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  • tumor  (8)
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  • 1
  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; carcinoma ; Germany ; human ; HYBRIDIZATION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; FAMILY ; MARKER ; hormone ; IN-SITU ; PROGRESSION ; immunohistochemistry ; PATTERNS ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; BENIGN ; GLYCATION END-PRODUCTS ; RAGE ; CARCINOMAS ; adenocarcinoma ; intraepithelial neoplasia ; NEURITE OUTGROWTH ; KAPPA-B ; CANCER PATIENTS ; HEALTHY ; prostate carcinoma ; OXIDANT STRESS ; SERUM ; in situ hybridization ; ELISA ; RE ; END ; TUMORIGENESIS ; HUMAN PROSTATE ; HYPERPLASIA ; TUMOR TISSUE ; MOLECULAR-GENETICS ; HUMAN-PROSTATE ; S100 PROTEINS ; EXPRESSION PATTERNS ; SERUM-LEVELS ; TUMOR DIFFERENTIATION
    Abstract: Purpose: S100 proteins comprise a family of calcium-modulated proteins that have recently been associated with epithelial tumors. We examined the expression of two members of this family, S10OA8 and S100A9, together with the S100 receptor RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products) in human prostate adenocarcinomas and in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Experimental Design:Tissue specimens of 75 patients with organ-confined prostate cancer of different grades were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of S10OA8, S100A9, and RAGE. In addition, in situ hybridization of S10OA8 and S10OA9 was done for 20 cases. An ELISA was applied to determine serum concentrations of S10OA9 in cancer patients compared with healthy controls or to patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Results: S100A8, S100A9, and RAGE were up-regulated in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and preferentially in high-grade adenocarcinomas, whereas benign tissue was negative or showed weak expression of the proteins. There was a high degree of overlap of S10OA8 and S10OA9 expression patterns and of S100A8 or S100A9 and RAGE, respectively. Frequently, a gradient within the tumor tissue with an increased expression toward the invaded stroma of the prostate was observed. S100A9 serum levels were significantly elevated in cancer patients compared with BPH patients or healthy individuals. Conclusion: Our data suggest that enhanced expression of S100A8, S100A9, and RAGE is an early event in prostate tumorigenesis and may contribute to development and progression or extension of prostate carcinomas. Furthermore, S100A9 in serum may serve as useful marker to discriminate between prostate cancer and BPH
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16033829
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  • 3
    Keywords: CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; tumor ; IN-VIVO ; KINASE ; PATHWAYS ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; MICE ; CARCINOGENESIS ; KERATINOCYTES ; SKIN ; PROTEIN-KINASE ; MAP KINASE ; LESIONS ; resistance ; INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; NUMBER ; epidermis ; GROWTH ARREST ; signaling ; RE ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR ; TUMORIGENESIS ; SIZE ; ERK ; function ; INVASIVENESS
    Abstract: Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) regulate cellular functions in response to a variety of external signals. However, the specific functions of individual ERK isoforms are largely unknown. Hence, we have investigated the specific function of ERK1 in skin homeostasis and tumorigenesis in ERK1 knockout mice. They spontaneously develop cutaneous lesions and hyperkeratosis with epidermis thickness. Skin hyperproliferation and inflammation induced by application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is strongly reduced in mutant mice. ERKI-/- mice are resistant to development of skin papillomas induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and promoted by TPA. Tumor appearance was delayed, their formation was less frequent, and their number and size were reduced. Keratinocytes obtained from knockout mice showed reduced growth and resistance to apoptotic signals, accompanied by an impaired expression of genes implicated in growth control and invasiveness. These results highlight the importance of ERK1 in skin homeostasis and in the process of skin tumor development
