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  • 1
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Despite the introduction of novel effective treatment regimens like gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel and FOLFIRINOX, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most aggressive epithelial tumors. Among the genetic alterations frequently found in PDAC, mutations in the KRAS gene might play a prognostic role regarding overall survival and may also have the potential to predict the efficacy of anti-EGFR treatment. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the clinical case of a 69 year old Caucasian female that was diagnosed with histologically confirmed locally advanced PDAC with lymph node involvement in August 2010. At the time of first diagnosis, tumor tissue obtained from an open regional lymph node biopsy showed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with a wild type sequence within exon 2 (codon 12/13) of the KRAS gene. The patient initially received single-agent gemcitabine and a subsequent 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy with a sequential maintenance chemotherapy with oral capecitabine resulting in a long term disease control. Local disease progression occurred in May 2014 and the patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy in September 2014. A novel KRAS gene mutation (c.35G 〉 T, p.G12 V) in exon 2 (codon 12) was detected within the surgical specimen. As of January 2016 the patient is still alive and without evidence of the underlying disease. CONCLUSIONS: Specifically in the context of clinical trials and translational research in PDAC a re-assessment of molecular biomarkers, i. e. KRAS, at defined time points (e. g. relapse, disease progression, unusual clinical course) may be indicated in order to detect a potential switch in biomarker status during the course of disease.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28549417
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  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Glyoxalase 1 is a key enzyme in the detoxification of reactive metabolites such as methylglyoxal and induced Glyoxalase 1 expression has been demonstrated for several human malignancies. However, the regulation and clinical relevance of Glyoxalase 1 in the context of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has not been addressed so far. METHODS: Argpyrimidine modification as a surrogate for methylglyoxal accumulation and Glyoxalase 1 expression in tumor cells was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays with specimens from oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients (n = 154). Prognostic values of distinct Glyoxalase 1 staining patterns were demonstrated by Kaplan-Meier, univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis. The impact of exogenous methylglyoxal or a Glyoxalase 1 inhibitor on the viability of two established tumor cell lines was monitored by a colony-forming assay in vitro. RESULTS: Glyoxalase 1 expression in tumor cells of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients was positively correlated with the presence of Argpyrimidine modification and administration of exogenous methylglyoxal induced Glyoxalase 1 protein levels in FaDu and Cal27 cells in vitro. Cal27 cells with lower basal and methylglyoxal-induced Glyoxalase 1 expression were more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect at high methylgyoxal concentrations and both cell lines showed a decrease in colony formation with increasing amounts of a Glyoxalase 1 inhibitor. A high and nuclear Glyoxalase 1 staining was significantly correlated with shorter progression-free and disease-specific survival, and served as an independent risk factor for an unfavorable prognosis of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients. CONCLUSIONS: Induced Glyoxalase 1 expression is a common feature in the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and most likely represents an adaptive response to the accumulation of cytotoxic metabolites. Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients with a high and nuclear Glyoxalase 1 staining pattern have a high risk for treatment failure, but might benefit from pharmacological targeting Glyoxalase 1 activity.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28549423
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  • 3
    Keywords: brain ; RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; IN-VIVO ; LUNG-CANCER ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; EPITHELIA ; TISSUE ; PATIENT ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; TISSUES ; tumour ; CELL-CYCLE ; CYCLE ; DOWN-REGULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; antibodies ; antibody ; LESIONS ; gene expression ; UP-REGULATION ; BENIGN ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; CARCINOMAS ; RT-PCR ; GLANDS ; TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION ; SECTIONS ; protein expression ; HENSIN ; SALIVARY AGGLUTININ ; MALIGNANT BRAIN-TUMORS ; brain tumor ; SUPPRESSOR GENE ; INTERCALATED CELL ; SURFACTANT PROTEIN-A
    Abstract: Background: We studied the expression of DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1), a putative tumor suppressor gene, in normal, proliferative, and malignant breast epithelium and its possible relation to cell cycle. Methods: Sections from 17 benign lesions and 55 carcinomas were immunostained with anti DMBT1 antibody (DMBTh12) and sections from 36 samples, were double-stained also with anti MCM5, one of the 6 pre-replicative complex proteins with cell proliferation-licensing functions. DMBT1 gene expression at mRNA level was assessed by RT-PCR in frozen tissues samples from 39 patients. Results: Normal glands and hyperplastic epithelium in benign lesions displayed a luminal polarized DMBTh12 immunoreactivity. Normal and hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas showed a loss of polarization, with immunostaining present in basal and perinuclear cytoplasmic compartments. DMBT1 protein expression was down-regulated in the cancerous lesions compared to the normal and/or hyperplastic epithelium adjacent to carcinomas (3/55 positive carcinomas versus 33/42 positive normal/hyperplastic epithelia; p=0.0001). In 72% of cases RT-PCR confirmed immunohistochemical results. Most of normal and hyperplastic mammary cells positive with DMBTh12 were also MCM5-positive. Conclusions: The redistribution and up-regulation of DMBT1 in normal and hyperplastic tissues flanking malignant tumours and its down-regulation in carcinomas suggests a potential role in breast cancer. Moreover, the concomitant expression of DMTB1 and MCM5 suggests its possible association with the cell-cycle regulation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15301691
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; transcription ; PATIENT ; FAMILY ; TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ; MARKER ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; SNP ; cancer risk ; COLORECTAL CANCERS ; case-control studies ; INDIVIDUALS ; beta-catenin ; C-MYC ; TYPE-2 ; WNT ; CYCLIN D1 ; signaling ; case-control study ; RE ; FAMILIES ; VARIANT ; case control studies ; ROLES ; CANCER-RISK ; FAMILIAL BREAST ; familial breast cancer ; GENETIC ALTERATION ; Wnt signaling ; type 2 diabetes
    Abstract: Background: The transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) is a critical component of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Aberrant TCF7L2 expression modifies Wnt signaling and mediates oncogenic effects through the upregulation of c-MYC and cyclin D. Genetic alterations in TCF7L2 may therefore affect cancer risk. Recently, TCF7L2 variants, including the microsatellite marker DG10S478 and the nearly perfectly linked SNP rs12233372, were identified to associate with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We investigated the effect of the TCF7L2 rs12255372 variant on familial breast cancer ( BC) risk by means of TaqMan allelic discrimination, analyzing BRCA1/2 mutation-negative index patients of 592 German BC families and 735 control individuals. Results: The T allele of rs12255372 showed an association with borderline significance ( OR = 1.19, 95% C. I. = 1.01-1.42, P = 0.04), and the Cochran-Armitage test for trend revealed an allele dose-dependent association of rs12255372 with BC risk ( P-trend = 0.04). Conclusion: Our results suggest a possible influence of TCF7L2 rs12255372 on the risk of familial BC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17109766
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  • 5
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; carcinoma ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; INHIBITION ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; GENE ; GENES ; LINES ; MICE ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; INDUCTION ; treatment ; 5-FLUOROURACIL ; prevention ; resistance ; AGE ; NUDE-MICE ; CELL-LINE ; chemotherapy ; LINE ; CARCINOMAS ; specificity ; CISPLATIN ; pancreatic cancer ; CANCER-THERAPY ; CYTOTOXICITY ; signaling ; GEMCITABINE ; RE ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; cancer therapy ; pancreatic ; GENDER ; dexamethasone ; GLUCOCORTICOID-INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; NAUSEA ; HISTOLOGY ; in vivo ; surgical resection
    Abstract: Background: Chemotherapy for pancreatic carcinoma often has severe side effects that limit its efficacy. The glucocorticoid (GC) dexamethasone (DEX) is frequently used as co-treatment to prevent side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea, for palliative purposes and to treat allergic reactions. While the potent pro-apoptotic properties and the supportive effects of GCs to tumour therapy in lymphoid cells are well studied, the impact of GCs to cytotoxic treatment of pancreatic carcinoma is unknown. Methods: A prospective study of DEX-mediated resistance was performed using a pancreatic carcinoma xenografted to nude mice, 20 surgical resections and 10 established pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Antiapoptotic signaling in response to DEX was examined by Western blot analysis. Results: In vitro, DEX inhibited drug-induced apoptosis and promoted the growth in all of 10 examined malignant cells. Ex vivo, DEX used in physiological concentrations significantly prevented the cytotoxic effect of gemcitabine and cisplatin in 18 of 20 freshly isolated cell lines from resected pancreatic tumours. No correlation with age, gender, histology, TNM and induction of therapy resistance by DEX co-treatment could be detected. In vivo, DEX totally prevented cytotoxicity of chemotherapy to pancreatic carcinoma cells xenografted to nude mice. Mechanistically, DEX upregulated pro-survival factors and anti-apoptotic genes in established pancreatic carcinoma cells. Conclusion: These data show that DEX induces therapy resistance in pancreatic carcinoma cells and raise the question whether GC-mediated protection of tumour cells from cancer therapy may be dangerous for patients
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16539710
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; MODEL ; PATHWAY ; THERAPY ; CLASSIFICATION ; DIAGNOSIS ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; DISTINCT ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; GENES ; microarray ; ACCURACY ; validation ; PATIENT ; MARKER ; tumour ; STAGE ; PROGRESSION ; AMPLIFICATION ; PATTERNS ; gene expression ; meta-analysis ; PHENOTYPE ; PREDICTION ; SELECTION ; pathology ; MYCN ; neuroblastoma ; SINGLE ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; RE ; METAANALYSIS ; analysis ; methods ; PROFILES ; EXPRESSION PROFILES ; RISK STRATIFICATION ; RARE ; SET ; PLATFORM
    Abstract: Background: Neuroblastoma patients show heterogeneous clinical courses ranging from life-threatening progression to spontaneous regression. Recently, gene expression profiles of neuroblastoma tumours were associated with clinically different phenotypes. However, such data is still rare for important patient subgroups, such as patients with MYCN non-amplified advanced stage disease. Prediction of the individual course of disease and optimal therapy selection in this cohort is challenging. Additional research effort is needed to describe the patterns of gene expression in this cohort and to identify reliable prognostic markers for this subset of patients. Methods: We combined gene expression data from two studies in a meta-analysis in order to investigate differences in gene expression of advanced stage ( 3 or 4) tumours without MYCN amplification that show contrasting outcomes ( alive or dead) at five years after initial diagnosis. In addition, a predictive model for outcome was generated. Gene expression profiles from 66 patients were included from two studies using different microarray platforms. Results: In the combined data set, 72 genes were identified as differentially expressed by meta-analysis at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 8.33%. Meta-analysis detected 34 differentially expressed genes that were not found as significant in either single study. Outcome prediction based on data of both studies resulted in a predictive accuracy of 77%. Moreover, the genes that were differentially expressed in subgroups of advanced stage patients without MYCN amplification accurately separated MYCN amplified tumours from low stage tumours without MYCN amplification. Conclusion: Our findings support the hypothesis that neuroblastoma consists of two biologically distinct subgroups that differ by characteristic gene expression patterns, which are associated with divergent clinical outcome
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17531100
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  • 7
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; tumor ; TUMOR-CELLS ; BLOOD ; CELL ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TUMORS ; TIME ; PATIENT ; COMPLEX ; T cell ; T cells ; T-CELL ; T-CELLS ; FLOW ; BINDING ; DOWN-REGULATION ; TARGET ; NUMBER ; WOMEN ; cervical cancer ; CERVICAL-CANCER ; LIGANDS ; HLA CLASS-I ; RECEPTORS ; PERIPHERAL-BLOOD ; SERUM ; CHAIN ; ONCOLOGY ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; correlation ; ENGLAND ; BETHESDA SYSTEM ; CYTOTOXICITY RECEPTORS ; G MOLECULES ; HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMAS ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS ; NATURAL-KILLER-CELL ; UNIVERSITY-STUDENTS
    Abstract: Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. NK and cytotoxic T cells play an important role in the elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells through NKG2D activating receptors, which can promote the lysis of target cells by binding to the major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) proteins. Increased serum levels of MICA have been found in patients with epithelial tumors. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of soluble MICA (sMICA) and NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in blood samples from patients with cervical cancer or precursor lesions with those from healthy donors. Methods: Peripheral blood with or without heparin was collected to obtain mononuclear cells or sera, respectively. Serum sMICA levels were measured by ELISA and NKG2D-expressing immune cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Also, a correlation analysis was performed to associate sMICA levels with either NKG2D expression or with the stage of the lesion. Results: Significant amounts of sMICA were detected in sera from nearly all patients. We found a decrease in the number of NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in both cervical cancer and lesion groups when compared to healthy donors. Pearson analysis showed a negative correlation between sMICA and NKG2D-expressing T cells; however, we did not find a significant correlation when the analysis was applied to sMICA and NKG2D expression on NK cells. Conclusion: Our results show for the first time that high sMICA levels are found in sera from patients with both cervical cancer and precursor lesions when compared with healthy donors. We also observed a diminution in the number of NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in the patient samples; however, a significant negative correlation between sMICA and NKG2D expression was only seen in T cells
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; GENOME ; RNA ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; MUTATION ; cancer risk ; REGION ; genotyping ; MUTATIONS ; case-control studies ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; FAMILIES ; PENETRANCE ; analysis ; methods ; SUPPRESSOR ; GENOTYPE ; BRCA1 MUTATION CARRIERS ; BIRTH ; CANCER-RISK ; FRAGMENT ; ENGLAND ; comparison ; Rb ; UNTRANSLATED REGION
    Abstract: Background: The variable penetrance of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify disease risk. The C to T transition in the 3' untranslated region of the prohibitin ( PHB) gene alters mRNA function and has recently been shown to be associated with hereditary breast cancer risk in Polish women harbouring BRCA1 mutations. Methods: To investigate whether the PHB 3' UTR polymorphism also modifies hereditary ovarian cancer risk, we performed a case-control study among Polish women carrying one of the three common founder mutations (5382insC, 300 T 〉 G, 4154delA) including 127 ovarian cases and 127 unaffected controls who had both breasts and ovaries intact. Controls were matched to cases by year of birth and BRCA1 mutation. Genotyping analysis was performed using PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Odds ratios ( OR) were calculated using conditional and penalized univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Results: A comparison of the genotype frequencies between cases and controls revealed no association of the PHB 3'UTR_CT+TT genotypes with ovarian cancer risk ( ORadj 1.34; 95% CI, 0.59-3.11). Conclusion: Our data suggest that the PHB 3' UTR polymorphism does not modify ovarian cancer risk in women carrying one of the three Polish BRCA1 founder mutations
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18397521
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  • 9
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; Germany ; PROSTATE ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; RELEASE ; RISK-FACTORS ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; prevention ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; SNP ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; POPULATIONS ; genetic polymorphism ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CODE ; SINGLE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; LEVEL ; HAPLOTYPE ; HORMONES ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; BASE-LINE CHARACTERISTICS ; COMMON VARIANT ; LUTEINIZING-HORMONE ; androgens ; ESTROGENS ; CONSORTIUM ; androstenedione ; Genetic ; COMMON VARIANTS
    Abstract: Background: Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). Methods: We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study ( NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids ( androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results: Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion: Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19640273
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  • 10
    Keywords: Study protocol, PANUSCO, pancreatic adenocarcinoma
    Abstract: Background: Pancreatic cancer is an extremely aggressive malignancy. Subjects are afflicted with a variety of disconcerting symptoms, including profound cachexia. Recent data indicate that the outcome of oncological patients suffering from cancer cachexia could be improved by parenteral nutrition and that parenteral nutrition results in an improvement of quality of life and in prolonged survival. Currently, there is no recommendation of routine use of parenteral nutrition. Furthermore, there is no clear recommendation for 2nd line therapy (or higher) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma but often asked for. Methods/Design: PANUSCO is an open label, controlled, prospective, randomized, multicentre phase IIIb trial with two parallel arms. All patients will be treated with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin on an outpatient basis at the study sites. Additionally, all patients will receive best supportive nutritional care (BSNC). In the experimental group BSNC will be expanded with parenteral nutrition (PN). In contrast, patients in the control group obtain solely BSNC. Parenteral nutrition will be applied overnight and at home by experienced medical staff. A total of 120 patients are planned to be enrolled. Primary endpoint is the comparison of the treatment groups with respect to event-free survival (EFS), defined as the time from randomization till time to development of an event defined as either an impairment (change from baseline of at least ten points in EORTC QLQ-C30, functional domain total score) or withdrawal due to fulfilling the special defined stopping criteria for chemotherapy as well as for nutritional intervention (NI) or death from any cause (whichever occurs first). Discussion: The aim of this clinical trial is to evaluate whether parenteral nutrition in combination with defined 2nd line or higher chemotherapy has an impact on quality of life for patients suffering from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN60516908.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19943918
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