Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Tumor hypoxia is associated with poor prognosis and outcome and can be visualized using 18F-MISO-positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate the correlation between biological markers and biological imaging in a group of patients in whom a correlation between biological imaging and outcome has previously been demonstrated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a prospective pilot project, 16 patients with locally advanced cancer of the head and neck underwent 18F-MISO-PET scans before and during primary radiochemotherapy in addition to 18F-FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT). Tumor biopsies were stained for three tissue-based markers (Ku80, CAIX, CD44); in addition, human papillomavirus (HPV) status was assessed. H-scores of marker expression were generated and the results were correlated with the biological imaging and clinical outcome. RESULTS: No statistically significant correlation was established between the H-scores for Ku80, CD44 and CAIX or between any of the H-scores and the imaging variables (tumor volume on 18F-FDG-PET in ml, hypoxic subvolume as assessed by 18F-MISO-PET in ml, and SUVmax tumor/SUVmean muscle during the 18F-MISO-PET). A statistically significant negative correlation was found between CD44 H-score and HPV status (p = .004). Cox regression analysis for overall survival and recurrence-free survival showed one significant result for CAIX being associated with improved overall survival [hazard ratio 0.96 (0.93-1.00), p = .047]. CONCLUSION: Expression of Ku80, CAIX and CD44 as assessed by immunohistochemistry of tumor biopsies were not correlated to one another or the biological imaging data. However, there was a significant influence of CAIX on overall survival and between CD44 and HPV.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27593107
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Exercise during and after breast cancer treatment has shown several health benefits. However, little is known about the courses, patterns, and determinants of physical activity of breast cancer patients, and the role of exercise interventions on their physical activity behavior in the long run. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Self-reported physical activity was assessed in 227 breast cancer survivors before, during, and three, six, and 12 months post-intervention within two randomized resistance exercise trials performed during adjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy, respectively, with similar designs. Multiple ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to identify determinants of physical activity at these time points. RESULTS: While the intervention group exercised a median 1.8 h/week during adjuvant therapy (interquartile range 1.4-2.5), 68% of controls did not engage in any exercise. At 12-months follow-up 32% of patients did not engage in any exercise irrespective of the intervention. Of the patients who cycled for transportation pre-diagnosis about half stopped cycling in the long term in both groups. In contrast, walking was maintained over time. Major determinants of low levels of exercise at 12-months follow-up were low pre-diagnosis levels of exercise, lower education, being postmenopausal, and having breast problems or depressive symptoms. Further, the intervention appeared to influence the type of sports performed, with strength exercise being the most common type of exercise at follow-up in the exercise group, more frequently compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: The exercise intervention effectively countervailed the decrease in physical activity during cancer therapy and boosted strength exercise in the months following the intervention, but in the longer term many survivors were insufficiently active. Breast cancer survivors may need continued motivation and practical support tailored to their individual characteristics and physical activity history to incorporate exercise in everyday routine in the long term.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28084890
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: The interplay effect might degrade the dose of pencil beam scanning proton therapy to a degree that free-breathing treatment might be impossible without further motion mitigation techniques, which complicate and prolong the treatment. We assessed whether treatment of free-breathing patients without motion mitigation is feasible. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For 40 lung cancer patients, 4DCT datasets and individual breathing patterns were used to simulate 4D dynamic dose distributions of 3D treatment plans over 33 fractions delivered with an IBA universal nozzle. Evaluation was done by assessing under- and overdosage in the target structure using the parameters V90, V95, V98, D98, D2, V107 and V110. The impact of using beam-specific target volumes and the impact of changes in motion and patient anatomy in control 4DCTs were assessed. RESULTS: Almost half of the patients had tumour motion amplitudes of less than 5 mm. Under- and overdosage was significantly smaller for patients with tumour motion below 5 mm compared to patients with larger motion (2% vs. 13% average absolute reduction of V95, 2% vs. 8% average increase in V107, p 〈 .01). Simulating a 33-fraction treatment, the dose degradation was reduced but persisted for patients with tumour motion above 5 mm (average DeltaV95 of 〈1% vs. 3%, p 〈 .01). Beam-specific target volumes reduced the dose degradation in a fractionated treatment, but were more relevant for large motion. Repeated 4DCT revealed that changes in tumour motion during treatment might result in unexpected large dose degradations. CONCLUSION: Tumour motion amplitude is an indicator of dose degradation caused by the interplay effect. Fractionation reduces the dose degradation allowing the unmitigated treatment of patients with small tumour motions of less than 5 mm. The beam-specific target approach improves the dose coverage. The tumour motion and position needs to be assessed during treatment for all patients, to quickly react to possible changes, which might require treatment adaptation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28760089
