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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-02-21
    Description: High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a chromatin-binding nuclear protein, plays a critical role in sepsis by acting as a key "late-phase" inflammatory mediator. Integrin CD11b is essential for inflammatory cell activation and migration, thus mediating inflammatory responses. However, it is unclear whether CD11b participates in the development of sepsis. In this study, we report that CD11b contributes to LPS-induced endotoxin shock and microbial sepsis, as antagonism of CD11b with the CD11b blocking Ab or CD11b inhibitor Gu-4 protects mice against LPS- and microbial sepsis-related lethality, which is associated with significantly diminished serum HMGB1 levels. Consistent with this, CD11b-deficient mice were more resistant to microbial sepsis with a much lower serum HMGB1 level compared with wild-type mice. Pharmacological blockage and genetic knockdown/knockout of CD11b in murine macrophages hampered LPS-stimulated HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release. Furthermore, silencing CD11b interrupted the interaction of HMGB1 with either a nuclear export factor chromosome region maintenance 1 or classical protein kinase C and inhibited classical protein kinase C–induced HMGB1 phosphorylation, the potential underlying mechanism(s) responsible for CD11b blockage-induced suppression of HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation and subsequent extracellular release. Thus, our results highlight that CD11b contributes to the development of sepsis, predominantly by facilitating nucleocytoplasmic translocation and active release of HMGB1.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 371 (1994), S. 9-9 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] SIR - We wish to draw your readers' attention to the outcome of an important conference held by UNESCO and the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU) at the Komarov Botanical Institute in St Petersburg in December 1993. Among other things, the status and the future of botanical ...
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Thiazolidinediones are a new class of antidiabetic agent that improve insulin sensitivity and reduce plasma glucose and blood pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Although these agents can bind and activate an orphan nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ...
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1437-9813
    Keywords: Key words Gastric erosions ; Drug intake ; Children ; Acute gastrointestinal bleeding ; Endoscopy
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract The authors evaluated the relationship between drug intake and upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The endoscopic files of the previous 2 years were reviewed and the incidence and age and sex distribution recorded. GI bleeding is indication for a high percentage of lower endoscopies and a low percentage of upper endoscopies. On the other hand, although rarer upper GI bleeding is more severe and frequently related to drug ingestion. About 50% of cases showed gastric erosions secondary to drug intake. A relation between gastric bleeding and paracetamol is considered, as is the possibility of preventing secondary severe bleeding by pharmacologic gastric protection in children with risk factors such as chronic use of other drugs or portal hypertension.
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-11-12
    Description: In multicellular organisms, transcription regulation is one of the central mechanisms modelling lineage differentiation and cell-fate determination. Transcription requires dynamic chromatin configurations between promoters and their corresponding distal regulatory elements. It is believed that their communication occurs within large discrete foci of aggregated RNA polymerases termed transcription factories in three-dimensional nuclear space. However, the dynamic nature of chromatin connectivity has not been characterized at the genome-wide level. Here, through a chromatin interaction analysis with paired-end tagging approach using an antibody that primarily recognizes the pre-initiation complexes of RNA polymerase II, we explore the transcriptional interactomes of three mouse cells of progressive lineage commitment, including pluripotent embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells and neurosphere stem/progenitor cells. Our global chromatin connectivity maps reveal approximately 40,000 long-range interactions, suggest precise enhancer-promoter associations and delineate cell-type-specific chromatin structures. Analysis of the complex regulatory repertoire shows that there are extensive colocalizations among promoters and distal-acting enhancers. Most of the enhancers associate with promoters located beyond their nearest active genes, indicating that the linear juxtaposition is not the only guiding principle driving enhancer target selection. Although promoter-enhancer interactions exhibit high cell-type specificity, promoters involved in interactions are found to be generally common and mostly active among different cells. Chromatin connectivity networks reveal that the pivotal genes of reprogramming functions are transcribed within physical proximity to each other in embryonic stem cells, linking chromatin architecture to coordinated gene expression. Our study sets the stage for the full-scale dissection of spatial and temporal genome structures and their roles in orchestrating development.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3954713/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3954713/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Yubo -- Wong, Chee-Hong -- Birnbaum, Ramon Y -- Li, Guoliang -- Favaro, Rebecca -- Ngan, Chew Yee -- Lim, Joanne -- Tai, Eunice -- Poh, Huay Mei -- Wong, Eleanor -- Mulawadi, Fabianus Hendriyan -- Sung, Wing-Kin -- Nicolis, Silvia -- Ahituv, Nadav -- Ruan, Yijun -- Wei, Chia-Lin -- 1U54HG004557-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- GGP12152/Telethon/Italy -- GM61390/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK090382/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059862/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004456-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS079231/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01DK090382/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01HD059862/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HG003521-01/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG005058/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG006768/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01NS079231/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U01 GM061390/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U19 GM061390/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 12;504(7479):306-10. doi: 10.1038/nature12716. Epub 2013 Nov 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA [2] [3] Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel (R.Y.B.); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Systems Biology Center, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA (Y.Z.). ; 1] Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Institute for Human Genetics, UCSF, San Francisco, California 94158, USA [2] [3] Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501, Israel (R.Y.B.); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Systems Biology Center, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA (Y.Z.). ; 1] The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, and Department of Genetic and Development Biology, University of Connecticut, 400 Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA [2] Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, 138672 Singapore. ; Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Milano-Bicocca, 20126 Milano, Italy. ; Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA. ; Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, 138672 Singapore. ; Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Institute for Human Genetics, UCSF, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, and Department of Genetic and Development Biology, University of Connecticut, 400 Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA. ; 1] Sequencing Technology Group, Joint Genome Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA [2] Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, 138672 Singapore.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24213634" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; Cell Lineage ; Chromatin/*genetics/*metabolism ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/*genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation/*genetics ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Mice ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/*genetics ; RNA Polymerase II/metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics ; Zebrafish/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-03-22
    Description: The observed stability of Earth's climate over millions of years is thought to depend on the rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) release from the solid Earth being balanced by the rate of CO2 consumption by silicate weathering. During the Cenozoic era, spanning approximately the past 66 million years, the concurrent increases in the marine isotopic ratios of strontium, osmium and lithium suggest that extensive uplift of mountain ranges may have stimulated CO2 consumption by silicate weathering, but reconstructions of sea-floor spreading do not indicate a corresponding increase in CO2 inputs from volcanic degassing. The resulting imbalance would have depleted the atmosphere of all CO2 within a few million years. As a result, reconciling Cenozoic isotopic records with the need for mass balance in the long-term carbon cycle has been a major and unresolved challenge in geochemistry and Earth history. Here we show that enhanced sulphide oxidation coupled to carbonate dissolution can provide a transient source of CO2 to Earth's atmosphere that is relevant over geological timescales. Like drawdown by means of silicate weathering, this source is probably enhanced by tectonic uplift, and so may have contributed to the relative stability of the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 during the Cenozoic. A variety of other hypotheses have been put forward to explain the 'Cenozoic isotope-weathering paradox', and the evolution of the carbon cycle probably depended on multiple processes. However, an important role for sulphide oxidation coupled to carbonate dissolution is consistent with records of radiogenic isotopes, atmospheric CO2 partial pressure and the evolution of the Cenozoic sulphur cycle, and could be accounted for by geologically reasonable changes in the global dioxygen cycle, suggesting that this CO2 source should be considered a potentially important but as yet generally unrecognized component of the long-term carbon cycle.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Torres, Mark A -- West, A Joshua -- Li, Gaojun -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 20;507(7492):346-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13030.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; MOE Key Laboratory of Surficial Geochemistry, Department of Earth Sciences, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlindadao, Nanjing 210046, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24646998" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-07-18