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16510590
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; INHIBITOR ; tumor ; carcinoma ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; VITRO ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; MICE ; PATIENT ; FAMILY ; AP-1 ; CARCINOGENESIS ; INDUCTION ; KERATINOCYTES ; SKIN ; BINDING ; fibroblasts ; MOUSE ; c-Fos ; PROMOTER ; MOUSE SKIN ; TRANSFORMATION ; BENIGN ; CARCINOMAS ; squamous cell carcinoma ; GLUCOCORTICOID-RECEPTOR ; SKIN-CANCER ; BINDING PROTEIN ; keratinocyte ; TRANSITION ; MALIGNANT PROGRESSION ; INTERSTITIAL COLLAGENASE ; CELL-CARCINOMA ; dexamethasone ; MOUSE KERATINOCYTES ; RECYCLING ENDOSOMES
    Abstract: Malignant transformation of mouse skin by tumor promoters and chemical carcinogens, such as the phorhol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), is a multistage process leading to the formation of squamous cell carcinomas. it has been shown that mice lacking the AP-1 family member c-Fos exhibit an impaired transition from benign to malignant skin tumors. Here, we demonstrate enhanced expression of the small Ras-related GTPase Rab11a after short-term TPA treatment of mouse back skin. Expression of Rab11a in vivo and in vitro critically depended on c-Fos, because TPA application to the back skin of c-Fos-deficient mice and to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not induce Rab11a mRNA or protein expression. Moreover, dexamethasone, which is a potent inhibitor of AP-1-mediated transactivation that exhibits anti-inflammatory and antitumor promoting activities, inhibited TPA-induced expression of Rab11a. Within the Rab11a gene promoter, we identified a functional AP-1 binding element that exhibited elevated c-Fos binding activity after TPA treatment of keratinocytes. Enhanced expression was not restricted to chemically induced mouse skin tumors but was also found in tumor specimens derived from patients with epithelial skin tumors. These data identify Rab11a as a novel, tumor-associated c-Fos/AP-1 target and may point to an as yet unrecognized function of Rab11a in the development of skin cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15972968
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  • 5
    Keywords: brain ; CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; INHIBITOR ; INVASION ; proliferation ; tumor ; CELL ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; Germany ; human ; IN-VIVO ; MODEL ; VITRO ; VIVO ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; PROTEIN ; transcription ; cell line ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; LINES ; MICE ; PATIENT ; TISSUES ; KERATINOCYTES ; SKIN ; T cell ; T-CELL ; CELL-LINES ; SIGNAL ; MOUSE ; STAGE ; UP-REGULATION ; MEMBRANE ; skin carcinogenesis ; CELL-LINE ; LINE ; ADHESION ; MIGRATION ; MORPHOLOGY ; INVOLVEMENT ; MOUSE MODEL ; TRANSLOCATION ; beta-catenin ; ECTODOMAIN ; cell lines ; SUBSTRATE-SPECIFICITY ; MATRIX ; E-cadherin ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; CAPACITY ; keratinocyte ; cell proliferation ; LEVEL ; NUCLEAR ; USA ; TISSUE INHIBITOR ; cancer research ; in vivo ; PLASMID ; DEFECT ; PROMOTES ; matrix metalloproteinase ; METALLOPROTEINASE ; ectodomain shedding ; MATRIX-METALLOPROTEINASE ; OVARIAN-CARCINOMA ; GROWTH-CONTROL ; EXTRACELLULAR CLEAVAGE ; HUMAN TISSUE KALLIKREINS ; PROTEINASE-ACTIVATED RECEPTORS ; SERINE PROTEINASE ; SERUM BIOMARKER
    Abstract: Recently, we described phorbol ester-induced expression of the brain and skin serine proteinase Bssp/kallikrein 6 (Klk6), the mouse orthologue of human KLK6, in mouse back skin and in advanced tumor stages of a well-established multistage tumor model. Here, we show KLK6 up-regulation in squamous skin tumors of human patients and in tumors of other epithelial tissues. Ectopic Klk6 expression in mouse keratinocyte cell lines induces a spindle-like morphology associated with accelerated proliferation, migration, and invasion capacity. We found reduced E-cadherin protein levels in the cell membrane and nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in Klk6-expressing mouse keratinocytes and human HEK293 cells transfected with a KLK6 expression plasmid. Additionally, HEK293 cells exhibited induced T-cell factor-dependent transcription