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1.
PAPER CURRENT
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: The cover image, by Alessio Cimmino et al., is based on the Special Issue Article Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: Absolute configuration and biological activity, DOI: 10.1002/chir.22719 . Photo Credit: Antonio Evidente.
Print ISSN: 0899-0042
Electronic ISSN: 1520-636X
Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
Published by Wiley-Blackwell
2.
PAPER CURRENT
Issue Information (2017)
Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: No abstract is available for this article.
Print ISSN: 0899-0042
Electronic ISSN: 1520-636X
Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
Published by Wiley-Blackwell
3.
PAPER CURRENT
Our planet wrapped in plastic (2017)
Elsevier
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: Publication date: 21 August 2017 Source: Current Biology, Volume 27, Issue 16 Author(s): Michael Gross Since 1950, the amount of synthetic polymers produced has increased exponentially and faster than the growth of the global economy. The amount of plastic waste that ends up in the environment is copying that curve, causing serious problems for wildlife. Plastic-bearing sediment layers may in the future help define the Anthropocene. Michael Gross reports. Teaser Since 1950, the amount of synthetic polymers produced has increased exponentially and faster than the growth of the global economy. The amount of plastic waste that ends up in the environment is copying that curve, causing serious problems for wildlife. Plastic-bearing sediment layers may in the future help define the Anthropocene.
Print ISSN: 0960-9822
Electronic ISSN: 1879-0445
Topics: Biology
Published by Elsevier on behalf of Cell Press.
4.
PAPER CURRENT
Jonathan Losos (2017)
Elsevier
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: Publication date: 21 August 2017 Source: Current Biology, Volume 27, Issue 16 Author(s): Jonathan Losos Teaser Evolutionary biologist Jonathan Losos in Q&A.
Print ISSN: 0960-9822
Electronic ISSN: 1879-0445
Topics: Biology
Published by Elsevier on behalf of Cell Press.
5.
PAPER CURRENT
Evidence from amber for the origins of termitophily (2017)
Elsevier
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: Publication date: 21 August 2017 Source: Current Biology, Volume 27, Issue 16 Author(s): Shûhei Yamamoto, Munetoshi Maruyama, Joseph Parker Fossil morphology is often used to infer the ecology of extinct species. In a recent report in Current Biology , Cai and colleagues [1] described an extinct rove beetle, Cretotrichopsenius burmiticus , from two specimens in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (∼99 million years old). Based on morphology and the taxonomic group to which the specimens belong, the authors proposed that Cretotrichopsenius was a termitophile — a socially parasitic symbiont of termite colonies. Moreover, the new taxon was claimed to represent the oldest “unequivocal” termitophile so far discovered, pushing back the known evolutionary history of termitophily by ∼80 million years, close to the origin of termite eusociality. Cretotrichopsenius is certainly an important discovery for understanding the evolutionary steps leading to this type of social insect symbiosis. However, we issue a caveat here concerning the authors’ assertion that Cretotrichopsenius was truly termitophilous. Additionally, we question the authors’ representation of a previously published, likely-termitophilous rove beetle in Burmese amber [2] . Teaser Yamamoto et al. assess the evidence in a recent paper by Cai and colleagues for early termitophilous insects in amber.
Print ISSN: 0960-9822
Electronic ISSN: 1879-0445
Topics: Biology
Published by Elsevier on behalf of Cell Press.
6.
PAPER CURRENT
Zygotic Genome Activation in Vertebrates (2017)
Elsevier
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: Publication date: 21 August 2017 Source: Developmental Cell, Volume 42, Issue 4 Author(s): David Jukam, S. Ali M. Shariati, Jan M. Skotheim The first major developmental transition in vertebrate embryos is the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) when maternal mRNAs are degraded and zygotic transcription begins. During the MZT, the embryo takes charge of gene expression to control cell differentiation and further development. This spectacular organismal transition requires nuclear reprogramming and the initiation of RNAPII at thousands of promoters. Zygotic genome activation (ZGA) is mechanistically coordinated with other embryonic events, including changes in the cell cycle, chromatin state, and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic component ratios. Here, we review progress in understanding vertebrate ZGA dynamics in frogs, fish, mice, and humans to explore differences and emphasize common features. Teaser The first major developmental transition in vertebrate embryos is the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) when maternal mRNAs are degraded and zygotic transcription begins. During the MZT, the embryo takes charge of gene expression to control cell differentiation and further development. This spectacular organismal transition requires nuclear reprogramming and the initiation of RNAPII at thousands of promoters. Zygotic genome activation (ZGA) is mechanistically coordinated with other embryonic events, including changes in the cell cycle, chromatin state, and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic component ratios. Here, we review progress in understanding vertebrate ZGA dynamics in frogs, fish, mice, and humans to explore differences and emphasize common features.
Print ISSN: 1534-5807
Electronic ISSN: 1878-1551
Topics: Biology , Medicine
Published by Elsevier on behalf of Cell Press.
7.