    Description: The surface of the cornea consists of a unique type of non-keratinized epithelial cells arranged in an orderly fashion, and this is essential for vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Cornea epithelial cells (CECs) undergo continuous renewal from limbal stem or progenitor cells (LSCs), and deficiency in LSCs or corneal epithelium--which turns cornea into a non-transparent, keratinized skin-like epithelium--causes corneal surface disease that leads to blindness in millions of people worldwide. How LSCs are maintained and differentiated into corneal epithelium in healthy individuals and which key molecular events are defective in patients have been largely unknown. Here we report establishment of an in vitro feeder-cell-free LSC expansion and three-dimensional corneal differentiation protocol in which we found that the transcription factors p63 (tumour protein 63) and PAX6 (paired box protein PAX6) act together to specify LSCs, and WNT7A controls corneal epithelium differentiation through PAX6. Loss of WNT7A or PAX6 induces LSCs into skin-like epithelium, a critical defect tightly linked to common human corneal diseases. Notably, transduction of PAX6 in skin epithelial stem cells is sufficient to convert them to LSC-like cells, and upon transplantation onto eyes in a rabbit corneal injury model, these reprogrammed cells are able to replenish CECs and repair damaged corneal surface. These findings suggest a central role of the WNT7A-PAX6 axis in corneal epithelial cell fate determination, and point to a new strategy for treating corneal surface diseases.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4610745/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4610745/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ouyang, Hong -- Xue, Yuanchao -- Lin, Ying -- Zhang, Xiaohui -- Xi, Lei -- Patel, Sherrina -- Cai, Huimin -- Luo, Jing -- Zhang, Meixia -- Zhang, Ming -- Yang, Yang -- Li, Gen -- Li, Hairi -- Jiang, Wei -- Yeh, Emily -- Lin, Jonathan -- Pei, Michelle -- Zhu, Jin -- Cao, Guiqun -- Zhang, Liangfang -- Yu, Benjamin -- Chen, Shaochen -- Fu, Xiang-Dong -- Liu, Yizhi -- Zhang, Kang -- GM049369/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY020846/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021374/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 17;511(7509):358-61. doi: 10.1038/nature13465. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing 100730, China (X.Z.); Department of Ophthalmology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004, China (Y.Y.). ; Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China [2] Guangzhou KangRui Biological Pharmaceutical Technology Company Ltd., Guangzhou 510005, China. ; Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Nanoengineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [3] Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; 1] State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510060, China [2] Department of Ophthalmology, and Biomaterial and Tissue Engineering Center of Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [3] Molecular Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan 610041, China [4] Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [5] Veterans Administration Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25030175" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Lineage ; Corneal Diseases/*metabolism/*pathology ; Disease Models, Animal ; Epithelium, Corneal/*cytology/*metabolism/pathology ; Eye Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Homeodomain Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; *Homeostasis ; Humans ; Limbus Corneae/cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Paired Box Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism ; Rabbits ; Repressor Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Skin/cytology/metabolism/pathology ; Stem Cell Transplantation ; Stem Cells/cytology/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/metabolism ; Wnt Proteins/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-11-11
    Description: DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that is essential for various developmental processes through regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, and epigenetic inheritance. Mammalian genomic DNA methylation is established during embryogenesis by de novo DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B, and the methylation patterns vary with developmental stages and cell types. DNA methyltransferase 3-like protein (DNMT3L) is a catalytically inactive paralogue of DNMT3 enzymes, which stimulates the enzymatic activity of Dnmt3a. Recent studies have established a connection between DNA methylation and histone modifications, and revealed a histone-guided mechanism for the establishment of DNA methylation. The ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain of Dnmt3a recognizes unmethylated histone H3 (H3K4me0). The histone H3 tail stimulates the enzymatic activity of Dnmt3a in vitro, whereas the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that DNMT3A exists in an autoinhibitory form and that the histone H3 tail stimulates its activity in a DNMT3L-independent manner. We determine the crystal structures of DNMT3A-DNMT3L (autoinhibitory form) and DNMT3A-DNMT3L-H3 (active form) complexes at 3.82 and 2.90 A resolution, respectively. Structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the ADD domain of DNMT3A interacts with and inhibits enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain (CD) through blocking its DNA-binding affinity. Histone H3 (but not H3K4me3) disrupts ADD-CD interaction, induces a large movement of the ADD domain, and thus releases the autoinhibition of DNMT3A. The finding adds another layer of regulation of DNA methylation to ensure that the enzyme is mainly activated at proper targeting loci when unmethylated H3K4 is present, and strongly supports a negative correlation between H3K4me3 and DNA methylation across the mammalian genome. Our study provides a new insight into an unexpected autoinhibition and histone H3-induced activation of the de novo DNA methyltransferase after its initial genomic positioning.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Guo, Xue -- Wang, Ling -- Li, Jie -- Ding, Zhanyu -- Xiao, Jianxiong -- Yin, Xiaotong -- He, Shuang -- Shi, Pan -- Dong, Liping -- Li, Guohong -- Tian, Changlin -- Wang, Jiawei -- Cong, Yao -- Xu, Yanhui -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jan 29;517(7536):640-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13899. Epub 2014 Nov 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China [2] State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China. ; Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. ; National Center for Protein Science Shanghai, State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; 1] High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, China [2] National Laboratory for Physical Science at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China [3] School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China. ; 1] National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101, China [2] University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049, China. ; National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Biomembrane and Membrane Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25383530" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Catalytic Domain ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; DNA/metabolism ; DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase/*antagonists & ; inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; DNA Methylation ; Enzyme Activation ; Histones/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Xenopus laevis
