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  • 1
    Abstract: Evidence indicates that gaining weight in adult life is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal cancer; however, biological mechanisms that may explain this association remain unclear. We evaluated the mediation effect of 20 different biomarkers on the relationship between adult weight gain and colorectal cancer, using data from a prospective nested case-control study of 452 incident cases diagnosed between 1992 and 2003 and matched within risk sets to 452 controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The proportions of mediated effects (%) were estimated on the basis of differences in percent effect changes in conditional logistic regression models with and without additional adjustment for individual biomarkers. Greater adult weight gain (〉/=300 g/year vs. 〈300 g/year) was associated with a higher risk of colon cancer (multivariable-adjusted relative risk = 1.54, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 2.24) but not rectal cancer (relative risk = 1.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 1.66). This association was accounted for mostly by attained waist circumference (reduction of 61%) and by the biomarkers soluble leptin receptor (reduction of 43%) and glycated hemoglobin (reduction of 28%). These novel data suggest that the observed association between adult weight gain and colon cancer could be primarily explained by attained abdominal fatness and biomarkers of metabolic dysfunction.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28387787
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  • 2
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; TIME ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; BETA ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; time trends ; TRENDS ; EUROPE ; DENMARK ; BREAST-CANCER RISK ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; STANDARD ; ADULT ; RE ; DETERMINANTS ; BODY-SIZE ; HEIGHT ; PARTICIPANTS ; BIRTH ; body height ; menarche ; SECULAR TRENDS ; URINE ESTROGENS
    Abstract: In the last two centuries, age at menarche has decreased in several European populations, whereas adult height has increased. It is unclear whether these trends have ceased in recent years or how age at menarche and height are related in individuals. In this study, the authors first investigated trends in age at menarche and adult height among 286,205 women from nine European countries by computing the mean age at menarche and height in 5-year birth cohorts, adjusted for differences in socioeconomic status. Second, the relation between age at menarche and height was estimated by linear regression models, adjusted for age at enrollment between 1992 and 1998 and socioeconomic status. Mean age at menarche decreased by 44 days per 5-year birth cohort (beta = -0.12, standard error = 0.002), varying from 18 days in the United Kingdom to 58 days in Spain and Germany. Women grew 0.29 cm taller per 5-year birth cohort (standard error = 0.007), varying from 0.42 cm in Italy to 0.98 cm in Denmark. Furthermore, women grew approximately 0.31 cm taller when menarche occurred 1 year later (range by country: 0.13-0.50 cm). Based on time trends, more recent birth cohorts have their menarche earlier and grow taller. However, women with earlier menarche reach a shorter adult height compared with women who have menarche at a later age
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16107566
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; neoplasms ; RISK ; TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; MALIGNANCIES ; WOMEN ; MEN ; leukemia ; cancer risk ; CARCINOGENS ; hair dyes ; case-control studies ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; MALIGNANCY ; PRODUCTS ; HUMAN CANCER ; INCREASE ; INTERVAL ; odds ratio ; population-based ; CANCER-RISK ; lymphatic system
    Abstract: Hair dyes have been evaluated as possibly being mutagenic and carcinogenic in animals. Studies of the association between human cancer risk and use of hair dyes have yielded inconsistent results. The authors evaluated the risk of lymphoid malignancies associated with personal use of hair dyes. The analysis included 2,302 incident cases of lymphoid neoplasms and 2,417 hospital- or population-based controls from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, and Spain (1998-2003). Use of hair dyes was reported by 74% of women and 7% of men. Lymphoma risk among dye users was significantly increased by 19% in comparison with never use (odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 1.41) and by 26% among persons who used hair dyes 12 or more times per year (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.60; p for linear trend = 0.414). Lymphoma risk was significantly higher among persons who had started coloring their hair before 1980 (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.72) and persons who had used hair dyes only before 1980 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.40). Personal use of hair dyes is associated with a moderate increase in lymphoma risk, particularly among women and persons who used dyes before 1980. Specific compounds associated with this risk remain to be elucidated
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16731576
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; GENES ; familial risk ; MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS ; RE ; multiple sclerosis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16554342
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; radiotherapy ; carcinoma ; human ; neoplasms ; DIAGNOSIS ; RISK ; PATIENT ; kidney ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; LYMPHOMA ; AGE ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; risk factors ; CERVICAL-CANCER ; RATES ; cancer risk ; REGISTRATION ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; adenocarcinoma ; TOBACCO ; pancreatic cancer ; LONG-TERM SURVIVORS ; YOUNG ; REGISTRY ; REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; cancer registries ; TESTICULAR CANCER ; LYMPHOMAS ; cancer registry ; pooled analysis ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; REGISTRIES ; CANCER-DIAGNOSIS ; pancreatic neoplasms ; MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS ; neoplasms,second primary
    Abstract: Studies of pancreatic cancer in the setting of second primary malignant neoplasms can provide etiologic clues. An international multicenter study was carried out using data from 13 cancer registries with a registration period up to year 2000. Cancer patients were followed up from the initial cancer diagnosis, and the occurrence of second primary malignant neoplasms was compared with expected values derived from local rates, adjusting for age, sex, and period of diagnosis. Results from individual registries were pooled by use of a fixed-effects model. People were at higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer within 10 years of a diagnosis of cancers of the pharynx, stomach, gallbladder, larynx, lung, cervix, corpus uteri, bladder, and eye and 10 years or later following a diagnosis of cancers of the stomach, colon, gallbladder, breast, cervix, placenta, corpus uteri, ovary, testis, bladder, kidney, and eye, as well as Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Pancreatic cancer was connected with smoking-related cancers, confirming the etiologic role of tobacco. The associations with uterine and ovarian cancers suggest that reproductive factors might be implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis. The elevated pancreatic cancer risk in young patients observed among several types of cancer implies a role of genetic factors. Radiotherapy is also suggested as a risk factor
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16421239
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  • 6
    Keywords: brain ; tumor ; Germany ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; meningioma ; TUMORS ; validation ; PATIENT ; AGE ; REGIONS ; HEAD ; case-control studies ; brain neoplasms ; case-control study ; population-based case-control study ; REGISTRY ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; GLIOMA ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; GENDER ; CANCERS ; REGISTRIES ; population-based ; electromagnetic fields ; telephone ; cellular phone ; TELEPHONE USE
    Abstract: The widespread use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible adverse health effects, particularly brain tumors. In this population-based case-control study carried out in three regions of Germany, all incident cases of glioma and meningioma among patients aged 30-69 years were ascertained during 2000-2003. Controls matched on age, gender, and region were randomly drawn from population registries. In total, 366 glioma cases, 381 meningioma cases, and 1,494 controls were interviewed. Overall use of a cellular phone was not associated with brain tumor risk; the respective odds ratios were 0.98 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74, 1.29) for glioma and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.62, 1.13) for meningioma. Among persons who had used cellular phones for 10 or more years, increased risk was found for glioma (odds ratio = 2.20, 95% CI: 0.94, 5.11) but not for meningioma (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.35, 3.37). No excess of temporal glioma (p = 0.41) or meningioma (p = 0.43) was observed in cellular phone users as compared with nonusers. Cordless phone use was not related to either glioma risk or meningioma risk. In conclusion, no overall increased risk of glioma or meningioma was observed among these cellular phone users; however, for long-term cellular phone users, results need to be confirmed before firm conclusions can be drawn
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; THERAPY ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; hormone ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; DIET ; DIETARY ; FAT ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; AUSTRALIA ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; dietary fiber ; insulin ; IGF-I ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; THERAPIES ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; USA ; prospective ; INSULIN SENSITIVITY ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; FOODS ; Nutrition Assessment ; postmenopausal ; DIANA RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; dietary carbohydrates ; endometrial neoplasms ; glycemic index ; IOWA WOMENS HEALTH
    Abstract: The associations of dietary total carbohydrates, overall glycemic index, total dietary glycemic load, total sugars, total starch, and total fiber with endometrial cancer risk were analyzed among 288,428 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (1992-2004), including 710 incident cases diagnosed during a mean 6.4 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant associations with endometrial cancer risk for increasing quartile intakes of any of the exposure variables. However, in continuous models calibrated by using 24-hour recall values, the multivariable relative risks were 1.61 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.45) per 100 g/day of total carbohydrates, 1.40 (95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.99) per 50 units/day of total dietary glycemic load, and 1.36 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.76) per 50 g/day of total sugars. These associations were stronger among women who had never used postmenopausal hormone therapy compared with ever users (total carbohydrates P-heterogeneity = 0.04). Data suggest no association of overall glycemic index, total starch, and total fiber with risk, and a possible modest positive association of total carbohydrates, total dietary glycemic load, and total sugars with risk, particularly among never users of hormone replacement therapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17670911
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; LUNG-CANCER ; DISEASE ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; HEALTH ; smoking ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; case-control studies ; lung neoplasms ; glutathione-S-transferase ; case-control study ; WORLDWIDE ; review ; METAANALYSIS ; GENOTYPE ; CHINESE POPULATION ; PUBLICATION BIAS ; DNA ADDUCT LEVELS ; NULL-GENOTYPE ; Asian continental ancestry group ; glutathione S-transferase pi ; GSTP1 ; HONG-KONG ; P1 POLYMORPHISMS ; PI-GENE
    Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide. Polymorphisms in genes associated with carcinogen metabolism may modulate risk of disease. Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1) detoxifies polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in cigarette smoke and is the most highly expressed glutathione S-transferase in lung tissue. A polymorphism in the GSTP1 gene, an A-to-G transition in exon 5 (Ile105Val, 313A -〉 313G), results in lower activity among individuals who carry the valine allele. The authors present a meta- and a pooled analysis of case-control studies that examined the association between this polymorphism in GSTP1 and lung cancer risk (27 studies, 8,322 cases and 8,844 controls and 15 studies, 4,282 cases and 5,032 controls, respectively). Overall, the meta-analysis found no significant association between lung cancer risk and the GSTP1 exon 5 polymorphism. In the pooled analysis, there was an overall association (odds ratio = 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.21) between lung cancer and carriage of the GSTP1 Val/Val or Ile/Val genotype compared with those carrying the Ile/Ile genotype. Increased risk varied by histologic type in Asians. There appears to be evidence for interaction between amount of smoking, the GSTP1 exon 5 polymorphism, and risk of lung cancer in whites
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19240225
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; carcinoma ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; CARCINOMAS ; body mass index ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; WEIGHT ; BODY-SIZE ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; metabolic syndrome ; blood pressure ; SERUM-LEVELS ; prospective ; CORONARY HEART-DISEASE ; INCREASED RISK ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; C-PEPTIDE ; BODY-MASS ; endometrial neoplasms ; journals ; AGED NORWEGIAN MEN ; metabolic syndrome X
    Abstract: The authors examined the association between the metabolic syndrome and risk of incident endometnal and fatal uterine corpus cancer within a large prospective cohort study Approximately 290,000 women from Austria, Norway, and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements of height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and circulating levels of glucose, total cholesterol, and tnglycendes Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The metabolic syndrome was assessed as a composite z score, as the standardized sum of z scores for body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and tnglycendes. A total of 917 endonnetnal carcinomas and 129 fatal cancers were identified Increased risks of incident endometnal carcinoma and fatal uterine corpus cancer were seen for the metabolic syndrome factors combined, as well as for individual factors (except for cholesterol) The relative risk of endometnal carcinoma for the metabolic syndrome was 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1 28, 1 46) per 1-unit increment of z score The positive associations between metabolic syndrome factors (both individually and combined) and endometrial carcinoma were confined to the heaviest women. The association between the metabolic syndrome and endometnal carcinoma risk seems to go beyond the risk conferred by obesity alone, particularly in women with a high body mass index
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20219764
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  • 10
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; OBESITY ; BODY ; body mass index ; VASCULAR-DISEASE ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; ADIPOSITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; waist-hip ratio ; Diabetes Mellitus ; Diabetes Complications ; COMPETING RISKS ; ANTHROPOMETRIC INDEXES ; CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY ; EXERCISE CAPACITY ; TO-HEIGHT RATIO
    Abstract: Individuals with diabetes mellitus are advised to achieve a healthy weight to prevent complications. However, fat mass distribution has hardly been investigated as a risk factor for diabetes complications. The authors studied associations between body mass index, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and waist/height ratio and mortality among individuals with diabetes mellitus. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, a subcohort was defined as 5,435 individuals with a confirmed self-report of diabetes mellitus at baseline in 1992-2000. Participants were aged 57.3 (standard deviation, 6.3) years, 54% were men, the median diabetes duration was 4.6 (interquartile range, 2.0-9.8) years, and 22% of the participants used insulin. Body mass index, as indicator of general obesity, was not associated with higher mortality, whereas all measurements of abdominal obesity showed a positive association. Associations generally were slightly weaker in women. The strongest association was observed for waist/height ratio: In the fifth quintile, the hazard rate ratio was 1.88 (95% confidence interval: 1.33, 2.65) for men and 2.46 (95% confidence interval: 1.46, 4.14) for women. Measurements of abdominal, but not general, adiposity were associated with higher mortality in diabetic individuals. The waist/height ratio showed the strongest association. Respective indicators might be investigated in risk prediction models
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21616928
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