Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • DKFZ Publication Database  (6)
  • 1965 - 1969  (6)
Collection
Years
Year
  • 1
    Abstract: The fate of (3)H-thymidine-labeled adenovirus type 12 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was studied in Nil-2 cells of Syrian hamster origin. It was found that a substantial fraction of (3)H-adenovirus type 12 DNA became degraded within 24 hr after infection and was released into the culture fluid. After infection of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR)-prelabeled cells with (3)H-adenovirus type 12, viral DNA became readily separable from cellular DNA by equilibrium centrifugation in CsCl. Part of the viral radioactivity was found to shift gradually to the position of cellular DNA as time progressed after infection. When exponentially growing cells were exposed simultaneously to BUdR, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, and (3)H-adenovirus type 12, up to 50% of the viral radioactivity shifted within 24 hr from the density of viral DNA to that of cellular DNA after equilibrium centrifugation in CsCl. Upon denaturation of the cellular DNA, the isotope was preferentially found to be associated with the "heavy" strand which was synthesized after infection. Upon hybridization of the "heavy" and the "light" strands with sonically treated, denatured (3)H-adenovirus type 12 DNA, small and nearly equal amounts of counts hybridized with both strands. The number of counts annealed was in a range similar to that of those annealed with the same amount of DNA derived from adenovirus type 12-transformed hamster cells. These results demonstrate that (i) a substantial proportion of the adsorbed virus becomes degraded within 24 hr; (ii) part of the degradation products is reutilized for cellular DNA synthesis; (iii) only a small fraction, mainly fragments, of viral DNA becomes integrated into both the newly synthesized and the parental strands of cellular DNA.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16789102
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Abstract: The induction of chromosomal aberrations by herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the interaction between viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and chromosomes have been studied (i) by infection of the BHK-21 line of hamster kidney cells at multiplicities ranging from 0.5 to 100 followed by 1-hr pulses of (3)H-thymidine preceding preparation at varying intervals of metaphases and autoradiography, and (ii) by use of (3)H-thymidine-labeled HSV for infection, chromosomal, and autoradiographic analyses at intervals thereafter. The results revealed that (i) chromosomal lesions develop prior to, and thus are independent of, viral DNA synthesis; (ii) HSV is capable of replicating in cells during the late G-2 period or in metaphase; (iii) most of the viral DNA remains unassociated with chromosomes and is not detectable at sites of chromosomal lesions; (iv) the capacity of the virus to cause chromosomal aberrations is four times less sensitive to inactivation by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation than its infectious property; and (v) after large doses of UV, invasion of the nuclei by the irradiated virus is reduced. These observations indicate that the chromosomal lesions induced by HSV result most likely from action of an early enzyme under control of the viral genome. This explanation is proposed also for the effects of adenovirus type 12 on chromosomes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 4302015
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: Induction of T antigen by adenovirus type 12 was studied in growing and growth-inhibited cultures of the Nil-2 line of Syrian hamster cells. At a viral input multiplicity of 10, neoantigen was present in 100% of the cells by 24 hr. T antigen gradually disappeared in descendants of these cells so that 2 weeks after infection only 1% gave specific immunofluorescence. When cellular replication was prevented by addition of fluorodeoxyuridine, T antigen persisted in all cells for the 2-week period. Upon infection of growing cultures with purified (3)H-labeled adenovirus type 12 and autoradiographic analysis of the cells at various times thereafter, a gradual reduction in labeled nuclear loci was noted which paralleled the decrease in T antigen-containing cells. In nongrowing cultures, no change in labeled loci was noted. Correlation of T antigen and labeled loci revealed that fluorescent cells contained, on the average, about 10 times more silver grains than nonfluorescent cells. All of 92 preselected fluorescent cells showed labeled loci, whereas, of 100 nonfluorescent cells, 18 were free of silver grains. The implications of these findings are discussed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 4302189
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Abstract: Preparations of purified (3)H-labeled adenovirus type 12 ((3)H-Ad. 12) were analyzed for radioactive impurities by Millipore filtration and ultracentrifugation. It was found that only about 1% of the isotope activity was separable from the virions. Exposure of hamster cell lines to (3)H-Ad. 12 resulted in nonlytic infections, and autoradiography indicated that viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), or parts thereof, became associated with host cell chromosomes. Usually, the label was observed in the form of small clusters of grains, as described previously for lytic adenovirus infections of human embryonic kidney cells. The uptake of labeled virus by the PT-K1 line of ratkangaroo cells was close to background level. These cells did not adsorb the virus to any significant extent. Ultraviolet irradiation of the virus for as long as 8 min did not affect viral adsorption onto susceptible cells, nor did it alter the association of viral DNA with host cell chromosomes. The capacity of the virus to induce chromosomal aberrations decreased linearly with an increase in the dose of irradiation, but the decrease occurred at a rate which was four- to fivefold slower than the rate of inactivation of viral infectivity. These results suggest that the capacity to induce chromosomal aberrations is controlled by viral genes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 4911853
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Abstract: Cultured Burkitt cells were examined by immunofluorescence, autoradiography, and electron microscopy in an effort to identify the stainable cells with those harboring herpes-type virus particles. Immediately after a 2-hr pulse of (3)H-thymidine, from 30 to 60% of the cells revealed heavy nuclear labeling. In most cases the grains were evenly dispersed, but in about 3 to 5% the grains showed a focal distribution and occasionally they extended into the cytoplasm. Such nuclear foci were rarely seen at 8 hr after the pulse. When the analysis was restricted to preselected immunofluorescent cells, up to 80% showed label at 8 hr and cytoplasmic grains were prominent. To reduce cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, cells were X-irradiated with 3,000 to 6,000 R, and the isotope pulse was applied 1, 4, or 7 days later. Whereas the total number of labeled cells decreased in roughly twofold steps at the respective intervals (from 40 to 10%), the incorporation of (3)H-thymidine into fluorescent cells was not affected by X irradiation. In each series, about 70% of the fluorescent cells contained label when they were examined at 24 and 48 hr after the pulse, whereas at 8 and 72 hr fewer were positive. At the earlier intervals, unlabeled fluorescent cells most likely represented cells which had completed viral DNA synthesis prior to the pulse; at the later intervals, unlabeled fluorescent cells were probably cells which commenced viral replication after the pulse. These data support the conclusion that the immunofluorescent cells are the ones which harbor virus, and also confirm the expectation that the virus is a DNA virus from a member of the herpes group. This conclusion was firmly established by sectioning and electron microscopic examination of individual fluorescent cells, all of which contained numerous virus particles, whereas the nonstained cells prepared in a similar manner were free of them.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 4316231
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Abstract: Nonrandom chromosomal breaks in chromosomes 1 and 17 were provoked in human embryonic kidney cells 24 hr after infection with adenovirus type 12. These chromosomal changes disappeared in persistently infected cultures. Neutralization of the virus with type-specific antiviral serum prior to infection prevented the occurrence of chromosomal aberrations. No viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, as determined by autoradiography, was seen in metaphases containing adenovirus type 12-induced chromosomal aberrations. Ultraviolet irradiation of the virus reduced chromosomal aberrations linearly. This reduction in aberrations was fourfold slower than the inactivation of viral infectivity. At 24 hr after infection of cells with purified (3)H-labeled adenovirus type 12, the isotope was found to be associated with the nuclei. The uptake of isotope was reduced ninefold when the labeled virus was neutralized with type-specific antiviral serum. This difference is considered to account for neutralization of labeled virions. In metaphases infected with labeled viruses, most of the clustered grains were seen only on one arm of the chromatid, even after 72 hr. Isochromatid labeling was found, however, in a small percentage of chromosomes, and increased with time after infection. This increase was threefold between 24 and 72 hr after infection, whereas the mean grain counts decreased twofold during the same period. This has been tentatively interpreted to mean that most of the viral DNA molecules or parts thereof are merely attached to cellular chromatin, but a small fraction of them becomes gradually integrated as time proceeds. Certain chromosomal sites appeared to be preferentially labeled when chromosome 2 was used as a model for evaluation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 5621489
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...