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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-10-11
    Description: Spatial and temporal dissection of the genomic changes occurring during the evolution of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may help elucidate the basis for its dismal prognosis. We sequenced 25 spatially distinct regions from seven operable NSCLCs and found evidence of branched evolution, with driver mutations arising before and after subclonal diversification. There was pronounced intratumor heterogeneity in copy number alterations, translocations, and mutations associated with APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity. Despite maintained carcinogen exposure, tumors from smokers showed a relative decrease in smoking-related mutations over time, accompanied by an increase in APOBEC-associated mutations. In tumors from former smokers, genome-doubling occurred within a smoking-signature context before subclonal diversification, which suggested that a long period of tumor latency had preceded clinical detection. The regionally separated driver mutations, coupled with the relentless and heterogeneous nature of the genome instability processes, are likely to confound treatment success in NSCLC.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636050/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636050/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉de Bruin, Elza C -- McGranahan, Nicholas -- Mitter, Richard -- Salm, Max -- Wedge, David C -- Yates, Lucy -- Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam -- Shafi, Seema -- Murugaesu, Nirupa -- Rowan, Andrew J -- Gronroos, Eva -- Muhammad, Madiha A -- Horswell, Stuart -- Gerlinger, Marco -- Varela, Ignacio -- Jones, David -- Marshall, John -- Voet, Thierry -- Van Loo, Peter -- Rassl, Doris M -- Rintoul, Robert C -- Janes, Sam M -- Lee, Siow-Ming -- Forster, Martin -- Ahmad, Tanya -- Lawrence, David -- Falzon, Mary -- Capitanio, Arrigo -- Harkins, Timothy T -- Lee, Clarence C -- Tom, Warren -- Teefe, Enock -- Chen, Shann-Ching -- Begum, Sharmin -- Rabinowitz, Adam -- Phillimore, Benjamin -- Spencer-Dene, Bradley -- Stamp, Gordon -- Szallasi, Zoltan -- Matthews, Nik -- Stewart, Aengus -- Campbell, Peter -- Swanton, Charles -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 091730/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 105104/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A11590/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A17786/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A19310/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A4688/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Oct 10;346(6206):251-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1253462.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Science and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK. ; Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnologia de Cantabria (CSIC-UC-Sodercan), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. Department of Human Genetics, University of Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB23 3RE, UK. ; Lungs for Living Research Centre, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. University College London Hospitals, London NW1 2BU, UK. ; University College London Hospitals, London NW1 2BU, UK. ; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Carlsbad, CA 92008, USA. ; Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. charles.swanton@cancer.org.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25301630" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carcinogens/toxicity ; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/chemically induced/*diagnosis/*genetics ; Cytidine Deaminase/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Dosage ; *Genetic Heterogeneity ; *Genomic Instability ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/chemically induced/*diagnosis/*genetics ; Mutation ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/genetics ; Prognosis ; Smoking/adverse effects ; Translocation, Genetic ; Tumor Cells, Cultured
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2011-01-21
    Description: The genetics of renal cancer is dominated by inactivation of the VHL tumour suppressor gene in clear cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the commonest histological subtype. A recent large-scale screen of approximately 3,500 genes by PCR-based exon re-sequencing identified several new cancer genes in ccRCC including UTX (also known as KDM6A), JARID1C (also known as KDM5C) and SETD2 (ref. 2). These genes encode enzymes that demethylate (UTX, JARID1C) or methylate (SETD2) key lysine residues of histone H3. Modification of the methylation state of these lysine residues of histone H3 regulates chromatin structure and is implicated in transcriptional control. However, together these mutations are present in fewer than 15% of ccRCC, suggesting the existence of additional, currently unidentified cancer genes. Here, we have sequenced the protein coding exome in a series of primary ccRCC and report the identification of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene PBRM1 (ref. 4) as a second major ccRCC cancer gene, with truncating mutations in 41% (92/227) of cases. These data further elucidate the somatic genetic architecture of ccRCC and emphasize the marked contribution