Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-10-21
    Description: Angiogenesis is critical during tumour initiation and malignant progression. Different strategies aimed at blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors have been developed to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer patients. It has become increasingly clear that in addition to its effect on angiogenesis, other mechanisms including a direct effect of VEGF on tumour cells may account for the efficiency of VEGF-blockade therapies. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been described in various cancers including squamous tumours of the skin. Here we use a mouse model of skin tumours to investigate the impact of the vascular niche and VEGF signalling on controlling the stemness (the ability to self renew and differentiate) of squamous skin tumours during the early stages of tumour progression. We show that CSCs of skin papillomas are localized in a perivascular niche, in the immediate vicinity of endothelial cells. Furthermore, blocking VEGFR2 caused tumour regression not only by decreasing the microvascular density, but also by reducing CSC pool size and impairing CSC renewal properties. Conditional deletion of Vegfa in tumour epithelial cells caused tumours to regress, whereas VEGF overexpression by tumour epithelial cells accelerated tumour growth. In addition to its well-known effect on angiogenesis, VEGF affected skin tumour growth by promoting cancer stemness and symmetric CSC division, leading to CSC expansion. Moreover, deletion of neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), a VEGF co-receptor expressed in cutaneous CSCs, blocked VEGF's ability to promote cancer stemness and renewal. Our results identify a dual role for tumour-cell-derived VEGF in promoting cancer stemness: by stimulating angiogenesis in a paracrine manner, VEGF creates a perivascular niche for CSCs, and by directly affecting CSCs through Nrp1 in an autocrine loop, VEGF stimulates cancer stemness and renewal. Finally, deletion of Nrp1 in normal epidermis prevents skin tumour initiation. These results may have important implications for the prevention and treatment of skin cancers.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Beck, Benjamin -- Driessens, Gregory -- Goossens, Steven -- Youssef, Khalil Kass -- Kuchnio, Anna -- Caauwe, Amelie -- Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A -- Loges, Sonja -- Lapouge, Gaelle -- Candi, Aurelie -- Mascre, Guilhem -- Drogat, Benjamin -- Dekoninck, Sophie -- Haigh, Jody J -- Carmeliet, Peter -- Blanpain, Cedric -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 19;478(7369):399-403. doi: 10.1038/nature10525.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉IRIBHM, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 808 route de Lennik, 1070 Brussels, Belgium.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22012397" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/*blood supply/*pathology ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Proliferation ; Cells, Cultured ; Disease Models, Animal ; Epithelial Cells/cytology ; Gene Deletion ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Mice ; Neoplastic Stem Cells ; Neuropilin-1/genetics/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Skin Neoplasms/*blood supply/*pathology ; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-01-07
    Description: Endothelial cells (ECs) are plastic cells that can switch between growth states with different bioenergetic and biosynthetic requirements. Although quiescent in most healthy tissues, ECs divide and migrate rapidly upon proangiogenic stimulation. Adjusting endothelial metabolism to the growth state is central to normal vessel growth and function, yet it is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report that the forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor FOXO1 is an essential regulator of vascular growth that couples metabolic and proliferative activities in ECs. Endothelial-restricted deletion of FOXO1 in mice induces a profound increase in EC proliferation that interferes with coordinated sprouting, thereby causing hyperplasia and vessel enlargement. Conversely, forced expression of FOXO1 restricts vascular expansion and leads to vessel thinning and hypobranching. We find that FOXO1 acts as a gatekeeper of endothelial quiescence, which decelerates metabolic activity by reducing glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Mechanistically, FOXO1 suppresses signalling by MYC (also known as c-MYC), a powerful driver of anabolic metabolism and growth. MYC ablation impairs glycolysis, mitochondrial function and proliferation of ECs while its EC-specific overexpression fuels these processes. Moreover, restoration of MYC signalling in FOXO1-overexpressing endothelium normalizes metabolic activity and branching behaviour. Our findings identify FOXO1 as a critical rheostat of vascular expansion and define the FOXO1-MYC transcriptional network as a novel metabolic checkpoint during endothelial growth and proliferation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wilhelm, Kerstin -- Happel, Katharina -- Eelen, Guy -- Schoors, Sandra -- Oellerich, Mark F -- Lim, Radiance -- Zimmermann, Barbara -- Aspalter, Irene M -- Franco, Claudio A -- Boettger, Thomas -- Braun, Thomas -- Fruttiger, Marcus -- Rajewsky, Klaus -- Keller, Charles -- Bruning, Jens C -- Gerhardt, Holger -- Carmeliet, Peter -- Potente, Michael -- K08CA090438/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2016 Jan 14;529(7585):216-20. doi: 10.1038/nature16498. Epub 2016 Jan 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Angiogenesis &Metabolism Laboratory, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, D-61231 Bad Nauheim, Germany. ; Laboratory of Angiogenesis and Neurovascular Link, Vesalius Research Center, Department of Oncology, University of Leuven, Leuven 3000, Belgium. ; Laboratory of Angiogenesis and Neurovascular Link, Vesalius Research Center, VIB, Leuven 3000, Belgium. ; Vascular Biology Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY, UK. ; Vascular Morphogenesis Laboratory, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon 1649-028, Portugal. ; Department of Cardiac Development and Remodeling, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, D-61231 Bad Nauheim, Germany. ; UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London EC1V 9EL, UK. ; Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), D-13125 Berlin, Germany. ; Children's Cancer Therapy Development Institute, Beaverton, Oregon 97005, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD) and Center of Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), Center for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Preventive Medicine (CEDP), University of Cologne, D-50931 Cologne, Germany. ; Vascular Patterning Laboratory, Vesalius Research Center, VIB and University of Leuven, Leuven 3000, Belgium. ; DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Berlin, D-13347 Berlin, Germany. ; Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), D-10117 Berlin, Germany. ; International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 02-109 Warsaw, Poland. ; DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Frankfurt Rhine-Main, D-13347 Berlin, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26735015" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Proliferation ; Cell Respiration ; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/*growth & development/*metabolism ; Female ; Forkhead Transcription Factors/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Glycolysis ; Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...