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  • prevention  (18)
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; HISTORY ; RISK ; REDUCTION ; colon ; cancer prevention ; prevention ; HEALTH ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COST-EFFECTIVENESS ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; INCREASE ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; case control studies ; cancer research ; ENDOSCOPY ; FLEXIBLE SIGMOIDOSCOPY ; colorectal ; ASYMPTOMATIC ADULTS ; LINE FINDINGS ; POLYPECTOMY ; SCREENING TRIAL
    Abstract: We aimed to estimate the proportions of colorectal cancer cases that might be prevented by sigmoidoscopy compared with colonoscopy among women and men. In a population-based case control study conducted in Germany, 540 cases with a first diagnosis of primary colorectal cancer and 614 controls matched for age, sex, and county of residence were recruited. A detailed lifetime history of endoscopic examinations of the large bowel was obtained by standardized personal interviews, validated by medical records, and compared between cases and controls, paying particular attention to location of colorectal cancer and sex differences. Overall, 39%, 77%, and 64% of proximal, distal, and total colorectal cancer cases were estimated to be preventable by colonoscopy. The estimated proportion of total colorectal cancer cases preventable by sigmoidoscopy was 45% among both women and men, assuming that sigmoidoscopy reaches the junction of the descending and sigmoid colon only and findings of distal polyps are not followed by colonoscopy. Assuming that sigmoidoscopy reaches the splenic flexure and colonoscopy is done after detection of distal polyps, estimated proportions of total colorectal cancer preventable by sigmoidoscopy increase to 50% and 55% (73% and 91% of total colorectal cancer preventable by primary colonoscopy) among women and men, respectively. We conclude that colonoscopy provides strong protection against colorectal cancer among both women and men. The proportion of this protection achieved by sigmoidoscopy with follow-up colonoscopy in case of distal polyps may be larger than anticipated. Among men, this regimen may be almost as effective as colonoscopy, at least at previous performance levels of colonoscopy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17337649
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; screening ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; prevention ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; GUIDELINES ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; aging ; LEVEL ; ENGLAND
    Abstract: We assessed incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) at various ages among women and men in 38 European countries. The ages at which defined levels of incidence and mortality were reached varied between 9 and 17 years between countries. This variation requires consideration in the definition of screening guidelines
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18628760
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  • 3
    Keywords: FOLLOW-UP ; RISK ; prevention ; UNITED-STATES ; FLEXIBLE SIGMOIDOSCOPY ; OCCULT BLOOD-TEST ; SIDED COLON-CANCER ; POPULATION-BASED-ANALYSIS ; LOWER ENDOSCOPY ; TELEMARK POLYP
    Abstract: Objectives To review, summarise, and compare the evidence for effectiveness of screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy in the prevention of colorectal cancer occurrence and deaths. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies. Data sources PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Two investigators independently extracted characteristics and results of identified studies and performed standardised quality ratings. Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials and observational studies in English on the impact of screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in the general population at average risk. Results For screening sigmoidoscopy, four randomised controlled trials and 10 observational studies were identified that consistently found a major reduction in distal but not proximal colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Summary estimates of reduction in distal colorectal cancer incidence and mortality were 31% (95% confidence intervals 26% to 37%) and 46% (33% to 57%) in intention to screen analysis, 42% (29% to 53%) and 61% (27% to 79%) in per protocol analysis of randomised controlled trials, and 64% (50% to 74%) and 66% (38% to 81%) in observational studies. For screening colonoscopy, evidence was restricted to six observational studies, the results of which suggest tentatively an even stronger reduction in distal colorectal cancer incidence and mortality, along with a significant reduction in mortality from cancer of the proximal colon. Indirect comparisons of results of observational studies on screening sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy suggest a 40% to 60% lower risk of incident colorectal cancer and death from colorectal cancer after screening colonoscopy even though this incremental risk reduction was statistically significant for deaths from cancer of the proximal colon only. Conclusions Compelling and consistent evidence from randomised controlled trials and observational studies suggests that screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy prevent most deaths from distal colorectal cancer. Observational studies suggest that colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy decreases mortality from cancer of the proximal colon. This added value should be examined in further research and weighed against the higher costs, discomfort, complication rates, capacities needed, and possible differences in compliance.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; screening ; TOOL ; HISTORY ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; PATIENT ; REDUCTION ; colon ; prevention ; AGE ; colorectal cancer ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COST-EFFECTIVENESS ; case-control studies ; FEASIBILITY ; RELATIVE RISK ; RECTAL-CANCER ; case-control study ; RE ; INCREASE ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; odds ratio ; population-based ; AVERAGE-RISK ; ENDOSCOPY ; FLEXIBLE SIGMOIDOSCOPY ; SERVICES TASK-FORCE
    Abstract: Background and aims: Screening colonoscopy is thought to be a powerful and cost-effective tool to reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Whether and when colonoscopy with negative findings has to be repeated is not well defined. The aim of this study was to assess the long term risk of clinically manifest colorectal cancer among subjects with negative findings at colonoscopy. Patients: 380 cases and 485 controls participating in a population based case-control study in Germany. Methods: Detailed history and results of previous colonoscopies were obtained by interview and from medical records. Adjusted relative risks of colorectal cancer among subjects with a previous negative colonoscopy compared with those without previous colonoscopy were estimated according to time since colonoscopy. Results: Subjects with previous negative colonoscopy had a 74% lower risk of colorectal cancer than those without previous colonoscopy (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.26 (95% confidence interval, 0.16 to 0.40)). This low risk was seen even if the colonoscopy had been done up to 20 or more years previously. Particularly low risks were seen for sigma cancer (aOR = 0.13 (0.04 to 0.43)) and for rectal cancer (aOR = 0.19 (0.09 to 0.39)), and after a negative screening colonoscopy at ages 55 to 64 (aOR = 0.17 (0.08 to 0.39)) and older (aOR = 0.21 (0.10 to 0.41)). Conclusions: Subjects with negative findings at colonoscopy are at very low risk of colorectal cancer and might not need to undergo repeat colonoscopy for 20 years or more, if at all. The possibility of extending screening intervals to 20 years or more might reduce complications and increase the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy based screening programmes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16469791
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; COHORT ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; DRUG ; IMPACT ; REDUCTION ; ASSOCIATION ; TRIAL ; TRIALS ; ADENOMAS ; prevention ; HEALTH ; colorectal cancer ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; POPULATIONS ; case-control studies ; aspirin ; NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ; chemoprevention ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; SINGLE ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; METAANALYSIS ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; USA ; prospective ; DRUGS ; odds ratio ; colorectal ; cardiovascular disease ; LONG-TERM USE ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; statins
    Abstract: Recent research has drawn attention to protective effects of statins on colorectal cancer (CRC) and possible joint effects with other drugs. Because statins are often administered in combination With low-dose aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, the aim of our study was to investigate individual and combined effects of statins and low-dose aspirin on CRC risk. We assessed use of statins and low-dose aspirin in 540 cases with histologically confirmed incident CRC and 614 control subjects in a populations based case-control study in Germany. Multiple logistic regression. was used to estimate the impact of regular use of either low-dose aspirin or statins, and of both drugs combined on CRC risk. We found modest risk reduction of CRC for regular use of low-dose aspirin (adjusted odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.551.07) and a stronger association with regular use of statins (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.43-0.99) or use of both drugs (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.36-1.10). Combined use of low-dose aspirin and statins was associated with risk reduction by 62% after 5 or more years (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.97). Combinational chemoprevention with low-dose aspirin and statins might provide stronger risk reduction than either of the single drugs after at least 5 years use, but confirmation is needed, preferably in prospective cohort studies and eventually by randomized controlled trials. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17487832
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; HISTORY ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; validation ; FAMILY ; REDUCTION ; NO ; prevention ; HEALTH ; AGE ; family history ; colorectal cancer ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; EFFICACY ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; aspirin ; sensitivity ; specificity ; VALIDITY ; SCREENING SIGMOIDOSCOPY ; case control study ; case-control study ; RE ; FAMILIES ; colonoscopy ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; USA ; reproducibility of results ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; colorectal neoplasms ; ENDOSCOPY ; colorectal ; POLYPECTOMY ; KAPPA ; mass screening ; MEDICAL-RECORD AUDIT ; reporting ; validation studies ; VETERANS
    Abstract: Large-bowel endoscopy with removal of polyps strongly reduces colorectal cancer risk. In epidemiologic studies, ascertainment of large-bowel endoscopies often relies on self-reports and might be prone to imperfect recall. In 2003-2004, the authors assessed the validity of self-reported colorectal endoscopies in a population-based case-control study including 540 cases and 614 controls from southwest Germany and calculated odds ratios of colorectal cancer risk according to self-reports and medical records. They sought to obtain all medical records for the last self-reported endoscopy and for a subsample of 100 subjects reporting no previous endoscopy. In total, 377 of 483 records could be obtained (78%). Sensitivity of self-reports was 100%, and specificity ranged from 93% to 98% among subgroups defined by age, gender, education, family history of colorectal cancer, and case-control status. The odds ratios for colorectal cancer risk after previous colonoscopy were 0.31 (95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.45) using self-reports and 0.31 (95% confidence interval: 0.20, 0.47) using medical records. However, agreement between self-reports and medical records was poor regarding type of endoscopy (colonoscopy, sigmoicloscopy, or rectoscopy; kappa = 0.22), moderate concerning polypectomy (kappa = 0.58), and reasonable for year of examination (kappa = 0.70). Self-reports of previous colorectal endoscopies agreed well with medical records, but validation appears to be essential with respect to details of the examination
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17456475
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; screening ; TOOL ; POPULATION ; RISK ; IMPACT ; ADENOMAS ; prevention ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; CERVICAL-CANCER ; RATES ; DATABASE ; EUROPE ; colonoscopy ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; colorectal ; POLYPECTOMY ; CRC ; REMOVAL
    Abstract: In late 2002, colonoscopy was introduced as a primary screening tool for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Germany We aimed to estimate the expected reduction in case numbers and incidence of CRC between 2003 and 2010 by detection and removal of advanced adenomas. Data from 1,875,708 women and men included in the national screening colonoscopy database were combined with estimates of transition rates of advanced adenomas and with national population projections. Despite relatively low screening participation, incident CRC cases are expected to be reduced by more than 15,000 between 2003 and 2010. The impact is expected to be largest in age groups 55-59, 60-64 and 65-69 in whom total case numbers in 2010 are expected to be reduced by 13%, 19% and 14% among women, and by 11%, 15% and 12%, respectively, among men. our results forecast a major rapid reduction of the CRC burden in Germany by screening colonoscopy. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19289271
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  • 8
    Keywords: RISK ; prevention ; SURVEILLANCE ; PREVALENCE ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; ENDOSCOPY ; POLYPECTOMY ; sigmoidoscopy ; SCREENING COLONOSCOPY ; MISS RATE
    Abstract: Background Colonoscopy is used for early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer, but evidence on the magnitude of overall protection and protection according to anatomical site through colonoscopy performed in the community setting is sparse. We assessed whether receiving a colonoscopy in the preceding 10-year period, compared with no colonoscopy, was associated with prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasms (defined as cancers or advanced adenomas) at various anatomical sites. Methods A statewide cross-sectional study was conducted among 3287 participants in screening colonoscopy between May 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, from the state of Saarland in Germany who were aged 55 years or older. Prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasms was ascertained by screening colonoscopy and histopathologic examination of any polyps excised. Previous colonoscopy history was obtained by standardized questionnaire, and its association with prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasms was estimated, after adjustment for potential confounding factors by log-binomial regression. Results Advanced colorectal neoplasms were detected in 308 (11.4%) of the 2701 participants with no previous colonoscopy compared with 36 (6.1%) of the 586 participants who had undergone colonoscopy within the preceding 10 years. After adjustment, overall and site-specific adjusted prevalence ratios for previous colonoscopy in the previous 10-year period were as follows: overall, 0.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.37 to 0.73); cecum and ascending colon, 0.99 (95% CI = 0.50 to 1.97); hepatic flexure and transverse colon, 1.21 (95% CI = 0.60 to 2.42); right-sided colon combined (cecum to transverse colon), 1.05 (95% CI = 0.63 to 1.76); splenic flexure and descending colon, 0.36 (95% CI = 0.16 to 0.82); sigmoid colon, 0.29 (95% CI = 0.16 to 0.53); rectum, 0.07 (95% CI = 0.02 to 0.40); left colon and rectum combined (splenic flexure to rectum, referred to as left-sided elsewhere), 0.33 (95% CI = 0.21 to 0.53). Conclusion Prevalence of left-sided advanced colorectal neoplasms, but not right-sided advanced neoplasms, was strongly reduced within a 10-year period after colonoscopy, even in the community setting.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20042716
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; screening ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; DIFFERENTIATION ; TIME ; NEOPLASIA ; prevention ; PATTERNS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; US ; POPULATIONS ; UNITED-STATES ; INITIATION ; GUIDELINES ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; ELDERLY-PATIENTS ; colonoscopy ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; LEVEL ; cancer registry ; EXTENT ; colorectal ; BENEFITS ; MILLION WOMEN ; sigmoidoscopy
    Abstract: There is some variation regarding age at initiation of screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) between countries, but the same age of initiation is generally recommended for women and men within countries, despite important gender differences in the epidemiology of CRC. We have explored whether, and to what extent, these differences would be relevant regarding age at initiation of CRC screening. Using population-based cancer registry data from the US and national mortality statistics from different countries, we looked at cumulative 10-year incidence and mortality of CRC reached among men at ages 50, 55, and 60, and found that women mainly reached equivalent levels when 4 to 8 years older. The gender differences were remarkably constant across populations and over time. These patterns suggest that gender differentiation of age at initiation may be worthwhile to utilise CRC-screening resources more efficiently
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17311019
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  • 10
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    Internist 49 (6), 655-659 
    Keywords: evaluation ; Germany ; DIAGNOSIS ; screening ; TOOL ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; MORTALITY ; NEW-YORK ; early detection ; prevention ; NUMBER ; FECAL-OCCULT-BLOOD ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COMPLICATIONS ; MANAGEMENT ; IMPLEMENTATION ; colonoscopy ; PHASE ; OVERDIAGNOSIS ; USA ; COSTS ; MEDICINE ; evidence based medicine
    Abstract: Screening can be a very powerful tool for prevention or more effective treatment of diseases. However, a number of prerequisites have to be met. Only diseases with a preclinical phase, during which the disease or its precursors can be detected by a suited test, are amenable to screening. Early detection of the disease must enable either prevention or more effective management of the disease and not just prolong the "patient career". The benefits of screening must encompass potential harms, which may include, for example, complications, false positive diagnoses or over-diagnoses (i.e. the diagnosis of clinically irrelevant disease). Benefits from screening must be achieved at acceptable costs. Implementation of screening has to be based on scientific evidence and accompanied by scientific evaluation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18392600
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