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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; PROSTATE ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; MARKER ; IMPACT ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; LINKAGE ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; STAGE ; IDENTIFICATION ; HEALTH ; SNP ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; diabetes ; REPLICATION ; FUTURE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; ONCOLOGY ; VARIANT ; METAANALYSIS ; biomarker ; methods ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; LINKAGE-DISEQUILIBRIUM ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; genetic association ; SCAN ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Type ; single nucleotide ; RISK-ASSOCIATED LOCI
    Abstract: Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (PrCa). In the two-stage Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility prostate cancer scan, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10486567, located within intron 2 of JAZF1 gene on chromosome 7p15.2, showed a promising association with PrCa overall (P = 2.14 x 10(-6)), with a suggestion of stronger association with aggressive disease (P = 1.2 x 10(-7)). Methods: In the third stage of genome-wide association studies, we genotyped 106 JAZF1 SNPs in 10,286 PrCa cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry. Results: The strongest association was observed with the initial marker rs10486567, which now achieves genome-wide significance [P = 7.79 x 10(-11); ORHET, 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.27); ORHOM, 1.37 (95% confidence interval, 1.20-1.56)]. We did not confirm a previous suggestion of a stronger association of rs10486567 with aggressive disease (P = 1.60 x 10(-4) for aggressive cancer, n = 4,597; P = 3.25 x 10(-8) for non-aggressive cancer, n = 4,514). Based on a multilocus model with adjustment for rs10486567, no additional independent signals were observed at chromosome 7p15.2. There was no association between PrCa risk and SNPs in JAZF1 previously associated with height (rs849140; P = 0.587), body stature (rs849141, tagged by rs849136; P = 0.171), and risk of type 2 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus (rs864745, tagged by rs849142; P = 0.657). Conclusion: rs10486567 remains the most significant marker for PrCa risk within JAZF1 in individuals of European ancestry. Impact: Future studies should identify all variants in high linkage disequilibrium with rs10486567 and evaluate their functional significance for PrCa. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(5); 1349-55. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20406958
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  • 2
    Keywords: MODELS ; POPULATION ; SIGNAL ; BREAST-CANCER ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; COMMON VARIANT ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; RECOMBINATION HOTSPOTS ; IDENTIFIES 5 ; MYEOV
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies have identified prostate cancer susceptibility alleles on chromosome 11q13. As part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) Initiative, the region flanking the most significant marker, rs10896449, was fine mapped in 10 272 cases and 9123 controls of European origin (10 studies) using 120 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected by a two-staged tagging strategy using HapMap SNPs. Single-locus analysis identified 18 SNPs below genome-wide significance (P 〈 10(-8)) with rs10896449 the most significant (P = 7.94 x 10(-19)). Multi-locus models that included significant SNPs sequentially identified a second association at rs12793759 [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 4.76 x 10(-5), adjusted P = 0.004] that is independent of rs10896449 and remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing within the region. rs10896438, a proxy of previously reported rs12418451 (r(2) = 0.96), independent of both rs10896449 and rs12793759 was detected (OR = 1.07, P = 5.92 x 10(-3), adjusted P = 0.054). Our observation of a recombination hotspot that separates rs10896438 from rs10896449 and rs12793759, and low linkage disequilibrium (rs10896449-rs12793759, r(2) = 0.17; rs10896449-rs10896438, r(2) = 0.10; rs12793759-rs10896438, r(2) = 0.12) corroborate our finding of three independent signals. By analysis of tagged SNPs across similar to 123 kb using next generation sequencing of 63 controls of European origin, 1000 Genome and HapMap data, we observed multiple surrogates for the three independent signals marked by rs10896449 (n = 31), rs10896438 (n = 24) and rs12793759 (n = 8). Our results indicate that a complex architecture underlying the common variants contributing to prostate cancer risk at 11q13. We estimate that at least 63 common variants should be considered in future studies designed to investigate the biological basis of the multiple association signals
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21531787
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  • 3
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; REDUCED RISK ; HUMAN GENES ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; BINDING-SITES ; COMMON VARIANT ; CASP8 GENE ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; IDENTIFIES 3
