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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISTINCT ; prognosis ; PROGRESSION ; chemotherapy ; ABERRATIONS ; MUTATIONS ; CHILDREN ; ADOLESCENTS ; INTRATUMOR HETEROGENEITY
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Recurrent medulloblastoma is a therapeutic challenge because it is almost always fatal. Studies have confirmed that medulloblastoma consists of at least four distinct subgroups. We sought to delineate subgroup-specific differences in medulloblastoma recurrence patterns. METHODS: We retrospectively identified a discovery cohort of all recurrent medulloblastomas at the Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, ON, Canada) from 1994 to 2012 (cohort 1), and established molecular subgroups using a nanoString-based assay on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues or frozen tissue. The anatomical site of recurrence (local tumour bed or leptomeningeal metastasis), time to recurrence, and survival after recurrence were assessed in a subgroup-specific manner. Two independent, non-overlapping cohorts (cohort 2: samples from patients with recurrent medulloblastomas from 13 centres worldwide, obtained between 1991 and 2012; cohort 3: samples from patients with recurrent medulloblastoma obtained at the NN Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute [Moscow, Russia] between 1994 and 2011) were analysed to confirm and validate observations. When possible, molecular subgrouping was done on tissue obtained from both the initial surgery and at recurrence. RESULTS: Cohort 1 consisted of 30 patients with recurrent medulloblastomas; nine with local recurrences, and 21 with metastatic recurrences. Cohort 2 consisted of 77 patients and cohort 3 of 96 patients with recurrent medulloblastoma. Subgroup affiliation remained stable at recurrence in all 34 cases with available matched primary and recurrent pairs (five pairs from cohort 1 and 29 pairs from cohort 2 [15 SHH, five group 3, 14 group 4]). This finding was validated in 17 pairs from cohort 3. When analysed in a subgroup-specific manner, local recurrences in cohort 1 were more frequent in SHH tumours (eight of nine [89%]) and metastatic recurrences were more common in group 3 and group 4 tumours (17 of 20 [85%] with one WNT, p=0.0014, local vs metastatic recurrence, SHH vs group 3 vs group 4). The subgroup-specific location of recurrence was confirmed in cohort 2 (p=0.0013 for local vs metastatic recurrence, SHH vs group 3 vs group 4,), and cohort 3 (p〈0.0001). Treatment with craniospinal irradiation at diagnosis was not significantly associated with the anatomical pattern of recurrence. Survival after recurrence was significantly longer in patients with group 4 tumours in cohort 1 (p=0.013) than with other subgroups, which was confirmed in cohort 2 (p=0.0075), but not cohort 3 (p=0.70). INTERPRETATION: Medulloblastoma does not change subgroup at the time of recurrence, reinforcing the stability of the four main medulloblastoma subgroups. Significant differences in the location and timing of recurrence across medulloblastoma subgroups have potential treatment ramifications. Specifically, intensified local (posterior fossa) therapy should be tested in the initial treatment of patients with SHH tumours. Refinement of therapy for patients with group 3 or group 4 tumours should focus on metastases. FUNDING: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Institutes of Health, Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, Garron Family Chair in Childhood Cancer Research at The Hospital for Sick Children and The University of Toronto.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24140199
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  • 2
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; DIAGNOSIS ; prognosis ; CHILDREN ; RECURRENT ; TP53 mutation
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Children presenting with medulloblastoma have a wide range of initial presenting symptoms. However, the influence of underlying tumor biology on the initial presentation of medulloblastoma is currently unknown. In light of the recent discovery of distinct medulloblastoma subgroups, we sought to define the initial presentation of childhood medulloblastoma in a subgroup specific manner. PROCEDURE: We assembled a cohort of 126 medulloblastoma cases at the Hospital for Sick Children between 1994 and 2012 and determined subgroup affiliation using nanoString. Clinical details pertaining to the initial presentation were determined through a retrospective chart review. RESULTS: The median pre-diagnostic interval across all medulloblastoma cases was 4 weeks (IQR: 4-12 weeks). Strikingly, when the pre-diagnostic interval was then determined in a subgroup specific manner, cases with WNT and Group 4 tumors showed significantly longer median pre-diagnostic intervals of 8 weeks compared to 2 weeks for SHH and 4 weeks for Group 3 (P = 0.0001). Younger age was significantly associated with a prolonged pre-diagnostic interval (P = 0.02 for all). When stratifying by subgroup the association with age was only significant in Group 4 (P = 0.04 for Group 4). Improved survival was significantly associated with a longer pre-diagnostic interval (P = 0.02), however is no longer significant when controlling for subgroup (P = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS: The duration of the pre-diagnostic interval in childhood medulloblastoma is highly subgroup dependent, further highlighting the clinical heterogeneity and biological relevance of the four principle subgroups of medulloblastoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24616042
