer. In a previous ovarian cancer case control study that examined polymorphisms in 26 glycosylation-associated genes, we found strong statistical evidence (P = 0.00017) that women who inherited two copies of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, GALNT1, had decreased ovarian cancer risk. The current study attempted to replicate this observation. The GALNT1 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs17647532 was genotyped in 6,965 cases and 8,377 controls from 14 studies forming the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. The fixed effects estimate per rs17647532 allele was null (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.07). When a recessive model was fit, the results were unchanged. Test for hetero geneity of the odds ratios revealed consistency across the 14 replication sites but significant differences compared with the original study population (P = 0.03). This study underscores the need for replication of putative findings in genetic association studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(2); 600-4. (C) 2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20142253
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  • 4
    Keywords: TUMORS ; polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; BRCA1 ; WOMEN ; HETEROZYGOSITY ; MUTATIONS ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; LOCUS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association studies ; Meiosis ; risk of ovarian cancer
    Abstract: Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines; AIFM2, AKTIP, AXIN2, CASP5, FILIP1L, RBBP8, RGC32, RUVBL1 and STAG3. Sixty-three tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in these genes were genotyped in 1,799 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 3,045 controls to look for associations with disease risk. Two SNPs in RUVBL1, rs13063604 and rs7650365, were associated with increased risk of serous ovarian cancer [HetOR = 1.42 (1.15-1.74) and the HomOR = 1.63 (1.10-1.42), p-trend = 0.0002] and [HetOR = 0.97 (0.80-1.17), HomOR = 0.74 (0.58-0.93), p-trend = 0.009], respectively. We genotyped rs13063604 and rs7650365 in an additional 4,590 cases and 6,031 controls from ten sites from the United States, Europe and Australia; however, neither SNP was significant in Stage 2. We also evaluated the potential role of tSNPs in these nine genes in ovarian cancer development by testing for allele-specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 286 primary ovarian tumours. We found frequent LOH for tSNPs in AXIN2, AKTIP and RGC32 (64, 46 and 34%, respectively) and one SNP, rs1637001, in STAG3 showed significant allele-specific LOH with loss of the common allele in 94% of informative tumours (p = 0.015). Array comparative genomic hybridisation indicated that this nonrandom allelic imbalance was due to amplification of the rare allele. In conclusion, we show evidence for the involvement of a common allele of STAG3 in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20635389
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMMON ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; primary ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; STAGE ; PATTERNS ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; SNP ; DATABASE ; Jun ; POPULATIONS ; familial risk ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; SINGLE ; AGGREGATION ; VARIANT ; ALLELE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; ALLELES ; LEVEL ; familial aggregation ; single-nucleotide ; UNIT ; ENGLAND ; LOCI ; CHEK2-ASTERISK-1100DELC ; breast cancer susceptibility ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; GENETIC-SUSCEPTIBILITY ; GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTOR-2
    Abstract: Breast cancer exhibits familial aggregation, consistent with variation in genetic susceptibility to the disease. Known susceptibility genes account for less than 25% of the familial risk of breast cancer, and the residual genetic variance is likely to be due to variants conferring more moderate risks. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study in 4,398 breast cancer cases and 4,316 controls, followed by a third stage in which 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for confirmation in 21,860 cases and 22,578 controls from 22 studies. We used 227,876 SNPs that were estimated to correlate with 77% of known common SNPs in Europeans at r(2) 〉 0.5. SNPs in five novel independent loci exhibited strong and consistent evidence of association with breast cancer (P 〈 10(-7)). Four of these contain plausible causative genes (FGFR2, TNRC9, MAP3K1 and LSP1). At the second stage, 1,792 SNPs were significant at the P 〈 0.05 level compared with an estimated 1,343 that would be expected by chance, indicating that many additional common susceptibility alleles may be identifiable by this approach
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17529967
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; neoplasms ; RISK ; RISKS ; SAMPLE ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; REDUCED RISK ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; CANCER RISKS ; REPLICATION ; GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; HETEROGENEITY ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; BRCA2 ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; analysis ; USA ; CANDIDATE ; CANCER-RISK ; COMMON VARIANT ; CASP8 GENE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; CONSORTIUM ; NUCLEOTIDE
    Abstract: The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H (rs144848) in BRCA2, rs2854344 in intron 17 of RB1, rs2811712 5' flanking CDKN2A, rs523349 in the 3' UTR of SRD5A2, D302H (rs1045485) in CASP8 and L10P (rs1982073) in TGFB1. Fourteen studies genotyped 4,624 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 8,113 controls of white non-Hispanic origin. A marginally significant association was found for RB1 when all studies were included [ordinal odds ratio (OR) 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-1.00) p = 0.041 and dominant OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.76-0.98) p = 0.025]; when the studies that originally suggested an association were excluded, the result was suggestive although no longer statistically significant (ordinal OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). This SNP has also been shown to have an association with decreased risk in breast cancer. There was a suggestion of an association for AURKA, when one study that caused significant study heterogeneity was excluded [ordinal OR 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.20) p = 0.027; dominant OR 1.12 (95% CI 1.01-1.24) p = 0.03]. The other 5 SNPs in BRCA2, CDKN2A, SRD5A2, CASP8 and TGFB1 showed no association with ovarian cancer risk; given the large sample size, these results can also be considered to be informative. These null results for SNPs identified from relatively large initial studies shows the importance of replicating associations by a consortium approach. (C) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18431743