    Abstract: Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNA) or in the miRNA binding sites may affect the miRNA dependent gene expression regulation, which has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, and may alter individual susceptibility to cancer. We investigated associations between miRNA related SNPs and breast cancer risk. First we evaluated 2,196 SNPs in a case-control study combining nine genome wide association studies (GWAS). Second, we further investigated 42 SNPs with suggestive evidence for association using 41,785 cases and 41,880 controls from 41 studies included in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). Combining the GWAS and BCAC data within a meta-analysis, we estimated main effects on breast cancer risk as well as risks for estrogen receptor (ER) and age defined subgroups. Five miRNA binding site SNPs associated significantly with breast cancer risk: rs1045494 (odds ratio (OR) 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-0.96), rs1052532 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.99), rs10719 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94-0.99), rs4687554 (OR 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95-0.99, and rs3134615 (OR 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05) located in the 3' UTR of CASP8, HDDC3, DROSHA, MUSTN1, and MYCL1, respectively. DROSHA belongs to miRNA machinery genes and has a central role in initial miRNA processing. The remaining genes are involved in different molecular functions, including apoptosis and gene expression regulation. Further studies are warranted to elucidate whether the miRNA binding site SNPs are the causative variants for the observed risk effects.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25390939
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  • 4
    Keywords: INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; susceptibility loci ; SERUM ADIPONECTIN ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; CIRCULATING ADIPONECTIN ; PLASMA ADIPONECTIN ; SOLUBLE LEPTIN RECEPTOR ; MOLECULAR-WEIGHT ADIPONECTIN
    Abstract: Circulating adiponectin has been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genome-wide association studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with adiponectin levels. However, it is unclear whether these SNPs are associated with CRC risk. In addition, previous data on SNPs in the adiponectin pathway and their associations with CRC are inconsistent. Therefore, we examined 19 SNPs in genes related to adiponectin or its receptors and their associations with CRC using logistic regression among 7,020 cases and 7,631 controls drawn from ten studies included in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Using data from a subset of two large cohort studies, we also assessed the contribution of individual SNPs and an adiponectin genetic score to plasma adiponectin after accounting for lifestyle factors among 2,217 women and 619 men. We did not find any statistically significant association between the 19 adiponectin-associated SNPs and CRC risk (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios ranged from 0.89 to 1.05, all p 〉 0.05). Each SNP explained less than 2.50% of the variance of plasma adiponectin, and the genetic score collectively accounted for 2.95 and 1.42% of the variability of adiponectin in women and men, respectively, after adjustment for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, regular use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and postmenopausal hormone use. In conclusion, our findings do not support an association between known adiponectin-related common SNPs and CRC incidence. However, known common SNPs account for only a limited proportion of the interindividual variance in circulating adiponectin. Further work is warranted to investigate the relationship between adiponectin and CRC while accounting for other components in the pathway.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25431318
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  • 5
    Keywords: PROSTATE ; prevention ; WOMEN ; SUBTYPES ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONSORTIUM
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. METHODS: We investigated the value of using 77 breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for risk stratification, in a study of 33 673 breast cancer cases and 33 381 control women of European origin. We tested all possible pair-wise multiplicative interactions and constructed a 77-SNP polygenic risk score (PRS) for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Absolute risks of breast cancer by PRS were derived from relative risk estimates and UK incidence and mortality rates. RESULTS: There was no strong evidence for departure from a multiplicative model for any SNP pair. Women in the highest 1% of the PRS had a three-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with women in the middle quintile (odds ratio [OR] = 3.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.95 to 3.83). The ORs for ER-positive and ER-negative disease were 3.73 (95% CI = 3.24 to 4.30) and 2.80 (95% CI = 2.26 to 3.46), respectively. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for women in the lowest and highest quintiles of the PRS were 5.2% and 16.6% for a woman without family history, and 8.6% and 24.4% for a woman with a first-degree family history of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The PRS stratifies breast cancer risk in women both with and without a family history of breast cancer. The observed level of risk discrimination could inform targeted screening and prevention strategies. Further discrimination may be achievable through combining the PRS with lifestyle/environmental factors, although these were not considered in this report.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25855707
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  • 6
    Keywords: carcinoma ; WOMEN ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; CLINICAL-SIGNIFICANCE ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; COHORT CONSORTIUM ; IDENTIFIES 2
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer in situ (BCIS) diagnoses, a precursor lesion for invasive breast cancer, comprise about 20 % of all breast cancers (BC) in countries with screening programs. Family history of BC is considered one of the strongest risk factors for BCIS. METHODS: To evaluate the association of BC susceptibility loci with BCIS risk, we genotyped 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), associated with risk of invasive BC, in 1317 BCIS cases, 10,645 invasive BC cases, and 14,006 healthy controls in the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Using unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for age and study, we estimated the association of SNPs with BCIS using two different comparison groups: healthy controls and invasive BC subjects to investigate whether BCIS and BC share a common genetic profile. RESULTS: We found that five SNPs (CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, FGFR2-rs3750817, FGFR2-rs2981582, TNRC9-rs3803662, 5p12-rs10941679) were significantly associated with BCIS risk (P value adjusted for multiple comparisons 〈0.0016). Comparing invasive BC and BCIS, the largest difference was for CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, which showed a positive association with BCIS (OR = 1.24, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.38, P = 1.27 x 10(-4)) and no association with invasive BC (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI: 0.99-1.07, P = 0.06), with a P value for case-case comparison of 0.006. Subgroup analyses investigating associations with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) found similar associations, albeit less significant (OR = 1.25, 95 % CI: 1.09-1.42, P = 1.07 x 10(-3)). Additional risk analyses showed significant associations with invasive disease at the 0.05 level for 28 of the alleles and the OR estimates were consistent with those reported by other studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our study adds to the knowledge that several of the known BC susceptibility loci are risk factors for both BCIS and invasive BC, with the possible exception of rs1011970, a putatively functional SNP situated in the CDKN2BAS gene that may be a specific BCIS susceptibility locus.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26070784
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  • 7
    Keywords: polymorphism ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR GENE ; mammographic density ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; IDENTIFIES 2
    Abstract: The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; ptrend = 2.84 x 10-4 ; HRheterozygotes = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes = 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; p2DF = 1.45 x 10-3 ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; ptrend = 6.6 x 10-4 ; HRheterozygotes = 0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; p2DF =1.25 x 10-4 ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25611573
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; IDENTIFICATION ; METAANALYSIS ; LOCUS ; 8Q24 ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MULTIPLE LOCI ; HEPATOCYTE NUCLEAR FACTOR-1-BETA
    Abstract: Previous genome-wide association studies have identified two independent variants in HNF1B as susceptibility loci for prostate cancer risk. To fine-map common genetic variation in this region, we genotyped 79 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 17q12 region harboring HNF1B in 10 272 prostate cancer cases and 9123 controls of European ancestry from 10 case-control studies as part of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. Ten SNPs were significantly related to prostate cancer risk at a genome-wide significance level of P 〈 5 x 10(-8) with the most significant association with rs4430796 (P = 1.62 x 10(-24)). However, risk within this first locus was not entirely explained by rs4430796. Although modestly correlated (r(2) = 0.64), rs7405696 was also associated with risk (P = 9.35 x 10(-23)) even after adjustment for rs4430769 (P = 0.007). As expected, rs11649743 was related to prostate cancer risk (P = 3.54 x 10(-8)); however, the association within this second locus was stronger for rs4794758 (P = 4.95 x 10(-10)), which explained all of the risk observed with rs11649743 when both SNPs were included in the same model (P = 0.32 for rs11649743; P = 0.002 for rs4794758). Sequential conditional analyses indicated that five SNPs (rs4430796, rs7405696, rs4794758, rs1016990 and rs3094509) together comprise the best model for risk in this region. This study demonstrates a complex relationship between variants in the HNF1B region and prostate cancer risk. Further studies are needed to investigate the biological basis of the association of variants in 17q12 with prostate cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21576123
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; IDENTIFIES 5
    Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer shows a higher incidence in women of African ancestry compared to women of European ancestry. In search of common risk alleles for ER-negative breast cancer, we combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from women of African ancestry (1,004 ER-negative cases and 2,745 controls) and European ancestry (1,718 ER-negative cases and 3,670 controls), with replication testing conducted in an additional 2,292 ER-negative cases and 16,901 controls of European ancestry. We identified a common risk variant for ER-negative breast cancer at the TERT-CLPTM1L locus on chromosome 5p15 (rs10069690: per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18 per allele, P = 1.0 x 10(-10)). The variant was also significantly associated with triple-negative (ER-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative and human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2)-negative) breast cancer (OR = 1.25, P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), particularly in younger women (〈50 years of age) (OR = 1.48, P = 1.9 x 10(-9)). Our results identify a genetic locus associated with estrogen receptor negative breast cancer subtypes in multiple populations.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22037553
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  • 10
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; GENE ; SIGNALING PATHWAY ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN ; CONSORTIUM ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; 14Q24.1 RAD51L1
    Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for similar to 9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P 〈 5 x 10(-8)). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23535729
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