and impaired cell-cell adhesion in the presence of KLK6, which was accompanied by induced E-cadherin ectodomain shedding. Interestingly, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-l and TIMP-3 interfere with KLK6-induced F-cadherin ectodomain shedding and rescue the cell-cell adhesion defect in vitro, suggesting the involvement of matrix metalloproteinase and/or a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) proteolytic activity. In line with this assumption, we found increased levels of the mature 62-kDa ADAM10 proteinase in cells expressing ectopic KLK6 compared with mock controls. Finally, enhanced epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and migration in concert with decreased E-cadherin protein levels are confirmed in an in vivo Klk6 transgenic mouse model
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17804733
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  • 6
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    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; NF-KAPPA-B ; TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR ; AP-1 ; CARCINOGENESIS ; COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; GLYCATION END-PRODUCTS ; RAGE ; NF-kappa B ; TUMOR CELLS ; inflammation ; CALCIUM-BINDING PROTEINS ; CALCIUM-BINDING PROTEIN ; HUMAN CANCER ; LEVEL ; TUMOR-CELL ; MICROVASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS ; chronic inflammation ; CALCIUM-BINDING ; function ; S100 ; HUMAN CANCERS ; CANCERS ; MALIGNANCY-ASSOCIATED REGIONS ; TRANSENDOTHELIAL MIGRATION
    Abstract: Calprotectin (S100A8/A9), a heterodimer of the two calcium-binding proteins S100A8 and S100A9, was originally discovered as immunogenic protein expressed and secreted by neutrophils. Subsequently, it has emerged as important pro-inflammatory mediator in acute and chronic inflammation. More recently, increased S100A8 and S100A9 levels were also detected in various human cancers, presenting abundant expression in neoplastic tumor cells as well as infiltrating immune cells. Although, many possible functions have been proposed for S100A8/A9, its biological role still remains to be defined. Altogether, its expression and potential cytokine-like function in inflammation and in cancer suggests that S100A8/A9 may play a key role in inflammation-associated cancer. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16846592
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  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; SUPPORT ; NEW-YORK ; TISSUE ; MICE ; LIGAND ; MECHANISM ; CARCINOGENESIS ; KERATINOCYTES ; mechanisms ; SKIN ; BONE-MARROW ; PROGRESSION ; MOUSE SKIN ; skin carcinogenesis ; LIGANDS ; FACTOR-KAPPA-B ; GLYCATION END-PRODUCTS ; inflammation ; signaling ; molecular ; RE ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; PHASE ; USA ; BONE ; immunology ; PROMOTES ; MEDICINE ; DOUBLE-EDGED-SWORD
    Abstract: A broad range of experimental and clinical evidence has highlighted the central role of chronic inflammation in promoting tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms converting a transient inflammatory tissue reaction into a tumor-promoting micro-environment remain largely elusive. We show that mice deficient for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) are resistant to DMBA/TPA-induced skin carcinogenesis and exhibit a severe defect in sustaining inflammation during the promotion phase. Accordingly, RAGE is required for TPA-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory mediators, maintenance of immune cell infiltration, and epidermal hyperplasia. RAGE-dependent up-regulation of its potential ligands S100a8 and S100a9 supports the existence of an S100/RAGE-driven feed-forward loop in chronic inflammation and tumor promotion. Finally, bone marrow chimera experiments revealed that RAGE expression on immune cells, but not keratinocytes or endothelial cells, is essential for TPA-induced dermal infiltration and epidermal hyperplasia. We show that RAGE signaling drives the strength and maintenance of an inflammatory reaction during tumor promotion and provide direct genetic evidence for a novel role for RAGE in linking chronic inflammation and cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18208974
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