Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • DKFZ Publication Database  (2)
  • DISEASE  (1)
  • LOAD  (1)
  • PROSPECTIVE COHORT  (1)
Collection
  • DKFZ Publication Database  (2)
  • 1
    Keywords: DISEASE ; kidney ; TRIAL ; HEALTH ; OUTCOMES ; METAANALYSIS ; RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; GENETIC-VARIANTS ; D SUPPLEMENTATION
    Abstract: Background Low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration is associated with high arterial blood pressure and hypertension risk, but whether this association is causal is unknown. We used a mendelian randomisation approach to test whether 25(OH)D concentration is causally associated with blood pressure and hypertension risk. Methods In this mendelian randomisation study, we generated an allele score (25[OH]D synthesis score) based on variants of genes that affect 25(OH)D synthesis or substrate availability (CYP2R1 and DHCR7), which we used as a proxy for 25(OH)D concentration. We meta-analysed data for up to 108 173 individuals from 35 studies in the D-CarDia collaboration to investigate associations between the allele score and blood pressure measurements. We complemented these analyses with previously published summary statistics from the International Consortium on Blood Pressure (ICBP), the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, and the Global Blood Pressure Genetics (Global BPGen) consortium. Findings In phenotypic analyses (up to n=49 363), increased 25(OH) D concentration was associated with decreased systolic blood pressure (beta per 10% increase, -0.12 mm Hg, 95% CI -0.20.to -0.04; p=0.003) and reduced odds of hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99; p=0.0003), but not with decreased diastolic blood pressure (beta per 10% increase, -0.02 mm Hg, -0.08 to 0.03; p=0.37). In meta-analyses in which we combined data from D-CarDia and the ICBP (n=146 581, after exclusion of overlapping studies), each 25(OH)D-increasing allele of the synthesis score was associated with a change of -0.10 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (-0.21 to -0.0001; p=0.0498) and a change of -0.08 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure (-0.15 to -0.02; p=0.01). When D-CarDia and consortia data for hypertension were meta-analysed together (n=142 255), the synthesis score was associated with a reduced odds of hypertension (OR per allele, 0.98, 0.96-0.99; p=0.001). In instrumental variable analysis, each 10% increase in genetically instrumented 25(OH) D concentration was associated with a change of -0.29 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure (-0.52 to -0.07; p=0.01), a change of -0.37 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (-0.73 to 0.003; p=0.052), and an 8 1% decreased odds of hypertension (OR 0.92, 0.87-0.97; p=0.002). Interpretation Increased plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D might reduce the risk of hypertension. This finding warrants further investigation in an independent, similarly powered study.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24974252
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; insulin ; caffeine ; glycemic index ; COFFEE CONSUMPTION ; LOAD
    Abstract: Data on the role of dietary factors in endometrial cancer development are limited and inconsistent. We applied a "nutrient-wide association study" approach to systematically evaluate dietary risk associations for endometrial cancer while controlling for multiple hypothesis tests using the false discovery rate (FDR) and validating the results in an independent cohort. We evaluated endometrial cancer risk associations for dietary intake of 84 foods and nutrients based on dietary questionnaires in three prospective studies, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC; N = 1,303 cases) followed by validation of nine foods/nutrients (FDR 〈= 0.10) in the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHSII; N = 1,531 cases). Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). In multivariate adjusted comparisons of the extreme categories of intake at baseline, coffee was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (EPIC, median intake 750 g/day vs. 8.6; HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.97, P-trend = 0.09; NHS/NHSII, median intake 1067 g/day vs. none; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96, P-trend = 0.04). Eight other dietary factors that were associated with endometrial cancer risk in the EPIC study (total fat, monounsaturated fat, carbohydrates, phosphorus, butter, yogurt, cheese, and potatoes) were not confirmed in the NHS/NHSII. Our findings suggest that coffee intake may be inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. Further data are needed to confirm these findings and to examine the mechanisms linking coffee intake to endometrial cancer risk to develop improved prevention strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25662427
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...