of aberrant chromatin biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3030920/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3030920/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Varela, Ignacio -- Tarpey, Patrick -- Raine, Keiran -- Huang, Dachuan -- Ong, Choon Kiat -- Stephens, Philip -- Davies, Helen -- Jones, David -- Lin, Meng-Lay -- Teague, Jon -- Bignell, Graham -- Butler, Adam -- Cho, Juok -- Dalgliesh, Gillian L -- Galappaththige, Danushka -- Greenman, Chris -- Hardy, Claire -- Jia, Mingming -- Latimer, Calli -- Lau, King Wai -- Marshall, John -- McLaren, Stuart -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mudie, Laura -- Stebbings, Lucy -- Largaespada, David A -- Wessels, L F A -- Richard, Stephane -- Kahnoski, Richard J -- Anema, John -- Tuveson, David A -- Perez-Mancera, Pedro A -- Mustonen, Ville -- Fischer, Andrej -- Adams, David J -- Rust, Alistair -- Chan-on, Waraporn -- Subimerb, Chutima -- Dykema, Karl -- Furge, Kyle -- Campbell, Peter J -- Teh, Bin Tean -- Stratton, Michael R -- Futreal, P Andrew -- 077012/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- R01 CA113636/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA134759/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jan 27;469(7331):539-42. doi: 10.1038/nature09639. Epub 2011 Jan 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21248752" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Carcinoma, Renal Cell/*genetics ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Disease Models, Animal ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Kidney Neoplasms/*genetics ; Mice ; Mutation/*genetics ; Nuclear Proteins/*genetics/*metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/genetics ; Transcription Factors/*genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis, and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast cancer have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here we examine the genomes of 100 tumours for somatic copy number changes and mutations in the coding exons of protein-coding genes. The number of somatic mutations varied markedly between individual tumours. We found strong correlations between mutation number, age at which cancer was diagnosed and cancer histological grade, and observed multiple mutational signatures, including one present in about ten per cent of tumours characterized by numerous mutations of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. Driver mutations were identified in several new cancer genes including AKT2, ARID1B, CASP8, CDKN1B, MAP3K1, MAP3K13, NCOR1, SMARCD1 and TBX3. Among the 100 tumours, we found driver mutations in at least 40 cancer genes and 73 different combinations of mutated cancer genes. The results highlight the substantial genetic diversity underlying this common disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428862/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428862/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stephens, Philip J -- Tarpey, Patrick S -- Davies, Helen -- Van Loo, Peter -- Greenman, Chris -- Wedge, David C -- Nik-Zainal, Serena -- Martin, Sancha -- Varela, Ignacio -- Bignell, Graham R -- Yates, Lucy R -- Papaemmanuil, Elli -- Beare, David -- Butler, Adam -- Cheverton, Angela -- Gamble, John -- Hinton, Jonathan -- Jia, Mingming -- Jayakumar, Alagu -- Jones, David -- Latimer, Calli -- Lau, King Wai -- McLaren, Stuart -- McBride, David J -- Menzies, Andrew -- Mudie, Laura -- Raine, Keiran -- Rad, Roland -- Chapman, Michael Spencer -- Teague, Jon -- Easton, Douglas -- Langerod, Anita -- Oslo Breast Cancer Consortium (OSBREAC) -- Lee, Ming Ta Michael -- Shen, Chen-Yang -- Tee, Benita Tan Kiat -- Huimin, Bernice Wong -- Broeks, Annegien -- Vargas, Ana Cristina -- Turashvili, Gulisa -- Martens, John -- Fatima, Aquila -- Miron, Penelope -- Chin, Suet-Feung -- Thomas, Gilles -- Boyault, Sandrine -- Mariani, Odette -- Lakhani, Sunil R -- van de Vijver, Marc -- van 't Veer, Laura -- Foekens, John -- Desmedt, Christine -- Sotiriou, Christos -- Tutt, Andrew -- Caldas, Carlos -- Reis-Filho, Jorge S -- Aparicio, Samuel A J R -- Salomon, Anne Vincent -- Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Campbell, Peter J -- Futreal, P Andrew -- Stratton, Michael R -- 077012/Z/05/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 093867/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 10118/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- CA089393/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- WT088340MA/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Chief Scientist Office/United Kingdom -- Department of Health/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 16;486(7403):400-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11017.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722201" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Breast Neoplasms/classification/*genetics/pathology ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/*genetics ; Cytosine/metabolism ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Female ; Humans ; JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism ; Mutagenesis/*genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neoplasm Grading ; Oncogenes/*genetics ; Reproducibility of Results ; Signal Transduction/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-10-14
    Description: Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a unique opportunity for regenerative medicine because they offer the prospect of generating unlimited quantities of cells for autologous transplantation, with potential application in treatments for a broad range of disorders. However, the use of human iPSCs in the context of genetically inherited human disease will require the correction of disease-causing mutations in a manner that is fully compatible with clinical applications. The methods currently available, such as homologous recombination, lack the necessary efficiency and also leave residual sequences in the targeted genome. Therefore, the development of new approaches to edit the mammalian genome is a prerequisite to delivering the clinical promise of human iPSCs. Here we show that a combination of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and piggyBac technology in human iPSCs can achieve biallelic correction of a point mutation (Glu342Lys) in the alpha(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT, also known as SERPINA1) gene that is responsible for alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency. Genetic correction of human iPSCs restored the structure and function of A1AT in subsequently derived liver cells in vitro and in vivo. This approach is significantly more efficient than any other gene-targeting technology that is currently available and crucially prevents contamination of the host genome with residual non-human sequences. Our results provide the first proof of principle, to our knowledge, for the potential of combining human iPSCs with genetic correction to generate clinically relevant cells for autologous cell-based therapies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3198846/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3198846/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yusa, Kosuke -- Rashid, S Tamir -- Strick-Marchand, Helene -- Varela, Ignacio -- Liu, Pei-Qi -- Paschon, David E -- Miranda, Elena -- Ordonez, Adriana -- Hannan, Nicholas R F -- Rouhani, Foad J -- Darche, Sylvie -- Alexander, Graeme -- Marciniak, Stefan J -- Fusaki, Noemi -- Hasegawa, Mamoru -- Holmes, Michael C -- Di Santo, James P -- Lomas, David A -- Bradley, Allan -- Vallier, Ludovic -- 077187/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- G0601840/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0701448/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0800784/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0901786/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- G1000847/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- WT077187/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Oct 12;478(7369):391-4. doi: 10.1038/nature10424.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21993621" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Hepatocytes/metabolism/transplantation ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*physiology ; Liver/cytology ; Mice ; Serum Albumin/genetics/metabolism ; *Targeted Gene Repair ; Time Factors ; alpha 1-Antitrypsin/*genetics/metabolism ; alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Abstract: Mouse transgenesis has provided fundamental insights into pancreatic cancer, but is limited by the long duration of allele/model generation. Here we show transfection-based multiplexed delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 to the pancreas of adult mice, allowing simultaneous editing of multiple gene sets in individual cells. We use the method to induce pancreatic cancer and exploit CRISPR/Cas9 mutational signatures for phylogenetic tracking of metastatic disease. Our results demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-multiplexing enables key applications, such as combinatorial gene-network analysis, in vivo synthetic lethality screening and chromosome engineering. Negative-selection screening in the pancreas using multiplexed-CRISPR/Cas9 confirms the vulnerability of pancreatic cells to Brca2-inactivation in a Kras-mutant context. We also demonstrate modelling of chromosomal deletions and targeted somatic engineering of inter-chromosomal translocations, offering multifaceted opportunities to study complex structural variation, a hallmark of pancreatic cancer. The low-frequency mosaic pattern of transfection-based CRISPR/Cas9 delivery faithfully recapitulates the stochastic nature of human tumorigenesis, supporting wide applicability for biological/preclinical research.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26916719
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  • 6
    Keywords: IN-VIVO ; intraepithelial neoplasia ; MOUSE MODEL ; K-RAS ; DUCTAL ADENOCARCINOMA ; ADULT MICE ; MAST-CELLS ; GENOME-WIDE ; RAS ONCOGENES ; ONCOGENIC KRAS
    Abstract: Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have dramatically improved our understanding of tumor evolution and therapeutic resistance. However, sequential genetic manipulation of gene expression and targeting of the host is almost impossible using conventional Cre-loxP-based models. We have developed an inducible dual-recombinase system by combining flippase-FRT (Flp-FRT) and Cre-loxP recombination technologies to improve GEMMs of pancreatic cancer. This enables investigation of multistep carcinogenesis, genetic manipulation of tumor subpopulations (such as cancer stem cells), selective targeting of the tumor microenvironment and genetic validation of therapeutic targets in autochthonous tumors on a genome-wide scale. As a proof of concept, we performed tumor cell-autonomous and nonautonomous targeting, recapitulated hallmarks of human multistep carcinogenesis, validated genetic therapy by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase inactivation as well as cancer cell depletion and show that mast cells in the tumor microenvironment, which had been thought to be key oncogenic players, are dispensable for tumor formation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25326799