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-12-06
    Description: In the Kondo insulator samarium hexaboride (SmB6), strong correlation and band hybridization lead to an insulating gap and a diverging resistance at low temperature. The resistance divergence ends at about 3 kelvin, a behavior that may arise from surface conductance. We used torque magnetometry to resolve the Fermi surface topology in this material. The observed oscillation patterns reveal two Fermi surfaces on the (100) surface plane and one Fermi surface on the (101) surface plane. The measured Fermi surface cross sections scale as the inverse cosine function of the magnetic field tilt angles, which demonstrates the two-dimensional nature of the conducting electronic states of SmB6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, G -- Xiang, Z -- Yu, F -- Asaba, T -- Lawson, B -- Cai, P -- Tinsman, C -- Berkley, A -- Wolgast, S -- Eo, Y S -- Kim, Dae-Jeong -- Kurdak, C -- Allen, J W -- Sun, K -- Chen, X H -- Wang, Y Y -- Fisk, Z -- Li, Lu -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Dec 5;346(6214):1208-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1250366.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. ; Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230026, China. ; Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA. ; Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230026, China. ; Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. ; Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. luli@umich.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25477456" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-07-12
    Description: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the world's most important non-grain food crop and is central to global food security. It is clonally propagated, highly heterozygous, autotetraploid, and suffers acute inbreeding depression. Here we use a homozygous doubled-monoploid potato clone to sequence and assemble 86% of the 844-megabase genome. We predict 39,031 protein-coding genes and present evidence for at least two genome duplication events indicative of a palaeopolyploid origin. As the first genome sequence of an asterid, the potato genome reveals 2,642 genes specific to this large angiosperm clade. We also sequenced a heterozygous diploid clone and show that gene presence/absence variants and other potentially deleterious mutations occur frequently and are a likely cause of inbreeding depression. Gene family expansion, tissue-specific expression and recruitment of genes to new pathways contributed to the evolution of tuber development. The potato genome sequence provides a platform for genetic improvement of this vital crop.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium -- Xu, Xun -- Pan, Shengkai -- Cheng, Shifeng -- Zhang, Bo -- Mu, Desheng -- Ni, Peixiang -- Zhang, Gengyun -- Yang, Shuang -- Li, Ruiqiang -- Wang, Jun -- Orjeda, Gisella -- Guzman, Frank -- Torres, Michael -- Lozano, Roberto -- Ponce, Olga -- Martinez, Diana -- De la Cruz, German -- Chakrabarti, S K -- Patil, Virupaksh U -- Skryabin, Konstantin G -- Kuznetsov, Boris B -- Ravin, Nikolai V -- Kolganova, Tatjana V -- Beletsky, Alexey V -- Mardanov, Andrei V -- Di Genova, Alex -- Bolser, Daniel M -- Martin, David M A -- Li, Guangcun -- Yang, Yu -- Kuang, Hanhui -- Hu, Qun -- Xiong, Xingyao -- Bishop, Gerard J -- Sagredo, Boris -- Mejia, Nilo -- Zagorski, Wlodzimierz -- Gromadka, Robert -- Gawor, Jan -- Szczesny, Pawel -- Huang, Sanwen -- Zhang, Zhonghua -- Liang, Chunbo -- He, Jun -- Li, Ying -- He, Ying -- Xu, Jianfei -- Zhang, Youjun -- Xie, Binyan -- Du, Yongchen -- Qu, Dongyu -- Bonierbale, Merideth -- Ghislain, Marc -- Herrera, Maria del Rosario -- Giuliano, Giovanni -- Pietrella, Marco -- Perrotta, Gaetano -- Facella, Paolo -- O'Brien, Kimberly -- Feingold, Sergio E -- Barreiro, Leandro E -- Massa, Gabriela A -- Diambra, Luis -- Whitty, Brett R -- Vaillancourt, Brieanne -- Lin, Haining -- Massa, Alicia N -- Geoffroy, Michael -- Lundback, Steven -- DellaPenna, Dean -- Buell, C Robin -- Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar -- Marshall, David F -- Waugh, Robbie -- Bryan, Glenn J -- Destefanis, Marialaura -- Nagy, Istvan -- Milbourne, Dan -- Thomson, Susan J -- Fiers, Mark -- Jacobs, Jeanne M E -- Nielsen, Kare L -- Sonderkaer, Mads -- Iovene, Marina -- Torres, Giovana A -- Jiang, Jiming -- Veilleux, Richard E -- Bachem, Christian W B -- de Boer, Jan -- Borm, Theo -- Kloosterman, Bjorn -- van Eck, Herman -- Datema, Erwin -- Hekkert, Bas te Lintel -- Goverse, Aska -- van Ham, Roeland C H J -- Visser, Richard G F -- BB/F012640/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/F012640/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- WT 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jul 10;475(7355):189-95. doi: 10.1038/nature10158.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉BGI-Shenzhen, Chinese Ministry of Agricultural, Key Lab of Genomics, Beishan Industrial Zone, Yantian District, Shenzhen 518083, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21743474" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Duplication ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Genes, Plant/genetics ; Genetic Variation ; Genome, Plant/*genetics ; *Genomics ; Haplotypes/genetics ; Heterozygote ; Homozygote ; Immunity, Innate ; Inbreeding ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Plant Diseases/genetics ; Ploidies ; Solanum tuberosum/*genetics/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
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