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; ONCOLOGY ; genetics ; etiology ; CANCERS ; HERITABLE CAUSES
    Type of Publication: Meeting abstract published
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    Acta Oncologica 42 (8), 809-815 
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; FOLLOW-UP ; screening ; DEATH ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; DRUG ; primary ; REDUCTION ; BODY-WEIGHT ; prevention ; secondary prevention ; HEALTH ; lifestyle ; colorectal cancer ; FECAL-OCCULT-BLOOD ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; RATES ; STRATEGIES ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; CALCIUM ; aspirin ; NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ; chemoprevention ; RANDOMIZED TRIAL ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; AUSTRALIA ; EUROPE ; HABITS ; BETA-CAROTENE ; DIETARY HABITS ; ageing ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; FAMILIAL ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS ; RECTAL-CANCER ; SCREENING SIGMOIDOSCOPY
    Abstract: Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem: there are nearly one million cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed worldwide each year and half a million deaths. The geographic distribution of colorectal cancer follows the division between westernized versus developing countries. The highest rates are in North America, Australia and Europe. Rates in Africa and Asia are low, but are increasing in countries adopting western-style dietary habits. Given that the majority of cancers occur in older people, and with the ageing of the population in mind, this observation adds impetus to investigating prevention strategies to avoid some of this increase. High vegetable and fruit consumption has been associated with decreased risk of colorectal cancer in numerous observational studies, while high fibre intake seems to have a similar effect. Promising data have been obtained for aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and dietary calcium. A physically active lifestyle and maintenance of normal body weight are behavioural tools for prevention of colorectal cancer. Faecal occult blood testing has been shown to be effective in the prevention of about 20% of deaths from colorectal cancer, but few population-based screening programs have been initiated. Sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are potentially effective screening modalities; however, no randomized trial data have yet been reported. Overall, primary and secondary prevention, chemoprevention and screening research and implementation of these prevention strategies are priorities for reduction of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14968941
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; DEATH ; HISTORY ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; FAMILY ; prognosis ; MEMBERS ; NO ; EXPERIENCE ; BRCA1 ; family history ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; SWEDEN ; DATABASE ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; CARCINOMAS ; PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ; PROGNOSTIC-SIGNIFICANCE ; CANCER PATIENTS ; PROGNOSTIC FACTOR ; MANAGEMENT ; ONCOLOGY ; FAMILIES ; overall survival ; PROGNOSTIC-FACTOR ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; EPITHELIAL TUMORS ; HISTOLOGY ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; CANCERS ; COMMUNITY ; NORWAY ; hazard ratio ; FAMILY-MEMBERS ; SWEDISH ; CONCORDANCE
    Abstract: Introduction. Earlier studies suggest that histology has no prognostic significance in patients with invasive ovarian tumors. Studies about the effect of family history on survival have given conflicting results, which we try to clarify in this study. As an additional question, we examined whether family members share survival experience. Methods. We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for cause-specific and overall survival in ovarian cancer patients by histology and family history. HRs show the probability of death in the study group compared to the reference group. Results. A total of 6 049 ovarian cancer patients with specific histologies were retrieved from our Database from years 1993 to 1999. Compared to women with epithelial ovarian cancer, women with borderline epithelial tumors had the best survival (HR 0.02 and 0.14 for cause-specific and overall survival). Good survival was also noted for patients with sex cordstromal tumors and germ cell tumors. Among specific subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancers, good survival was noted for women with clear cell and endometrioid carcinomas and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. The study covered 80 mother-daughter pairs with a family history. Patients with a family history had a poorer survival than sporadic cases in both maternal and offspring generations. When the survival was analyzed according to the probands' length of survival, there was a nonsignificant concordance of prognosis. Conclusion. Our data showed that histology and family history are prognostic factors for ovarian tumors. Patients with a family history had a more aggressive course than the sporadic cases
