Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • UNITED-STATES  (16)
  • 11
    Keywords: CANCER ; ASSOCIATION ; LONG-TERM SURVIVAL ; UNITED-STATES ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; OLDER PATIENTS ; ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA ; SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS ; PLUS RITUXIMAB ; EARLY 21ST-CENTURY
    Abstract: Background. New treatment options and supportive care measures have greatly improved survival of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) but may not be affordable for those with no insurance or inadequate insurance. Methods. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, we estimated overall and cause-specific survival according to insurance status within 3 years after diagnosis of patients diagnosed with NHL in the U.S. in the period 2007-2011. Because NHL is a heterogeneous condition, we also examined survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Results. Survival was higher for patients with non-Medicaid insurance compared with either uninsured patients or patients with Medicaid. For patients with any NHL, the 3-year survival estimates were 68.0% for uninsured patients, 60.7% for patients with Medicaid, and 84.9% for patients with non-Medicaid insurance. Hazard ratios (HRs) for uninsured and Medicaid-only patients compared with insured patients were 1.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.76-2.10) and 2.51 (95% CI: 2.36-2.68), respectively. Results were similar for patients with DLBCL, with survival estimates of 68.5% for uninsured patients (HR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.57-2.02), 58%, for patients with Medicaid (HR: 2.42; 95% CI: 2.22-2.64), and 83.3% for patients with non-Medicaid insurance. Cause-specific analysis showed survival estimates of 80.3% for uninsured patients (HR: 1.83; 95% CI: 1.62-2.05), 77.7% for patients with Medicaid (HR: 2.23; 95% CI: 2.05-2.42), and 90.5% for patients with non-Medicaid insurance. Conclusion. Lack of insurance and Medicaid only were associated with significantly lower survival for patients with NHL. Further evaluation of the reasons for this disparity and implementation of comprehensive coverage for medical care are urgently needed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25876991
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 12
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; BLOOD ; Germany ; THERAPY ; DIAGNOSIS ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; LONG-TERM ; PATIENT ; NO ; AGE ; DATABASE ; SURVEILLANCE ; UNITED-STATES ; STEM-CELL TRANSPLANTATION ; TRENDS ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; STATES ; AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION ; RE ; THERAPIES ; ELDERLY-PATIENTS ; INCREASE ; PERIOD ANALYSIS ; thalidomide ; analysis ; technique ; dexamethasone ; USA ; EMPIRICAL-EVALUATION ; INCREASES ; UP-TO-DATE ; UNTREATED PATIENTS
    Abstract: In the past, most patients with multiple myeloma (MM) died within 5 to 10 years after diagnosis. Within the past decade, several new therapeutic interventions have been introduced, including autologous stem-cell transplantation, thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib. We estimated trends in age-specific 5- and 10-year relative survival of patients with MM in the United States from 1990-1992 to 2002-2004 from the 1973-2004 database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Techniques of period analysis were used to show most recent developments. Overall, 5-year relative survival increased from 28.8% to 34.7% (P 〈.001), and 10-year relative survival increased from 11.1% to 17.4% (P 〈.001) between 1990-1992 and 2002-2004. Much stronger increases were seen in the age group younger than 50 years, leading to 5- and 10-year relative survival of 56.7% and 41.3% in 20022004, and in the age group 50 to 59 years, leading to 5- and 10-year relative survival of 48.2% and 28.6% in 200-2004. By contrast, only moderate improvement was seen in the age group 60 to 69 years, and essentially no improvement was achieved among older patients. Our period analysis discloses a major increase in long-term survival of younger patients with MM in recent years, which most likely reflects the effect of recent advances in therapy and their dissemination in clinical practice
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17901246
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 13
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; BLOOD ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; DISEASE ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; LONG-TERM ; POPULATION ; PATIENT ; prognosis ; LYMPHOMA ; AGE ; chemotherapy ; DATABASE ; SURVEILLANCE ; UNITED-STATES ; TRENDS ; STATES ; RE ; ELDERLY-PATIENTS ; INCREASE ; PERIOD ANALYSIS ; LEVEL ; analysis ; USA ; EMPIRICAL-EVALUATION ; INCREASES ; TO-DATE ; CHILDHOOD-CANCER SURVIVOR ; COLLABORATIVE BRITISH COHORT ; COPP-ABVD ; STUDY-GROUP GHSG
    Abstract: Since the breakthroughs in combination chemotherapy of patients with Hodgkin disease (HD) starting in the 1960s, prognosis of patients has been rising steadily. Trends in long-term survival of patients with HD on the population level should therefore be monitored in an as timely as possible manner. We assessed trends in age specific 5- and 10-year relative survival of patients with HD in the United States from 1980-1984 to 2000-2004 from the 1973-2004 database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Period analysis was used to disclose recent developments with minimum delay. Overall, 5-year relative survival steadily increased from 73.5% to 85.2% (+11.7 percentage units), and 10-year relative survival increased from 62.1% to 80.1% (+18.0 percentage units) between 1980-1984 and 2000-2004, according to period analysis. The increase was particularly pronounced for patients aged 45 to 59 years and 60 years and older (increases in 10-year relative survival by 24.8 and 23.3 percentage points, respectively). Nevertheless, a strong age gradient persisted, with 10-year relative survival of 92.7%, 88.7%, 84.9%, 76.2%, and 44.9% in patients aged 15 to 24 years, 25 to 34 years, 35 to 44 years, 45 to 54 years, and 60 years and older, respectively, in 2000-2004. Our period analysis discloses ongoing, major improvement in long-term survival of patients with HD in recent years, particularly among older patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18096762
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 14
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; BLOOD ; CELL ; Germany ; THERAPY ; DIAGNOSIS ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; LONG-TERM ; TIME ; PATIENT ; prognosis ; TRANSPLANTATION ; CONTRAST ; NO ; AGE ; leukemia ; DATABASE ; SURVEILLANCE ; UNITED-STATES ; NATURAL-HISTORY ; TRENDS ; STATES ; RE ; INCREASE ; PERIOD ANALYSIS ; fludarabine ; rituximab ; analysis ; cancer registry ; USA ; EMPIRICAL-EVALUATION ; STEM ; INCREASES ; UP-TO-DATE
    Abstract: Although chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has remained incurable with standard treatments, newer therapeutic approaches, such as chemoimmunotherapy or stem cell transplantation, bear the potential for prolonged survival. We estimated trends in age-specific 5- and 10-year absolute and relative survival of CLL patients in the United States between 1980-1984 and 2000-2004 from the 1973 to 2004 database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Period analysis was used to disclose recent developments with minimum delay. Overall, 5- and 10-year absolute survival from diagnosis increased from 54.2% to 60.2% (+6 percentage points; P 〈 .0001) and from 27.8% to 34.8% (+7 percentage points; P 〈 .0001), respectively. Despite a strong age gradient in prognosis, increases in 5-year absolute and relative survival over time were rather homogeneous across age groups. In contrast, increases in 10-year absolute and relative survival close to or well above 10% units were observed for all patients younger than 80 years of age at diagnosis compared with no increase at all for older patients. Long-term survival expectations of patients with CLL have substantially improved over the past 2 decades except for patients 80 years of age or older at the time of diagnosis. Future studies are needed to confirm and expand our findings
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18309034
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 15
    Keywords: INHIBITOR ; SURVIVAL ; CELL ; Germany ; KINASE ; THERAPY ; TYROSINE KINASE ; DIAGNOSIS ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; LONG-TERM ; POPULATION ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; TRANSPLANTATION ; BASE ; TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITOR ; AGE ; leukemia ; LONG-TERM SURVIVAL ; SURVEILLANCE ; UNITED-STATES ; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA ; CHRONIC MYELOID-LEUKEMIA ; imatinib ; TRENDS ; STATES ; FINLAND ; REGISTRY ; RE ; THERAPIES ; aging ; cancer registries ; INCREASE ; PERIOD ANALYSIS ; IMATINIB MESYLATE ; LEVEL ; analysis ; KINASE INHIBITOR ; EMPIRICAL-EVALUATION ; IMPROVEMENT ; STEM ; cancer survival ; UP-TO-DATE ; RECORDS ; HEMATOPOIETIC STEM ; CLINICAL-PRACTICE ; chronic myelocytic leukemia
    Abstract: Within the past decades, major advances in therapy for chronic myelocytic leukemia, including allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, interferon therapy, and, more recently, also therapy with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib, have entered clinical practice. The impact of these advances on long-term survival on the population level should be disclosed as timely as possible. We estimated trends in age specific 5- and 10-year relative survival of chronic myelocytic leukemia patients in the United States from 1990-1992 to 2002-2004. Our analysis is based on records from 8,329 patients aged 15 years or older with a first diagnosis of chronic myelocytic leukemia included in the 1973-2004 data base of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Period analysis was used to disclose recent developments with minimum delay. Overall, 5-year relative survival increased from 27 to 49%, and 10-year relative survival increased from 9.5 to 34% between 1990-92 and 2002-04. The increase was most dramatic for younger patients, with 10-year relative survival increasing from 16 to 72% in age group 15-44 years, from 12 to 54% in age group 45-54 years, and from 8 to 34% in age group 55-64 years (p〈0.0001 in all cases). Improvements were more modest and not statistically significant, and survival remained at much lower levels among age groups 65-74 and 75+ years. Our analysis discloses a dramatic recent increase in long-term survival of younger patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia which most likely reflects rapid dissemination of advances in therapy on the population level
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18641022
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 16
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; LONG-TERM SURVIVAL ; UNITED-STATES ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; PERIOD ANALYSIS ; rituximab ; EMPIRICAL-EVALUATION ; UP-TO-DATE ; LOW-GRADE
    Abstract: Abstract This study provides up-to-date and detailed cancer survival estimates of German patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL, International Statistical Classification of Diseases 10th Revision [ICD-10] codes C82-C85) based on data from 11 cancer registries. Period analysis was used to calculate 5-year relative survival in 2002-2006, overall and by gender, age and histology. Comparison was made with patients with NHL in the United States (US) Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database in the same time period. Overall 5-year relative survival for patients with NHL in Germany in 2002-2006 was 62.8% and in the US was 65.1%. Survival decreased with age from 81.7% at age 15-49 to 46.5% at age 75+. Survival in the US was 75.3% at age 15-49 and 52% at age 75+. Survival was higher for women than for men, at 65.2% for women and 60.7% for men. Survivals for diffuse B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma, the two most common subtypes of NHL, were 57.3% and 77.5%, respectively. Between 2002 and 2006, overall 5-year relative survival increased by 5.3 percentage points. We conclude that survival for NHL is increasing in Germany in recent years. Survival was higher in Germany than in the US for patients aged 15-49 but lower for older patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23098058
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...