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  • 3
    Keywords: DISEASE ; DISTINCT ; prognosis ; meta-analysis ; WNT ; ADULT ; medulloblastoma ; SUBTYPES ; PROFILES ; CONSENSUS ; CHILDHOOD MEDULLOBLASTOMA ; SUBGROUPS ; STRATIFICATION ; BETA-CATENIN STATUS ; PEDIATRIC MEDULLOBLASTOMAS ; SHH ; Group 3 ; Group 4 ; Pediatric brain tumor
    Abstract: Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in childhood. Molecular studies from several groups around the world demonstrated that medulloblastoma is not one disease but comprises a collection of distinct molecular subgroups. However, all these studies reported on different numbers of subgroups. The current consensus is that there are only four core subgroups, which should be termed WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4. Based on this, we performed a meta-analysis of all molecular and clinical data of 550 medulloblastomas brought together from seven independent studies. All cases were analyzed by gene expression profiling and for most cases SNP or array-CGH data were available. Data are presented for all medulloblastomas together and for each subgroup separately. For validation purposes, we compared the results of this meta-analysis with another large medulloblastoma cohort (n = 402) for which subgroup information was obtained by immunohistochemistry. Results from both cohorts are highly similar and show how distinct the molecular subtypes are with respect to their transcriptome, DNA copy-number aberrations, demographics, and survival. Results from these analyses will form the basis for prospective multi-center studies and will have an impact on how the different subgroups of medulloblastoma will be treated in the future.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22358457
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; CLASSIFICATION ; DISTINCT ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; prognosis ; MUTATION ; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; WNT ; medulloblastoma ; CONSENSUS ; SUBGROUPS ; PATHWAY ACTIVATION ; BETA-CATENIN STATUS ; PEDIATRIC MEDULLOBLASTOMAS ; SHH ; Group 3 ; Group 4
    Abstract: Medulloblastoma, a small blue cell malignancy of the cerebellum, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric oncology. Current mechanisms for clinical prognostication and stratification include clinical factors (age, presence of metastases, and extent of resection) as well as histological subgrouping (classic, desmoplastic, and large cell/anaplastic histology). Transcriptional profiling studies of medulloblastoma cohorts from several research groups around the globe have suggested the existence of multiple distinct molecular subgroups that differ in their demographics, transcriptomes, somatic genetic events, and clinical outcomes. Variations in the number, composition, and nature of the subgroups between studies brought about a consensus conference in Boston in the fall of 2010. Discussants at the conference came to a consensus that the evidence supported the existence of four main subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). Participants outlined the demographic, transcriptional, genetic, and clinical differences between the four subgroups. While it is anticipated that the molecular classification of medulloblastoma will continue to evolve and diversify in the future as larger cohorts are studied at greater depth, herein we outline the current consensus nomenclature, and the differences between the medulloblastoma subgroups.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22134537
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  • 5
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; tumor ; INHIBITION ; PATHWAY ; TUMORS ; prognosis ; CLUSTER ; medulloblastoma ; SUBTYPES ; PROFILES ; hsa-miR-182 ; Metastatic dissemination ; POLYCISTRON ; SHH pathway
    Abstract: The contribution of microRNAs to the initiation, progression, and metastasis of medulloblastoma (MB) remains poorly understood. Metastatic dissemination at diagnosis is present in about 30% of MB patients, and is associated with a dismal prognosis. Using microRNA expression profiling, we demonstrate that the retinal miR-183-96-182 cluster on chromosome 7q32 is highly overexpressed in non-sonic hedgehog MBs (non-SHH-MBs). Expression of miR-182 and miR-183 is associated with cerebellar midline localization, and miR-182 is significantly overexpressed in metastatic MB as compared to non-metastatic tumors. Overexpression of miR-182 in non-SHH-MB increases and knockdown of miR-182 decreases cell migration in vitro. Xenografts overexpressing miR-182 invaded adjacent normal tissue and spread to the leptomeninges, phenotypically reminiscent of clinically highly aggressive large cell anaplastic MB. Hence, our study provides strong in vitro and in vivo evidence that miR-182 contributes to leptomeningeal metastatic dissemination in non-SHH-MB. We therefore reason that targeted inhibition of miR-182 may prevent leptomeningeal spread in patients with non-SHH-MB.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22134538
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