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  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (14)
  • 11
    Publication Date: 2014-05-07
    Description: In the adult central nervous system, the vasculature of the neurogenic niche regulates neural stem cell behavior by providing circulating and secreted factors. Age-related decline of neurogenesis and cognitive function is associated with reduced blood flow and decreased numbers of neural stem cells. Therefore, restoring the functionality of the niche should counteract some of the negative effects of aging. We show that factors found in young blood induce vascular remodeling, culminating in increased neurogenesis and improved olfactory discrimination in aging mice. Further, we show that GDF11 alone can improve the cerebral vasculature and enhance neurogenesis. The identification of factors that slow the age-dependent deterioration of the neurogenic niche in mice may constitute the basis for new methods of treating age-related neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123747/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123747/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Katsimpardi, Lida -- Litterman, Nadia K -- Schein, Pamela A -- Miller, Christine M -- Loffredo, Francesco S -- Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R -- Chen, John W -- Lee, Richard T -- Wagers, Amy J -- Rubin, Lee L -- 1DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 5U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG032977/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS070835/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS072167/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS070835/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS072167/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 9;344(6184):630-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1251141. Epub 2014 May 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24797482" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/*drug effects ; Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*administration & dosage/blood/physiology ; Brain/blood supply/*drug effects ; Cerebrovascular Circulation/*drug effects ; Cognition/drug effects ; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/drug effects ; Growth Differentiation Factors/*administration & dosage/blood/physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neural Stem Cells/cytology/*drug effects ; Neurogenesis/*drug effects ; Olfactory Bulb/cytology/drug effects ; Parabiosis ; Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage ; *Rejuvenation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 12
    Publication Date: 2014-06-14
    Description: Sediments cored along the southwestern Iberian margin during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 339 provide constraints on Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) circulation patterns from the Pliocene epoch to the present day. After the Strait of Gibraltar opened (5.33 million years ago), a limited volume of MOW entered the Atlantic. Depositional hiatuses indicate erosion by bottom currents related to higher volumes of MOW circulating into the North Atlantic, beginning in the late Pliocene. The hiatuses coincide with regional tectonic events and changes in global thermohaline circulation (THC). This suggests that MOW influenced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), THC, and climatic shifts by contributing a component of warm, saline water to northern latitudes while in turn being influenced by plate tectonics.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hernandez-Molina, F Javier -- Stow, Dorrik A V -- Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A -- Acton, Gary -- Bahr, Andre -- Balestra, Barbara -- Ducassou, Emmanuelle -- Flood, Roger -- Flores, Jose-Abel -- Furota, Satoshi -- Grunert, Patrick -- Hodell, David -- Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco -- Kim, Jin Kyoung -- Krissek, Lawrence -- Kuroda, Junichiro -- Li, Baohua -- Llave, Estefania -- Lofi, Johanna -- Lourens, Lucas -- Miller, Madeline -- Nanayama, Futoshi -- Nishida, Naohisa -- Richter, Carl -- Roque, Cristina -- Pereira, Helder -- Sanchez Goni, Maria Fernanda -- Sierro, Francisco J -- Singh, Arun Deo -- Sloss, Craig -- Takashimizu, Yasuhiro -- Tzanova, Alexandrina -- Voelker, Antje -- Williams, Trevor -- Xuan, Chuang -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jun 13;344(6189):1244-50. doi: 10.1126/science.1251306.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK. javier.hernandez-molina@rhul.ac.uk. ; Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, Scotland, UK. ; International Ocean Discovery Program, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, USA. ; Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341, USA. ; Institute of Geosciences, University of Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany. ; Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; EPOC, Universite de Bordeaux, 33615 Pessac Cedex, France. ; School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. ; Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Salamanca, 3008 Salamanca, Spain. ; Department of Natural History Sciences, Hokkaido University, N10W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan. ; Institute for Earth Sciences, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz, Austria. ; Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK. ; Department of Biogeochemistry, JAMSTEC, 237-0061 Yokosuka, Japan. ; Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology, Ansan 426-744, Korea. ; School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Institute for Frontier Research on Earth Evolution (IFREE), JAMSTEC, 2-15 Natsushima-Cho, Yokosuka-city, Kanagawa 237-0061, Japan. ; Department of Micropalaeontology, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, P.R. China. ; Instituto Geologico y Minero de Espana, Rios Rosas 23, 28003 Madrid, Spain. ; Geosciences Montpellier, Universite Montpellier II, 34090 Montpellier, France, and Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK. ; Institute of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands. ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. ; Institute of Geology and Geoinformation, Geological Survey of Japan (AIST), Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan. ; School of Geosciences, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA. ; Divisao de Geologia e Georecursos Marinhos, IPMA, 1749-077 Lisboa, Portugal. ; Grupo de Biologia e Geologia, Escola Secundaria de Loule, 8100-740 Loule, Portugal. ; Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, EPOC, Universite de Bordeaux, 33615 Pessac, France. ; Department of Geology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India. ; School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia. ; Department of Geology, Faculty of Education, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan. ; Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA. ; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA. ; Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926012" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Atlantic Ocean ; *Climate Change ; Mediterranean Sea ; Paleontology ; *Seawater ; *Water Movements
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 13
    Publication Date: 2011-01-15
    Description: Long-term population viability of Fraser River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) is threatened by unusually high levels of mortality as they swim to their spawning areas before they spawn. Functional genomic studies on biopsied gill tissue from tagged wild adults that were tracked through ocean and river environments revealed physiological profiles predictive of successful migration and spawning. We identified a common genomic profile that was correlated with survival in each study. In ocean-tagged fish, a mortality-related genomic signature was associated with a 13.5-fold greater chance of dying en route. In river-tagged fish, the same genomic signature was associated with a 50% increase in mortality before reaching the spawning grounds in one of three stocks tested. At the spawning grounds, the same signature was associated with 3.7-fold greater odds of dying without spawning. Functional analysis raises the possibility that the mortality-related signature reflects a viral infection.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Miller, Kristina M -- Li, Shaorong -- Kaukinen, Karia H -- Ginther, Norma -- Hammill, Edd -- Curtis, Janelle M R -- Patterson, David A -- Sierocinski, Thomas -- Donnison, Louise -- Pavlidis, Paul -- Hinch, Scott G -- Hruska, Kimberly A -- Cooke, Steven J -- English, Karl K -- Farrell, Anthony P -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 14;331(6014):214-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1196901.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Genetics Section, Pacific Biological Station, 3190 Hammond Bay Road, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6N7, Canada. kristi.miller@dfo-mpo.gc.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21233388" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Animal Migration ; Animals ; Canada ; Female ; Fish Diseases/genetics/immunology/mortality ; *Gene Expression ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; Genome ; Gills ; Male ; Mortality ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Pacific Ocean ; Population Dynamics ; Principal Component Analysis ; Remote Sensing Technology ; *Reproduction ; Rivers ; Salmon/*genetics/*physiology ; Stress, Physiological ; Survival Analysis ; Virus Diseases/genetics/immunology/mortality/veterinary
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 14
    Publication Date: 2018-12-14
    Description: Human nervous system development is an intricate and protracted process that requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation. We generated tissue-level and single-cell transcriptomic data from up to 16 brain regions covering prenatal and postnatal rhesus macaque development. Integrative analysis with complementary human data revealed that global intraspecies (ontogenetic) and interspecies (phylogenetic) regional transcriptomic differences exhibit concerted cup-shaped patterns, with a late fetal-to-infancy (perinatal) convergence. Prenatal neocortical transcriptomic patterns revealed transient topographic gradients, whereas postnatal patterns largely reflected functional hierarchy. Genes exhibiting heterotopic and heterochronic divergence included those transiently enriched in the prenatal prefrontal cortex or linked to autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. Our findings shed light on transcriptomic programs underlying the evolution of human brain development and the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders.
    Keywords: Development, Genetics, Neuroscience, Online Only
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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