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMMON ; HISTORY ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; FAMILY ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; FREQUENCIES ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; early detection ; IDENTIFICATION ; BRCA1 ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; MUTATION ; SNP ; MUTATIONS ; POPULATIONS ; genetic polymorphism ; case-control studies ; GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; DNA-REPAIR GENES ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; case-control study ; review ; FAMILIES ; development ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; USA ; INCREASED RISK ; CANCERS ; EXTENT ; FUNCTIONAL POLYMORPHISM ; Genetic ; PROPORTION ; FEDERATION ; INTERNATIONAL HAPMAP PROJECT ; INVASIVE OVARIAN ; PROGESTERONE-RECEPTOR GENE
    Abstract: The value of identifying women with an inherited predisposition to epithelial ovarian cancer has become readily apparent with the identification of the BRCA1, and BRCA2 genes. Women who inherit a deleterious mutation in either of these genes have a very high lifetime risk of ovarian cancer (10-60%) and to some extent, increased risks of fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer. These highly lethal cancers are almost completely prevented by prophylactic salpingoophorectomy. BRCA1/2 mutation testing has become the accepted standard of care in families with a strong history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. This approach has the potential to reduce ovarian cancer mortality by about 10%. Although the ability to perform genetic testing for BRCA1 and 2 represents a significant clinical advance, the frequency of mutations in these high penetrance ovarian cancer susceptibility genes is low in most populations. There is evidence to suggest that ovarian cancer susceptibility might be affected by common low penetrance genetic polymorphisms like it was shown for several common disorders like diabetes or breast cancer. Although such polymorphisms would increase risk to a lesser degree, they could contribute to the development of a greater proportion of ovarian cancers by virtue of their higher frequencies in the population. It has been shown that the most powerful approach to studying low penetrance genes is an association study rather than a linkage study design. This review describes the efforts that have been made in this field by individual case-control studies and through multi-center collaborations as part of international consortia such as the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19383379
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  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; CELL ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; DIFFERENTIATION ; TUMORS ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; MARKER ; REDUCTION ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; BRCA1 ; WOMEN ; MUTATION ; SNP ; MARKERS ; cancer risk ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; PROGENITOR CELLS ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; PROJECT ; MORPHOGENESIS ; ER ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; SINGLE ; case control study ; case-control study ; BRCA2 ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR ; VARIANT ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; ESTROGEN ; biomarker ; estrogen receptor ; pooled analysis ; USA ; CANCER-RISK ; CONSORTIUM ; tumor suppressor ; 3 ; Genetic ; TRANSCRIPTION-FACTOR ; BRCA1 and BRCA2 ; GATA3 ; LUMINAL CELL FATE
    Abstract: GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) is a transcription factor that is crucial to mammary gland morphogenesis and differentiation of progenitor cells, and has been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function. The rs570613 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in intron 4 of GATA3 was previously found to be associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project and in pooled analysis of two case-control studies from Norway and Poland (P (trend) = 0.004), with some evidence for a stronger association with estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours [Garcia-Closas M et al. (2007) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 16:2269-2275]. We genotyped GATA3 rs570613 in 6,388 cases and 4,995 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and 5,617 BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). We found no association between this SNP and breast cancer risk in BCAC cases overall (ORper-allele = 1.00, 95% CI 0.94-1.05), in ER negative BCAC cases (ORper-allele = 1.02, 95% CI 0.91-1.13), in BRCA1 mutation carriers RRper-allele = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90-1.09) or BRCA2 mutation carriers (RRper-allele = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80-1.07). We conclude that there is no evidence that either GATA3 rs570613, or any variant in strong linkage disequilibrium with it, is associated with breast cancer risk in women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19082709
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; GENE ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; BREAST ; HEALTH ; MUTATIONS ; ENVELOPE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; SYNE-1 ; CANDIDATE SNPS ; single nucleotide
    Abstract: We genotyped 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) region in three population-based case-control studies of epithelial ovarian cancer conducted in the United States, comprising a total of 1,128 and 1,866 non-Hispanic white invasive cases and controls, respectively. A SNP 19 kb downstream of ESR1. (rs2295190, G-to-T change) was associated with invasive ovarian cancer risk, with a per-T-allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.44, P = 0.0061. rs2295190 is a nonsynonymous coding SNP in a neighboring gene called spectrin repeat containing, nuclear envelope I (SYNE1), which is involved in nuclear organization and structural integrity, function of the Golgi apparatus, and cytokinesis. An isoform encoded by SYNE1 has been reported to be down-regulated in ovarian and other cancers. rs2295190 was genotyped in an additional 12 Studies through the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, with 5,279 invasive epithelial cases and 7,450 controls. The per-T-allele OR for this 12-study set was 1.09 (95% CI, 1.02-1.17; P = 0.017). Results for the serous subtype in the 15 combined studies were similar to those overall (n = 3,545; OR, 1.09; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.18; P = 0.025), and our findings were strongest for the mucinous subtype (n = 447; OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.11-1.58; P = 0.002). No association was observed for the endometrioid Subtype. In an additional analysis of 1,459 borderline ovarian cancer cases and 7,370 controls, rs2295190 was not associated with risk. These data provide suggestive evidence that the rs2295190 T allele, or another allele in linkage disequilibrium with it, may be associated with increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 190); 245-50. (C) 2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20056644
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  • 10
    Keywords: LUNG-CANCER ; polymorphism ; PROGRESSION ; AMPLIFICATION ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; CELL-DIVISION ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCI ; RISK LOCI ; TACC2
    Abstract: Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 x 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 x 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 x 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 x 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24927736
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