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  • 7
    Keywords: GENOME ; T-CELLS ; MOUSE ; DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER ; EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS ; SOMATIC MUTAGENESIS ; CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE ; next-generation ; SLEEPING-BEAUTY ; CHROMOSOMAL TRANSPOSITION
    Abstract: Here we describe a conditional piggyBac transposition system in mice and report the discovery of large sets of new cancer genes through a pancreatic insertional mutagenesis screen. We identify Foxp1 as an oncogenic transcription factor that drives pancreatic cancer invasion and spread in a mouse model and correlates with lymph node metastasis in human patients with pancreatic cancer. The propensity of piggyBac for open chromatin also enabled genome-wide screening for cancer-relevant noncoding DNA, which pinpointed a Cdkn2a cis-regulatory region. Histologically, we observed different tumor subentities and discovered associated genetic events, including Fign insertions in hepatoid pancreatic cancer. Our studies demonstrate the power of genetic screening to discover cancer drivers that are difficult to identify by other approaches to cancer genome analysis, such as downstream targets of commonly mutated human cancer genes. These piggyBac resources are universally applicable in any tissue context and provide unique experimental access to the genetic complexity of cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25485836
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; SEQUENCE ; IDENTIFICATION ; ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA ; TWINS ; mosaicism ; MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES ; stem-cell niche ; DISEASE EVOLUTION
    Abstract: Clonal hemopoiesis driven by leukemia-associated gene mutations can occur without evidence of a blood disorder. To investigate this phenomenon, we interrogated 15 mutation hot spots in blood DNA from 4,219 individuals using ultra-deep sequencing. Using only the hot spots studied, we identified clonal hemopoiesis in 0.8% of individuals under 60, rising to 19.5% of those 〉/=90 years, thus predicting that clonal hemopoiesis is much more prevalent than previously realized. DNMT3A-R882 mutations were most common and, although their prevalence increased with age, were found in individuals as young as 25 years. By contrast, mutations affecting spliceosome genes SF3B1 and SRSF2, closely associated with the myelodysplastic syndromes, were identified only in those aged 〉70 years, with several individuals harboring more than one such mutation. This indicates that spliceosome gene mutations drive clonal expansion under selection pressures particular to the aging hemopoietic system and explains the high incidence of clonal disorders associated with these mutations in advanced old age.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25732814
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  • 9
  • 10
    Abstract: The diagnosis of hematologic malignancies relies on multidisciplinary workflows involving morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic analyses. Advances in cancer genomics have identified numerous recurrent mutations with clear prognostic and/or therapeutic significance to different cancers. In myeloid malignancies, there is a clinical imperative to test for such mutations in mainstream diagnosis; however, progress toward this has been slow and piecemeal. Here we describe Karyogene, an integrated targeted resequencing/analytical platform that detects nucleotide substitutions, insertions/deletions, chromosomal translocations, copy number abnormalities, and zygosity changes in a single assay. We validate the approach against 62 acute myeloid leukemia, 50 myelodysplastic syndrome, and 40 blood DNA samples from individuals without evidence of clonal blood disorders. We demonstrate robust detection of sequence changes in 49 genes, including difficult-to-detect mutations such as FLT3 internal-tandem and mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) partial-tandem duplications, and clinically significant chromosomal rearrangements including MLL translocations to known and unknown partners, identifying the novel fusion gene MLL-DIAPH2 in the process. Additionally, we identify most significant chromosomal gains and losses, and several copy neutral loss-of-heterozygosity mutations at a genome-wide level, including previously unreported changes such as homozygosity for DNMT3A R882 mutations. Karyogene represents a dependable genomic diagnosis platform for translational research and for the clinical management of myeloid malignancies, which can be readily adapted for use in other cancers.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27121471
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