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  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (14)
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (8)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-03-29
    Description: The Earth-Moon system likely formed as a result of a collision between two large planetary objects. Debate about their relative masses, the impact energy involved, and the extent of isotopic homogenization continues. We present the results of a high-precision oxygen isotope study of an extensive suite of lunar and terrestrial samples. We demonstrate that lunar rocks and terrestrial basalts show a 3 to 4 ppm (parts per million), statistically resolvable, difference in 17 O. Taking aubrite meteorites as a candidate impactor material, we show that the giant impact scenario involved nearly complete mixing between the target and impactor. Alternatively, the degree of similarity between the 17 O values of the impactor and the proto-Earth must have been significantly closer than that between Earth and aubrites. If the Earth-Moon system evolved from an initially highly vaporized and isotopically homogenized state, as indicated by recent dynamical models, then the terrestrial basalt-lunar oxygen isotope difference detected by our study may be a reflection of post–giant impact additions to Earth. On the basis of this assumption, our data indicate that post–giant impact additions to Earth could have contributed between 5 and 30% of Earth’s water, depending on global water estimates. Consequently, our data indicate that the bulk of Earth’s water was accreted before the giant impact and not later, as often proposed.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
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  • 2
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2018-08-17
    Description: We document rapid and abrupt clearings of large portions of the subtropical marine low cloud deck that have implications for the global radiation balance and climate sensitivity. Over the southeast Atlantic, large areas of stratocumulus are quickly eroded, yielding partial or complete clearing along sharp transitions hundreds to thousands of kilometers in length that move westward at 8 to 12 meters per second and travel as far as 1000+ kilometers from the African coast. The westward-moving cloudiness reductions have an annual peak in occurrence in the period from April through June. The cloud erosion boundaries reduce cloud at 10-kilometer scale in less than 15 minutes, move approximately perpendicular to the mean flow, and are often accompanied by small-scale wave features. Observations suggest that the cloud erosion is caused by atmospheric gravity waves.
    Keywords: Geochemistry, Geophysics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-01-15
    Description: Long-term population viability of Fraser River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) is threatened by unusually high levels of mortality as they swim to their spawning areas before they spawn. Functional genomic studies on biopsied gill tissue from tagged wild adults that were tracked through ocean and river environments revealed physiological profiles predictive of successful migration and spawning. We identified a common genomic profile that was correlated with survival in each study. In ocean-tagged fish, a mortality-related genomic signature was associated with a 13.5-fold greater chance of dying en route. In river-tagged fish, the same genomic signature was associated with a 50% increase in mortality before reaching the spawning grounds in one of three stocks tested. At the spawning grounds, the same signature was associated with 3.7-fold greater odds of dying without spawning. Functional analysis raises the possibility that the mortality-related signature reflects a viral infection.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Miller, Kristina M -- Li, Shaorong -- Kaukinen, Karia H -- Ginther, Norma -- Hammill, Edd -- Curtis, Janelle M R -- Patterson, David A -- Sierocinski, Thomas -- Donnison, Louise -- Pavlidis, Paul -- Hinch, Scott G -- Hruska, Kimberly A -- Cooke, Steven J -- English, Karl K -- Farrell, Anthony P -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 14;331(6014):214-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1196901.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Genetics Section, Pacific Biological Station, 3190 Hammond Bay Road, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6N7, Canada. kristi.miller@dfo-mpo.gc.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21233388" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Animal Migration ; Animals ; Canada ; Female ; Fish Diseases/genetics/immunology/mortality ; *Gene Expression ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; Genome ; Gills ; Male ; Mortality ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Pacific Ocean ; Population Dynamics ; Principal Component Analysis ; Remote Sensing Technology ; *Reproduction ; Rivers ; Salmon/*genetics/*physiology ; Stress, Physiological ; Survival Analysis ; Virus Diseases/genetics/immunology/mortality/veterinary
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-07-19
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Marrero, Juan Carlos Antuna -- Miller, M Meghan -- Mattioli, Glen -- Feaux, Karl -- Anthes, Richard -- Braun, John -- Wang, Guoquan -- Robock, Alan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 18;345(6194):278. doi: 10.1126/science.345.6194.278-a. Epub 2014 Jul 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Grupo de Optica Atmosferica de Camaguey, Centro Meteorologico de Camaguey, Instituto de Meteorologia de la Republica de Cuba, Cuba. ; UNAVCO, Boulder, CO 80301, USA. ; UNAVCO, Boulder, CO 80301, USA. mattioli@unavco.org. ; University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80305, USA. ; Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX 77004, USA. ; Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25035480" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *International Cooperation ; Science/*trends
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-11-28
    Description: Solar photoconversion in semiconductors is driven by charge separation at the interface of the semiconductor and contacting layers. Here we demonstrate that time-resolved photoinduced reflectance from a semiconductor captures interfacial carrier dynamics. We applied this transient photoreflectance method to study charge transfer at p-type gallium-indium phosphide (p-GaInP2) interfaces critically important to solar-driven water splitting. We monitored the formation and decay of transient electric fields that form upon photoexcitation within bare p-GaInP2, p-GaInP2/platinum (Pt), and p-GaInP2/amorphous titania (TiO2) interfaces. The data show that a field at both the p-GaInP2/Pt and p-GaInP2/TiO2 interfaces drives charge separation. Additionally, the charge recombination rate at the p-GaInP2/TiO2 interface is greatly reduced owing to its p-n nature, compared with the Schottky nature of the p-GaInP2/Pt interface.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yang, Ye -- Gu, Jing -- Young, James L -- Miller, Elisa M -- Turner, John A -- Neale, Nathan R -- Beard, Matthew C -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Nov 27;350(6264):1061-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3459.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, CO, 80401, USA. ye.yang@nrel.gov matt.beard@nrel.gov. ; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, CO, 80401, USA. ; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, CO, 80401, USA. Material Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26612947" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-05-07
    Description: In the adult central nervous system, the vasculature of the neurogenic niche regulates neural stem cell behavior by providing circulating and secreted factors. Age-related decline of neurogenesis and cognitive function is associated with reduced blood flow and decreased numbers of neural stem cells. Therefore, restoring the functionality of the niche should counteract some of the negative effects of aging. We show that factors found in young blood induce vascular remodeling, culminating in increased neurogenesis and improved olfactory discrimination in aging mice. Further, we show that GDF11 alone can improve the cerebral vasculature and enhance neurogenesis. The identification of factors that slow the age-dependent deterioration of the neurogenic niche in mice may constitute the basis for new methods of treating age-related neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123747/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123747/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Katsimpardi, Lida -- Litterman, Nadia K -- Schein, Pamela A -- Miller, Christine M -- Loffredo, Francesco S -- Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R -- Chen, John W -- Lee, Richard T -- Wagers, Amy J -- Rubin, Lee L -- 1DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 1R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- 5U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD004345/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG032977/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG033053/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG040019/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS070835/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS072167/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS070835/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS072167/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 9;344(6184):630-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1251141. Epub 2014 May 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24797482" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/*drug effects ; Animals ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*administration & dosage/blood/physiology ; Brain/blood supply/*drug effects ; Cerebrovascular Circulation/*drug effects ; Cognition/drug effects ; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/drug effects ; Growth Differentiation Factors/*administration & dosage/blood/physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neural Stem Cells/cytology/*drug effects ; Neurogenesis/*drug effects ; Olfactory Bulb/cytology/drug effects ; Parabiosis ; Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage ; *Rejuvenation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-06-14
    Description: Sediments cored along the southwestern Iberian margin during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 339 provide constraints on Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) circulation patterns from the Pliocene epoch to the present day. After the Strait of Gibraltar opened (5.33 million years ago), a limited volume of MOW entered the Atlantic. Depositional hiatuses indicate erosion by bottom currents related to higher volumes of MOW circulating into the North Atlantic, beginning in the late Pliocene. The hiatuses coincide with regional tectonic events and changes in global thermohaline circulation (THC). This suggests that MOW influenced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), THC, and climatic shifts by contributing a component of warm, saline water to northern latitudes while in turn being influenced by plate tectonics.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hernandez-Molina, F Javier -- Stow, Dorrik A V -- Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos A -- Acton, Gary -- Bahr, Andre -- Balestra, Barbara -- Ducassou, Emmanuelle -- Flood, Roger -- Flores, Jose-Abel -- Furota, Satoshi -- Grunert, Patrick -- Hodell, David -- Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco -- Kim, Jin Kyoung -- Krissek, Lawrence -- Kuroda, Junichiro -- Li, Baohua -- Llave, Estefania -- Lofi, Johanna -- Lourens, Lucas -- Miller, Madeline -- Nanayama, Futoshi -- Nishida, Naohisa -- Richter, Carl -- Roque, Cristina -- Pereira, Helder -- Sanchez Goni, Maria Fernanda -- Sierro, Francisco J -- Singh, Arun Deo -- Sloss, Craig -- Takashimizu, Yasuhiro -- Tzanova, Alexandrina -- Voelker, Antje -- Williams, Trevor -- Xuan, Chuang -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jun 13;344(6189):1244-50. doi: 10.1126/science.1251306.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK. javier.hernandez-molina@rhul.ac.uk. ; Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, Scotland, UK. ; International Ocean Discovery Program, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77845, USA. ; Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341, USA. ; Institute of Geosciences, University of Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany. ; Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; EPOC, Universite de Bordeaux, 33615 Pessac Cedex, France. ; School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. ; Departamento de Geologia, Universidad de Salamanca, 3008 Salamanca, Spain. ; Department of Natural History Sciences, Hokkaido University, N10W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan. ; Institute for Earth Sciences, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz, Austria. ; Godwin Laboratory for Palaeoclimate Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK. ; Department of Biogeochemistry, JAMSTEC, 237-0061 Yokosuka, Japan. ; Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology, Ansan 426-744, Korea. ; School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Institute for Frontier Research on Earth Evolution (IFREE), JAMSTEC, 2-15 Natsushima-Cho, Yokosuka-city, Kanagawa 237-0061, Japan. ; Department of Micropalaeontology, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, P.R. China. ; Instituto Geologico y Minero de Espana, Rios Rosas 23, 28003 Madrid, Spain. ; Geosciences Montpellier, Universite Montpellier II, 34090 Montpellier, France, and Department of Geology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK. ; Institute of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands. ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. ; Institute of Geology and Geoinformation, Geological Survey of Japan (AIST), Ibaraki 305-8567, Japan. ; School of Geosciences, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA. ; Divisao de Geologia e Georecursos Marinhos, IPMA, 1749-077 Lisboa, Portugal. ; Grupo de Biologia e Geologia, Escola Secundaria de Loule, 8100-740 Loule, Portugal. ; Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, EPOC, Universite de Bordeaux, 33615 Pessac, France. ; Department of Geology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India. ; School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland 4001, Australia. ; Department of Geology, Faculty of Education, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan. ; Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA. ; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA. ; Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926012" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Atlantic Ocean ; *Climate Change ; Mediterranean Sea ; Paleontology ; *Seawater ; *Water Movements
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Decreased expression of C9orf72 is seen in expansion carriers, suggesting that loss of function may play a role in disease. We found that two independent mouse lines lacking the C9orf72 ortholog (3110043O21Rik) in all tissues developed normally and aged without motor neuron disease. Instead, C9orf72 null mice developed progressive splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy with accumulation of engorged macrophage-like cells. C9orf72 expression was highest in myeloid cells, and the loss of C9orf72 led to lysosomal accumulation and altered immune responses in macrophages and microglia, with age-related neuroinflammation similar to C9orf72 ALS but not sporadic ALS human patient tissue. Thus, C9orf72 is required for the normal function of myeloid cells, and altered microglial function may contribute to neurodegeneration in C9orf72 expansion carriers.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉O'Rourke, J G -- Bogdanik, L -- Yanez, A -- Lall, D -- Wolf, A J -- Muhammad, A K M G -- Ho, R -- Carmona, S -- Vit, J P -- Zarrow, J -- Kim, K J -- Bell, S -- Harms, M B -- Miller, T M -- Dangler, C A -- Underhill, D M -- Goodridge, H S -- Lutz, C M -- Baloh, R H -- GM085796/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- NS069669/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS078398/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS087351/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- UL1TR000124/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1324-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf1064.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ; The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA. ; Division of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ; Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. ; Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. Department of Neurology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989253" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/immunology ; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/genetics/*immunology ; Animals ; Frontotemporal Dementia/genetics/*immunology ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors/genetics/*physiology ; Heterozygote ; Humans ; Lymphatic Diseases/genetics/immunology ; Macrophages/*immunology ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Microglia/*immunology ; Myeloid Cells/*immunology ; Proteins/genetics/*physiology ; Rats ; Splenomegaly/genetics/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-07-12
    Description: The contemporary Arctic carbon balance is uncertain, and the potential for a permafrost carbon feedback of anywhere from 50 to 200 petagrams of carbon (Schuur et al ., 2015) compromises accurate 21st-century global climate system projections. The 42-year record of atmospheric CO 2 measurements at Barrow, Alaska (71.29 N, 156.79 W), reveals significant trends in regional land-surface CO 2 anomalies (CO 2 ), indicating long-term changes in seasonal carbon uptake and respiration. Using a carbon balance model constrained by CO 2 , we find a 13.4% decrease in mean carbon residence time (50% confidence range = 9.2 to 17.6%) in North Slope tundra ecosystems during the past four decades, suggesting a transition toward a boreal carbon cycling regime. Temperature dependencies of respiration and carbon uptake suggest that increases in cold season Arctic labile carbon release will likely continue to exceed increases in net growing season carbon uptake under continued warming trends.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-03-07
    Description: The co-evolution of a supermassive black hole with its host galaxy through cosmic time is encoded in its spin. At z 〉 2, supermassive black holes are thought to grow mostly by merger-driven accretion leading to high spin. It is not known, however, whether below z approximately 1 these black holes continue to grow by coherent accretion or in a chaotic manner, though clear differences are predicted in their spin evolution. An established method of measuring the spin of black holes is through the study of relativistic reflection features from the inner accretion disk. Owing to their greater distances from Earth, there has hitherto been no significant detection of relativistic reflection features in a moderate-redshift quasar. Here we report an analysis of archival X-ray data together with a deep observation of a gravitationally lensed quasar at z = 0.658. The emission originates within three or fewer gravitational radii from the black hole, implying a spin parameter (a measure of how fast the black hole is rotating) of a = 0.87(+0.08)(-0.15) at the 3sigma confidence level and a 〉 0.66 at the 5sigma level. The high spin found here is indicative of growth by coherent accretion for this black hole, and suggests that black-hole growth at 0.5 〈/= z 〈/= 1 occurs principally by coherent rather than chaotic accretion episodes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Reis, R C -- Reynolds, M T -- Miller, J M -- Walton, D J -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 13;507(7491):207-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13031. Epub 2014 Mar 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24598545" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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