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18607880
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) have a poor prognosis and there is no defined standard of care. High levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressed in HGG make the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (BEV) of particular interest. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In an ongoing registry data were collected from patients who have received BEV for the treatment of recurrent HGG. The primary objective was the identification of any clinical benefit as assessed by change in Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), decreased steroid use and duration of treatment. RESULTS: Two hundred and twenty-five patients with HGG were included (176 glioblastoma; 49 anaplastic glioma; median age 52 years). KPS improved in 10% of patients and remained stable in 68%. Steroids were stopped in 37.6% of patients. Median duration of treatment was 5.5 months; 19.1% of patients were treated for more than 12 months. Median overall survival from beginning of BEV treatment was 8.5 months. At the time of analysis, 169 patients (75.1%) had died and 56 patients (24.9%) were alive. Only 21 patients (9.3%) discontinued treatment due to toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data reveal valuable palliation with preservation of KPS and an option for steroid withdrawal in patients treated with BEV, supporting the role of this therapy in late-stage disease.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21495907
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: POPULATION ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; TRENDS ; PERIOD ANALYSIS ; UP-TO-DATE ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI STRAINS
    Abstract: Background. Esophagus and stomach cancers are associated with poor prognosis. But most published population-based cancer survival estimates for stomach and esophagus cancer refer to survival experience of patients diagnosed in the 1990s or earlier years. The aim of this study was to provide up-to-date survival estimates and trends for patients with stomach and esophagus cancer in Germany. Material and methods. Our analysis is based on data from 11 population-based cancer registries, covering 33 million inhabitants. Patients diagnosed with stomach and esophagus cancer in 1997-2006 were included. Period analysis was used to derive five-year relative survival estimates and trends by age, sex, cancer subsite, and stage for the time period of 2002-2006. German and US survival estimates were compared utilizing the SEER 13 database. Results. Overall age-standardized five-year relative survival was 31.8% and 18.3% for stomach and esophagus cancer, respectively, compared to 27.2% and 17.4% in the US. Survival was somewhat higher among female than among male patients for both cancer sites (33.6% vs. 30.6% and 21.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively) and much higher for non-cardia stomach cancer (40.4%) than for cardia cancer (23.4%). From 2002 to 2006, a moderate increase in five-year relative survival by 2.7 percent units was observed for non-cardia stomach cancer patients in Germany (p 〈 0.001). Conclusion. Five-year relative cancer survival has reached levels around 40% for patients with non-cardia stomach cancer in Germany in the early 21st century, whereas it remained at lower levels around 20% for patients with esophagus and cardia cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22524212
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Keywords: neoplasms ; POPULATION ; PERFORMANCE ; UPDATE ; colonoscopy ; OCCULT BLOOD-TESTS ; ADENOMA DETECTION ; AVERAGE RISK ; CUTOFF LEVELS
    Abstract: Background. Faecal immunochemical tests (FITs) for haemoglobin are increasingly used for non-invasive screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) but large scale comparative studies of different FITs for detection of CRC, overall and by stage, are sparse. We aimed to determine and compare performance of different FITs for the detection of CRC, and to assess their stage-specific sensitivities. Material and methods. We assessed sensitivity, specificity and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for six qualitative FITs among 74 CRC cases (59% stage I or II cancers) and 1480 controls free of colorectal neoplasm. Overall and stage-specific receiver operating characteristic curves were derived for three quantitative FITs. The areas under the curves (AUCs) were calculated and compared. Results. Pairs of overall sensitivity and specificity of the qualitative FITs ranged from 66% and 96% to 92% and 62%, respectively. For the three quantitative tests, AUCs ranged from 0.90 to 0.92, with sensitivities ranging from 80% to 87% at cut-offs yielding 90% specificity. AUCs ranged from 0.85 to 0.92, 0.94 to 0.96, and 0.86 to 0.93 for stage I, stage II and advanced stages (stage III and IV) cancers, respectively. At a specificity of 90%, the tests detected 65%-85% of stage I cancers. Conclusion. The diagnostic performance of FITs regarding detection of CRC is promising, even though the pre-defined cut-offs of some of the qualitative FITs need to be adjusted to limit false-positive rates in screening setting. At cut-off levels yielding 90% specifi city, the quantitative tests detected the vast majority of CRCs, even at early stages.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23617541
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...