PAPER CURRENT
HBL1 Is a Human Long Noncoding RNA that Modulates Cardiomyocyte Development from Pluripotent Stem Cells by Counteracting MIR1 (2017)
Elsevier
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: Publication date: 21 August 2017 Source: Developmental Cell, Volume 42, Issue 4 Author(s): Juli Liu, Yang Li, Bo Lin, Yi Sheng, Lei Yang Cardiogenesis processes in human and animals have differential dynamics, suggesting the existence of species-specific regulators during heart development. However, it remains a challenge to discover the human-specific cardiac regulatory genes, given that most coding genes are conserved. Here, we report the identification of a human-specific long noncoding RNA, Heart Brake LncRNA 1 ( HBL1 ), which regulates cardiomyocyte development from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Overexpression of HBL1 repressed, whereas knockdown and knockout of HBL1 increased, cardiomyocyte differentiation from hiPSCs. HBL1 physically interacted with MIR1 in an AGO2 complex. Disruption of MIR1 binding sites in HBL1 showed an effect similar to that of HBL1 knockout. SOX2 bound to HBL1 promoter and activated its transcription. Knockdown of SOX2 in hiPSCs led to decreased HBL1 expression and increased cardiomyocyte differentiation efficiency. Thus, HBL1 plays a modulatory role in fine-tuning human-specific cardiomyocyte development by forming a regulatory network with SOX2 and MIR1 . Graphical abstract Teaser Liu et al. identify a human lncRNA HBL1 , which is conserved among nonhuman primates, but not other vertebrates, in the regulation of cardiomyocyte differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells. HBL1 physically interacts with MIR1 in an AGO2 complex to silence MIR1 activity and HBL1 is transcriptionally activated by SOX2.
Print ISSN: 1534-5807
Electronic ISSN: 1878-1551
Topics: Biology , Medicine
Published by Elsevier on behalf of Cell Press.
8.
PAPER CURRENT
Bis(μ-N,N-diallyldithiocarbamato)bis[(N,N-diallyldithiocarbamato)cadmium] (2017)
International Union of Crystallography (IUC)
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: The title compound, [Cd2(C7H10NS2)4], is a neutral dinuclear cadmium(II) complex bearing four bis N,N-diallyldithiocarbamate ligands coordinating to two CdII cations. In each of the monomeric subunits, there are four S atoms of two dithiocarbamate ligands [Cd—S = 2.5558 (3), 2.8016 (3), 2.6050 (3) and 2.5709 (3) Å] that coordinate to one CdII atom in a bidentate mode. The dimers are located over an inversion centre bridged by two additional bridging Cd—S bonds [2.6021 (3) Å], leading to a substantial distortion of the geometry of the monomeric subunit from the expected square-planar geometry. The five-coordinate environment around each of the CdII ions in the dimer is best described as substantially tetragonally distorted square pyramidal. The dithiocarbamate groups are themselves planar and are also coplanar with the CdII ions. The negative charge on these groups is delocalized by resonance across the S atoms bound to the CdII cation. This delocalization of the π electrons in the dithiocarbamate groups also extends to the C—N bonds as they reveal significant double bond character [C—N = 1.3213 (16) and 1.3333 (15) Å].
Keywords: crystal structurecadmium(II) complexN,N-diallylldithiocarbamate ligandsbridging dimeric structure
Electronic ISSN: 1600-5368
Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
9.
PAPER CURRENT
Crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis of aquabis(nicotinamide-κN1)bis(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoato-κO)zinc (2017)
International Union of Crystallography (IUC)
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: The asymmetric unit of the title complex, [Zn(C10H11O2)2(C6H6N2O)2(H2O)], contains one half of the complex molecule, and the ZnII cation and the water O atom lie on a twofold rotation axis. The ZnII cation is coordinated by two carboxylate O atoms of the two symmetry-related 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoate (TMB) anions and by the water O atom at distances of 2.0311 (16) and 2.076 (2) Å to form a slightly distorted trigonal–planar arrangement, while the distorted trigonal–bipyramidal coordination sphere is completed by the two pyridine N atoms of the two symmetry-related monodentate nicotinamide (NA) ligands at distances of 2.2066 (19) Å in the axial positions. In the crystal, molecules are linked via intermolecular N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds with R22(12), R33(10) and R33(16) ring motifs, forming a double-column structure running along the c-axis direction. The Hirshfeld surface analysis of the crystal structure indicates that the most important contributions for the crystal packing are from H...H (58.4%), H...C/C...H (20.3%) and H...O/O...H (18.3%) interactions.
Keywords: crystal structurezinctransition metal complex of benzoic acid and nicotinamide derivatives
Electronic ISSN: 1600-5368
Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences
10.
PAPER CURRENT
Crystal structures of hibiscus acid and hibiscus acid dimethyl ester isolated from Hibiscus sabdariffa (Malvaceae) (2017)
International Union of Crystallography (IUC)
Publication Date: 2017-08-23
Description: The biologically active title compounds have been isolated from Hibiscus sabdariffa plants, hibiscus acid as a dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate [systematic name: (2S,3R)-3-hydroxy-5-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrofuran-2,3-dicarboxylic acid dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate], C6H6O7·C2H6OS, (I), and hibiscus acid dimethyl ester [systematic name: dimethyl (2S,3R)-3-hydroxy-5-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrofuran-2,3-dicarboxylate], C8H10O7, (II). Compound (I) forms a layered structure with alternating layers of lactone and solvent molecules, that include a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding construct. Compound (II) has two crystallographically independent and conformationally similar molecules per asymmetric unit and forms a one-dimensional hydrogen-bonding construct. The known absolute configuration for both compounds has been confirmed.
Keywords: crystal structurenatural productshibiscuslactone acidshydrogen bonding
Electronic ISSN: 1600-5368
Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences